Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires - Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 04:58 AM Thread Starter
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 253
Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

I noticed some video of someones tires being very hard if not solid. Is it a better idea to store the bike in the house? Having cold tires would be bad but I'm unsure. In a 4-wheeler it's ok but on a motorcycle when you go down we should've put the bike in the house every time in the winter or a heated garage. I'm unsure if the tires get harder if it's hot or if it's cold then never gets soft again. Anyone know?
AntDX316 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 03:48 PM
My R6 eats me.
 
R62fst4u's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 19
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Ya its better stored inside unless you want your tire cracking due to cold temperatures.
R62fst4u is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 253
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by R62fst4u View Post
Ya its better stored inside unless you want your tire cracking due to cold temperatures.
Even with Road 5s?

I assume slicks get harder than DOT but is this true?

I think cracking only occurs when you are putting on the tire or taking off but still though, that means the slicks are harder than DOT.
AntDX316 is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 07:54 PM
Touchdown!
 
Straight Success's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: On both coast!
Posts: 1,187
Bike: 2012 R6
Send a message via Skype™ to Straight Success
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

You can leave DOTs on the bike during the winter and they'll be fine. Slicks/DOTs have different chemical compounds. To understand, go review some Chemistrry and Mechanics of Materials to understand the behavior of both. Simple physics are always present amongst a bunch of other things.

It's ideal to keep the bike inside for wintery conditions, but some are unable to. Try to avoid leaving the bike in the elements if you can.


To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Chillin'... while the Lord watches over me!

I love my R6, but...there's no buts...
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Straight Success is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 08:10 PM Thread Starter
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 253
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by Straight Success View Post
You can leave DOTs on the bike during the winter and they'll be fine. Slicks/DOTs have different chemical compounds. To understand, go review some Chemistrry and Mechanics of Materials to understand the behavior of both. Simple physics are always present amongst a bunch of other things.

It's ideal to keep the bike inside for wintery conditions, but some are unable to. Try to avoid leaving the bike in the elements if you can.


To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
That's what it is. It is not the same chemical compounds as DOT which is probably why they say not for street use because it's not just the lack of wet grooves but the hardness when the temperatures drop too.
AntDX316 is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 05:10 AM
I eat my R6
 
Flyers28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Philly
Posts: 1,889
Bike: 07 Candy Red R6
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

As Straight already said research tire compounds. This is the same principle behind buying winter tires for cars. Winter tires have a different glass transition rate which are a little more pliable in colder weather but will be destroyed when running in warmer weather.

Back to bikes, Slicks are designed to be soft and sticky when at operating temps. They are not designed to handle cold weather hence they sometimes crack (become to rigid) in cold weather due to their chemical make up. Your street tires are like all weather tires for cars. They are a happy medium to handle all weather types. But they will still be slightly harder and take much longer to come up to temp in cold weather for obvious reasons. Just because they are round and rubber and all have the same purpose does not mean all tires are the same.

Normal street riding can't hold the temps required for slicks to be effective either, that is why you would never run slicks on the street (aside from the lack of grooves).

So to loop back to the post title and to only echo what has been said...street tires store just fine in winter.

Last edited by Flyers28; 02-04-2019 at 09:41 AM.
Flyers28 is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 06:09 AM
My R6 eats me.
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 9
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Best way - store in house and put on 2 wheel lifters.
Kefirchiks is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 253
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers28 View Post
As Straight already said research tire compounds. This is the same principle behind buying winter tires for cars. Winter tires have a different glass transition rate which are a little more pliable in colder weather but will be destroyed when running in warmer weather.

Back to bikes, Slicks are designed to be soft and sticky when at operating temps. They are not designed to handle cold weather hence they sometimes crack (become to rigid) in cold weather due to their chemical make up. Your street tires are like all weather tires for cars. They are a happy medium to handle all weather types. But they will still be slightly harder and take much longer to come up to temp in cold weather for obvious reasons. Just because they are round and rubber and all have the same purpose does not mean all tires are the same.

