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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
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moto gp suspension wonders

Ok, so by now most people will have read up on the new 2009 R1. In it's description it states that it has new suspension technology derived of MOTO GP tricks. This technology is used in a manor where the left fork does nothing but compression damping and the right fork nothing but rebound damping.

The question is, who has heard of it. Who has used it, and who knows of it's practicality in everyday street or occasional track day use? Can a conventional inverted fork be utilized in such a manor? what can be done to a fork to make this an option for us normal folk?

I read the specs on the new R1 and immediatly went searching for the answers. Of course they don't readily exist. I can find no info on the web that they even exist in such a way other han the reviews and technical specs of the new R1. I had thought of it in the past and never really pondered on it to deeply. This makes me wonder. If the compression and rebound can be dealt with by seperate fork legs why couldn't one adjust each leg as needed to acquire the damping force desired. 6 clicks on one side and 2 on the other of compression. This equals rougly 8 clicks on just one leg, OR DOES IT. Does the damping curve change dependant on where in it's range, it is adjusted. Or could one just turn off the compression on one side and the rebound on the other and be provided with reasonable results.

I am forced to wonder if all those years being told that the forks should be adjusted equaly have much ground to stand on. I imagine that if one were to reduce to it's minimum the compression on one leg and the rebound on the other that there would be of course more damping adjustment needed on the respective fork leg. Could it be that since it is likley that the large percentage of us will be near middle adjustment any way that there would be enough adjustment to compensate. Even sites like OHLINS and the like mention nothing of this idea. It seems reasonable to me that the moto gp gods just took a fork and eliminated the respective components required to facilitate that function. They then adjusted as needed the valves shims and orifices to suit the needs of the rider. Or was it that they just got lazy and decided to see if it was ok to make it possible to adjust one side for one thing only.

I wanna know. So if you have anymore insight than this already lengthy ramble please chime in. Yhanks for reading and I hopr you know more than I do about this.


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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 08:39 PM
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

not that this directly answers ur questions, but this is how mountain bike forks have been for a long time.

my guess would be that a fork that isn't specifically designed to function in this manner should still be adjusted equally. it just seems more practical. if one fork leg is set significantly stronger, it will be doing the entire workload



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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 08:40 PM
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

i wonder if there is a hi and lo adjustment for both reb and comp on both sides?
it seems like a great idea to me.

people have been using 2 different spring rates in each fork for years, say a .95 in one and a 1 in the other would give a .975 overall spring rate.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 09:37 PM
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

I think the Kawasaki Z1000 did something like that a few years ago... Back then it was just considered "cheaping out" to do it like that. But maybe the R1's fork is stronger enough than the Z1000's that it can work...


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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 09:47 PM
 
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

Adjusting your forks this way won't benefit you on the street, or even with your stock forks. They design it like that for the main reason that they can get rid of half the parts in each leg, save weight, make the mechanism simpler, and design it specifically for one purpose instead of two, making it more tunable for each type of movement. You can adjust just one fork tube on your bike for very fine adjustments, however, most people will never need that "1/2" click adjustment. Another reason to not try this with your bike is that one valve stack isn't designed to do all the work like this. If you attempt to control all your rebound with only one leg, you will have to reshim your valve stack so that it is basically twice as stiff, thus compensating for the other leg not doing anything. Otherwise you would just have to close down on it completely and get it out of its usable range for it to be stiff enough.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-15-2008, 09:48 PM
 
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

also, with the 09's finally coming out with this technology, it shouldn't be long before ohlins makes a cartridge drop-in that will act the same way. Give it some time and you should be able to upgrade to this if you really want to.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-16-2008, 03:27 AM
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

Intresting, but the next step after this is already out there, electronic forks.
Ohlins ran this on Troy Corsers R1 at the donnington round of the wsb.

It makes a massive difference in braking and corner entry, the bike doesnt dive under braking, well it didnt from the corner i was watching.

A currant is ran though the oil (or the liquid in there) depending on how strong this currant is, will govern how the forks react, so it could even be set corner to corner.


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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-16-2008, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

electronis suspension sounds clever. I know they have been using it for several years on cars. I figured it wouldn't be feasable to use independant damping technique on our standard forks. You never know though these days. it will definetly be interesting to see what technology they use on the bikes as the years go by.


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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-16-2008, 01:19 PM
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

if they can get it small and light enough, thats awesome^
and you thought Ohlins FGR forks were pricey....
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-16-2008, 06:32 PM
 
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Re: moto gp suspension wonders

Yeah the electronic damping fluid would be really cool in the bikes, but I don't think most manufacturers will take the hit in the weight department to put it on. Corvette has been running it for a while now, but it takes some serious energy and computing power to work.
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