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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-09-2019 01:22 AM
Jaamz
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intuit View Post
I do front wheel stands out of most turns at 90 degree angles.
Pffft...I took my front wheel off...wheelies or GTFO!
05-08-2019 06:08 PM
Intuit
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

I do front wheel stands out of most turns at 90 degree angles.
05-08-2019 05:48 PM
AntDX316
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FZ1guy View Post
Wow. I power wheelie out of almost every turn and I've never looped or tumbled even once, much less 50 times. But then, I did not learn to ride on a RC nitro.
With my tune and setup, 1st gear can hit 45 degrees under power. For me I learn how it's supposed to look like then I do it in real-life myself if possible. If it's something like backflipping, front flipping, side flipping, I just give up after attempting but it feels way more dangerous than doing 160+ because at 160+ in the dry it's just more of having control. With gymnastics, if you **** up somewhere in the process you are ****ed. At least w/ riding you can turn, brake, and accelerate still.
05-08-2019 09:47 AM
FZ1guy
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Wow. I power wheelie out of almost every turn and I've never looped or tumbled even once, much less 50 times. But then, I did not learn to ride on a RC nitro.
05-07-2019 05:07 PM
AntDX316
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Also the only reasons why I posted what I've posted imperatively before was I was trying to get people to listen to know what to do on the weakpoints and loopholes that exist but realizing how the world is and the capabilities at my discretion I don't stress about it too much. I would work on a presentation for people to believe but if I never have some sort of "school" involvement I just won't do it but I am right. You can still do things whether people know about it or just yourself. Somethings make absolutely Zero difference if anyone else other than You know. Seeking validation for things is fine if we can't understand if it works or not ourselves but when we know it Does work, having people tell you it doesn't is just a waste of time if analyzed at full-time. I just take mental notes and see if they are right or why they are wrong rather than dismiss and ignore it. Having such data is important to me but I don't stress about it too much as I've used to.
05-07-2019 04:22 PM
AntDX316
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by misti View Post
Well, I have a hard time really understanding much of what you write in your posts but the above sentence I can grasp and agree with. Practice as much as possible, learn the fundamental skills in a safe environment because when you are suddenly required to make and emergency evasive maneuver or emergency brake to avoid something you want to make sure that you have trained those reactions into you. Doesn't do any good if you panic in the most critical moments. Practice makes perfect and the more you practice something the better chance that you will react correctly in that moment.

Here is an example. I took the California Superbike School as a student before I became a coach and did all four levels of rider training. I had the chance to ride the slide bike which teaches you what to do if the rear end starts to slide. (Prior to riding this I had had 3 or 4 nasty race high sides and no concept of exactly why or what had caused them). After learning how to slide the bike safely and NOT chop the throttle I felt more confident in my overall riding. THEN, I was in another race and got on the gas too hard exiting a corner, the rear end started to slide and instead of panicking and chopping the gas like I would have in the past, I kept the gas steady and calmly let off a little bit until the bike regained traction and off I went again. It was the coolest feeling to actually MAKE a riding decision that I knew prevented a serious crash. The more skills you can arm yourself with, the better your chances are that you will react correctly when needed.

Anyone else have any stories like this? How you learned an important riding skill that you used later on to prevent a crash or incident?

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yeah, I started motorbiking pretty much on an RC nitro bike. I learned how it should look like then applied it to real-life. When it starts to wheelie immediately get off the throttle or it will loop and tumble 50 times. If I didn't learn this and learned it in real-life it would be different today.

I can't maybe ride like I used to because I braked too hard and endoed on my e-bike. Right wrist is still kind of bust. I had a situation where I leaned over at least 45 degrees by accident but I kept on the gas. If I had a superbike at the time w/ no TCS I would have already went down at 140+!
05-07-2019 11:01 AM
misti
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AntDX316 View Post
I'd say as much as possible should be done while In training because when things are Live it can sometimes be too late to know not enough understanding was known prior to it happening.
Well, I have a hard time really understanding much of what you write in your posts but the above sentence I can grasp and agree with. Practice as much as possible, learn the fundamental skills in a safe environment because when you are suddenly required to make and emergency evasive maneuver or emergency brake to avoid something you want to make sure that you have trained those reactions into you. Doesn't do any good if you panic in the most critical moments. Practice makes perfect and the more you practice something the better chance that you will react correctly in that moment.

Here is an example. I took the California Superbike School as a student before I became a coach and did all four levels of rider training. I had the chance to ride the slide bike which teaches you what to do if the rear end starts to slide. (Prior to riding this I had had 3 or 4 nasty race high sides and no concept of exactly why or what had caused them). After learning how to slide the bike safely and NOT chop the throttle I felt more confident in my overall riding. THEN, I was in another race and got on the gas too hard exiting a corner, the rear end started to slide and instead of panicking and chopping the gas like I would have in the past, I kept the gas steady and calmly let off a little bit until the bike regained traction and off I went again. It was the coolest feeling to actually MAKE a riding decision that I knew prevented a serious crash. The more skills you can arm yourself with, the better your chances are that you will react correctly when needed.

Anyone else have any stories like this? How you learned an important riding skill that you used later on to prevent a crash or incident?

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04-17-2019 10:21 AM
AntDX316
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FZ1guy View Post
So you were doing 140+ at night - on the street - on a bike with spokes - in shorts and a tee-shirt - running wide and almost hitting a SUV - with 12psi in your tire. You learned how to countersteer on a bicycle, by watching a MotoGP race, and video games. Your body position was perfectly centerlined with the bike and your head, and you were leaned over greater than 45 degrees.

At least you know how it is when things aren't done "right". Who is this other group of people who are saying you are dumb?

I think I have found my new biggest cause of fear.
spokes? the standard yamaha rims

It was motorcycle universe or w/e it is in facebook. They've banned me because I kept stressing the importance of knowing certain things that Have saved me.
04-17-2019 09:41 AM
FZ1guy
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

So you were doing 140+ at night - on the street - on a bike with spokes - in shorts and a tee-shirt - running wide and almost hitting a SUV - with 12psi in your tire. You learned how to countersteer on a bicycle, by watching a MotoGP race, and video games. Your body position was perfectly centerlined with the bike and your head, and you were leaned over greater than 45 degrees.

At least you know how it is when things aren't done "right". Who is this other group of people who are saying you are dumb?

I think I have found my new biggest cause of fear.
04-16-2019 03:52 PM
AntDX316
Re: Biggest cause of FEAR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by misti View Post
Excellent. This is kind of what I was pushing for. Noticing mistakes is the first step to knowing that you are close to the edge, and then changing your riding behaviour to ensure that those mistakes don't happen again. It's surprising to me how many times students will ride around making mistake after mistake without any real awareness of it. I'll notice a mistake (student runs wide and nearly off track) I wait for a safe place to pass and maybe see another corner where they do the same thing, pull them in and ask them how their line was and they're like "it was totally fine, no biggy!" So having awareness of your own riding is paramount. Paying attention to what you are doing and noticing mistakes and then knowing what to do to prevent those mistakes from happening again.

And yes, you an learn something important from every crash, and hopefully from every near miss.



Well I take offence at the suggestion that I'm a bad coach, which I very much am not. I'm an excellent riding coach and very proud of it, however there are just some times that you can't get to a student quick enough or they just do something stupid on track regardless of how many times you have warned them or pulled them in to decrease the gradient of learning or whatever. Sure, sometimes you can have a crappy coach chuck a student into something they aren't ready for or give them too much to learn at once but NOT AT OUR SCHOOL.

CSS is has a very very good training program that moves students through a series of riding techniques that build on one another and a very specific set of coaching methods that we all follow. Every coach is excellent at their job and we do our very best to keep every student upright- however, at the race track and with certain riders comes EGO and lack of awareness and no amount of incredible coaching can prevent all track related crashes. THat's up to the students AND the reason why I'm pressing people to take a good look at their own riding habits and methods for being able to tell whether they are riding close to the edge or not. I mean, you won't always have a riding coach behind you observing you riding ragged and pulling you in to prevent you from wadding up yourself and your bike right? It's up to you to know your limits.

That is the entire point of this thread. What causes YOU to feel fear. How do YOU know you are close to your limit. What can YOU do as a rider to prevent yourself from crashing. I'm passionate about riding skills and technique and in making people better riders.
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yeah, certain things can matter such as having TCS always ON no matter what

If you don't lean too far, brake too late, and accelerate too heavy I think you can pretty much ride anything in the dry w/o issues. Sometimes people crash because they ride like a mountain bike. They don't counter-steer. Need to break those habits. Some grip too hard because of MTB habits too. Some people don't even lean into the turn as they are used to riding "crossed-up". For me, I got super scared when I first got into Sportbiking. Before I got it after passing MSF with the Honda Rebel. I wanted a Rebel but the R6 was better and a bit more. I didn't get it yet as I was waiting for the title. Then waiting for parts as it was sitting in his lot for a while unused. He's the first owner. I was researching Hard about counter-steering as I know on the bicycle I was cheating it. But a few days before getting it I was counter-steering the bike and noticing how it dips fast. I couldn't figure out way back how come the faster I go my steering is unpredictable for a second. Because I don't counter-steer. Well counter-steered properly day 1 and eventually worked on my foot and body positions. Took weeks to pretty much develop the proper feel but I never crashed under massive power. Did 140mph and leaned so damn far it was nuts. Luckily it was the summer as everything was hot. A lot of people wouldn't believe but when the bike tilted over because I twisted the bars too much not knowing the more you twist at a higher lean the faster it rolls over and the lighter I think, I was perfectly centerlined w/ the bottom and the top of the bike with my head. 100% I was greater than 45 degrees of lean lmao. I stayed full throttle doing 140+ and pulling. If I had a Superbike w/ no TCS I would have 100% went down hard. I had shorts and a t-shirt at night. After crashing braking hard into the asphalt with the e-bike, wrist injury and had head bleeding but the bike is fine at like 15-20mph, I realized speeding is really dangerous but it's Only bad when you go down. If you hit nothing but bugs and the wind, you are good. You can do 300mph but crashing at even 20mph can mean broken ribs and other things. People don't want to be told about certain things, they don't want to think about it, they will do it anyway but as long as the process is done correctly, it can be the same as watching the movies in a theater and having dinner at night. You wake up the next day like yesterday didn't matter instead of waking up like ICU people in critical condition. I'd say as much as possible should be done while In training because when things are Live it can sometimes be too late to know not enough understanding was known prior to it happening.

90 degree CNC valve stems and a TPMS sensor attached is the best way to tell you have enough pressure. Some people don't bother checking. Because the way the straight rubber valve are designed, when people put air because the spoke is in the way it can rip/herniate the stem after a while causing an air pressure loss. I was doing 140+ and was wondering why I couldn't turn. Was running wide to the SUV in the other lane but I applied brakes and I was turning tighter. I learned that technique from MotoGP 18 I think (People also argue with me saying video games do nothing, bs). Went home, next day front tire press 12psi!! Also tank grips makes it easier to stay on the bike allowing More control. It should be mandatory but in another group people were saying how it doesn't matter and I am dumb. Some say they don't need "steering dampers", they don't need TCS. We know how foolish that is to believe so. It's cool and all to avoid accidents that would have changed the course for us for the worse, think about things Years prior and regret unnecessarily but it's definitely A lot better than being a vegetable. People can think I am wrong, so what but I know how it is when things aren't done "right" or at least right enough.
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