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Discussion Starter #1
Just looking to get a few opinions on rather I should rebuild my burnt baby or just let it go. Just a little back ground of what happened; R/R was faulty and overheated, causing the fairings to catch fire and so on. Fire took all out above the motor but tank and radiator still good. What would you all do?
 

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Wow that is a sight to see. (in a mechanically morbid sort of way) That looks like an engine fire caused by fuel leak. Voltage regulator is in the back and nothing's too too singed back there. The rectifier is sealed inside the engine, bathed in oil. The transistors and diodes in the regulator would fail long before they got hot enough to ignite most plastics.

Short of a frame, you'd practically need another bike to rebuild that bike. I believe this is what the insurance industry refers to as, "totaled". Buying everything piece-by-piece may end up costing you much as another whole... and even when you're "done" you may find that it just won't run right. Cleaned up, the frame, block and other parts are still worth good money; and would knock something off of the replacement bike purchase. Be honest and let the buyers know that the parts were cleaned up; show the original pics you got here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the input. Before the fire, I got a code 46 on the tach. So after research and others that had a simular reading, that's what I came up with. No fuel issues, leaks, or concerns before, bike was an 2016 and pretty much stock.
 

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46 = "Power supply to the FI system relay is not normal"

The injectors and fuel pump are powered by the same lead wire off the starting circuit cut-off circuit. The same wire also occupies a pin on the ECU harness... likely the monitoring wiring. It's power is run through the injector fuse. Too much power would blow that fuse. It is more likely that LOW power, is what triggered the code. At least for second gen, the metal tank is electrically isolated from the rest of the bike; so it can't ground-out via contact with the frame. My guess is, the fuel leak and resulting heat from the burn, weakened power and grounding for the fuel pump enough to trigger the code.
 

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What commonly creates fuel leaks in these bikes, is folks removing the tank, setting it on the ground, and breaking the tip off of one of the fuel ports. Rather than replace the assembly, some folk either ignore or attempt to glue the tip back on. Gasoline is a solvent, so epoxies and glues do not work for long periods. Many folks get these bikes used and don't realize that the ports are damaged. (hidden until disassembled)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I see. Thank you for the info sir. Knowledge and skill is something I'm continuely trying to increase with motorcycles. I bought the bike brand new, off the sales floor and I've never taken the tank off. I can't think of any other reason I've could of had a leak.

So you think I should sale what I can and move on?
 

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At a minimum, you're looking at buying quite literally an entire front-end from tires and brake fluid lines, caliper rebuild kit, all the electrical wire harnesses, an entire intake system, all replacement engine sensors, user control cables, user controls and switches, a ton of odds and ends, fasteners, fairings, etc, etc, etc, etc....

You can use https://ronayers.com/ to gather part numbers. Then search FleaBay, local bike shops. After you're done pricing everything out, add another several hundred for the odds and ends, mistakes (because it's FleaBay), tools, bad used parts (because it's FleaBay), the unanticipated.

Compare that to what it'd cost to get another from CraigsList or other trade rag; which may come with its own problems though not nearly to the degree of the torched one.
 
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