Normal street riding can't hold the temps required for slicks to be effective either, that is why you would never run slicks on the street (aside from the lack of grooves).

So to loop back to the post title and to only echo what has been said...street tires store just fine in winter.
So people saying you will have more grip in the dry w/ slicks than you could with any DOT but w/o the warmers it's extremely dangerous. Some people just think it's safe due to the lack of wet grooves and that's the only reason but they are so wrong. Saw a vid where someone low sided 45 degrees w/ slicks because they weren't on warmers at all and it scared me. Dunlop KRs. My R6 never lost control like this even with more degrees on the streets. I had to find out why and this it.

There should be a law about slick tires must be on warmers for a certain time at a temperature before they are allowed to head out.

I was close to putting on slicks but cancelled the order. Luckily got refunded. I didn't know anything about this cold weather solid issue until recently. Went Road 5s. I had done things w/ the lack of understanding but got away w/ it. The cost of understanding is after big issues have already spawned or theorized before happening. The idea is to know everything in a situation before encountering the situation. Crashing out at high-speeds is not something like eating food that has salmonella and suffering for a few weeks or losing a lot of money in gambling. It's also not like messing up relationships that you could do nothing about and move on from. It's going through decades of life struggling to go to the bathroom because the lack of limb function etc. The amount of understanding which could be considered free should be taken more seriously than just being the same question weight as asking how they are doing today.

Last edited by AntDX316; 02-04-2019 at 05:25 PM.
AntDX316 is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-07-2019, 07:34 PM
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Southwest Ohio
Posts: 1,263
Bike: 2008 Yamaha YZF-R6s Stock
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Are you talking about competition riding or street?

I ride during the Winter and have chosen to stick with the Michelin Pilot Road 4s for their additional siping rather than go for the PR5s. The PR5s like the 4s, should do fine during the Winter. Doesn't matter what you're on, you don't go full tilt to the point of irrecoverability first time out. If you do that, wrecking is just a repeated eventuality. As the roads warm, I gradually increase my lean. As the tires scrub from riding, lean and traction increase.

For various reasons, not all of which are related to the tires it's a bad idea to store a bicycle or motorcycle out in the elements. If you can find a secure place to store it for $50/month for the three months or whatever, that would be ideal. Even then, nature's critters may turn it into a home or worse, begin the process of recycling it. This is aside from the rusting that will occur from sitting outside.

Last edited by Intuit; 02-07-2019 at 07:37 PM.
Intuit is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-07-2019, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
I eat my R6
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 253
Re: Storing bike in winter? Rock hard tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intuit View Post
Are you talking about competition riding or street?

I ride during the Winter and have chosen to stick with the Michelin Pilot Road 4s for their additional siping rather than go for the PR5s. The PR5s like the 4s, should do fine during the Winter. Doesn't matter what you're on, you don't go full tilt to the point of irrecoverability first time out. If you do that, wrecking is just a repeated eventuality. As the roads warm, I gradually increase my lean. As the tires scrub from riding, lean and traction increase.

For various reasons, not all of which are related to the tires it's a bad idea to store a bicycle or motorcycle out in the elements. If you can find a secure place to store it for $50/month for the three months or whatever, that would be ideal. Even then, nature's critters may turn it into a home or worse, begin the process of recycling it. This is aside from the rusting that will occur from sitting outside.
I would just change the tires ever 2 years. Same as changing the brake pads. Don't wait until they are worn down to change as the grease from riding a lot can ruin pad performance. I bought the bike used and it came with 2CT but I don't think it was changed every 2 years but I could be wrong. They are hard when in a roundabout with the Road 5s you can feel it. It's soft a bit but I'm not sure if it's because it's new or Road 5 compounds.

Also the idea is to change the oil every 6 months instead of doing it by mile or by look.

UV bulbs also need to be changed every 6-12 months because they no longer emit the right UV levels. It looks like it works though. We need to be after the molecular performance and looks can be very deceiving as they look new but aren't, chemically.

Last edited by AntDX316; 02-07-2019 at 08:00 PM.
AntDX316 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome