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Motosylum Racing #132
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You do understand that the injectors are pulsing anywhere from ~ 2.5 - 3.5 ms at idle? At WOT, it's a whole different ball game with the rate and speed at which they spray in fuel - simple multiplication depending on the signal sent to the injectors. You do know that the fuel filter will not catch 100% of the oxidized iron (steel) from the rusted tank? Guess where that oxidized iron (steel) saturated fuel is going? Through the injectors, past the injector pins, and into the combustion chamber. He did what, 3 or 4 sessions with that situation? That's a lot of time and a lot of particulate that could potentially get somewhere it doesn't belong. My $0.02.

In short, I just want the OP to ensure he has no more problems down the road. Peace of mind!
Yeah, I do know. I know that rust is not steel. It is iron oxide. Steel is an alloy that contains iron. ;)
Thing is, I also know that none of it is going to cause a bit of harm in the OPs case. Going through all that work is going to lead to.....nothing except work. Replace or clean/seal (and pray) the tank and get back to riding. Just my experience. Half a dozen bikes have passed through my hands with tanks and pumps like that. And worse.
Hence when the "winterization" questions come up my first suggestion is to "drain the tank". Dipshits do the exact opposite then add some bullshit chemical...lol A quality siphon hose is all of $10 and its really easy to drain a tank that way.
Guess I am a dipshit :) as is all the motorcycle manufacturers. I have never had a full tank rust. Ever. Proof to me is my 1980 BMW R100rs that sat for 15 years with a half full tank. The bottom half was like new. Top half looked like Luray Caverns. That bike is also why I don't like the "sealers". They often fail and separate clogging fuel filters. I ended up acid cleaning that one.
 

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Guess I am a dipshit :) as is all the motorcycle manufacturers. I have never had a full tank rust. Ever. Proof to me is my 1980 BMW R100rs that sat for 15 years with a half full tank. The bottom half was like new. Top half looked like Luray Caverns. That bike is also why I don't like the "sealers". They often fail and separate clogging fuel filters. I ended up acid cleaning that one.
please direct me to a motorcycle OEM that sells/stores a fuel tank full of fuel.

Kreem is garbage... been there and have acid burns from removing that garbage from at least a handful of tanks.
POR15 or Caswell plating... its the tits for old and new tanks. The process takes ALOT of effort but worth the end result. I have a friend that actually made a fuel tank rotissiere that can descale/rust a tank nearly dry. Brilliantly simple invention that sounds like a slow rotating dryer with rocks in it. :grin:

If your bike was stored with 1980s gas... I can see the leaded stuff standing the test of time in a low humidity environment. But basing your beliefs on 1 tiny sample... um thats just not good practice.
Gas goes bad... unless youre buying 100LL or similar.
Bottom line... you drain fuel for storage. Your local FD would appreciate this too.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Wow... Didn't mean to open a huge can of worms! :swordfigh :lmao

Well, I dropped it off at a local radiator shop earlier this week, and had them clean/seal the tank. Only cost $100, and picked it up today. This is the end result:


Honestly, I don't know how to tell if this was a poor or decent job. Looks like they used Red-Kote to seal it. What do you think based off the picture?
 

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Hello, this is my comment on the Q4's, waste of money. My son tracks and used to use the Q3+ for tracking and canyons, was able to get 4 times the amount of mileage over the Q4. He gets 1 1/2 track days on the Q4's and 3 track days on the Q3's, He is upper intermediate and going to the faster group next track day. The Q4's are a waste of money and very soft compound, wear out real fast. He is on a GSXR-750 and his weight is 157lbs. Tracks at chuckwalla raceway, the Q3 are good for times down to a 2min. lap, maybe the Q4 will go down to 1:57, approximately 2 seconds faster. Calculate in the cost, your better off to go from a Q3 to racing tires at those speeds, GPA might be a good choice. I ride a Triumph Street triple RS and run a little over 4sec. slower than my son and use a Q4 as well, I will be switching back to a Q3 tire for tracking due to my slower times. Big hype on the Q4's and definitely not worth the extra money with less results. A lot of my friends are going the same route and as mentioned you can still get your times down low before going to a GPA tire. Good luck and ride safe!
 

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Motosylum Racing #132
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910 Posts
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please direct me to a motorcycle OEM that sells/stores a fuel tank full of fuel.

Kreem is garbage... been there and have acid burns from removing that garbage from at least a handful of tanks.
POR15 or Caswell plating... its the tits for old and new tanks. The process takes ALOT of effort but worth the end result. I have a friend that actually made a fuel tank rotissiere that can descale/rust a tank nearly dry. Brilliantly simple invention that sounds like a slow rotating dryer with rocks in it. <img src="http://www.r6-forum.com/forums/images/R6-Forum_2015/smilies/tango_face_grin.png" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" />

If your bike was stored with 1980s gas... I can see the leaded stuff standing the test of time in a low humidity environment. But basing your beliefs on 1 tiny sample... um thats just not good practice.
Gas goes bad... unless youre buying 100LL or similar.
Bottom line... you drain fuel for storage. Your local FD would appreciate this too.
It was 90's fuel in it, but that is indifferent. All fuels will degrade. Over the courae of 25 years and as many bikes, every tank I've had has been stored full and never has a speck of rust. Well, except for a 84 Honda Nighthawk S that gathered rain water in the tank due to a leaking fuel cap and plugged drain hole. Fact is, oxygen is what causes rust. Not gas. Keeping oxygen and moisture out prevents oxidation. New tanks still have process oils on the steel which will stave off oxidation for a long time. The two dealers I am close to keep used bikes full of fuel. New bikes remain empty until prep. The manufacturers recommend to keep tanks full for storage per every manual I have seen.
 
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