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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know what else runs the 13s coils? Everywhere I’m looking it’s anywhere from 75 to 120 for 1 brand new coil. Some insight would be greatly appreciated
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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Lemme walk you through how to find that out....
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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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So 2008-2016 R6. No other bikes come up in the list.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks man, tried that already but u know sometimes the internet is wrong. Sometimes people will know something that u can’t find on the internet. Like resistance on the coils that match with the ones ur looking for but what do I know. I just joined a forum cuz I was hoping someone would know something I wouldn’t
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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Thsometimes the internet is wrong.
Which is why you should trust a database of part numbers over what some random dude on an internet forum might tell you.
 

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I have a second gen bike, not a third gen like yours. The manual for my second gen does specify a lower resistance. The coils with the lower resistance of original equipment no longer seem to exist. Yes, those with higher resistances work. The trade off is much less gap tolerance. I noticed this in testing with a spark gap tester. This translates to a more frequent re-gap. That is, less mileage between having to pull and re-gap the plugs. Copper is by far the best conductor and therefore the best performer. In addition, the NGK copper plugs are an anti-fowl design. (larger conductor surface area) The manual offers a heat range of 9 or 10 with a 0.6~0.7mm gap (0.0236~0.0276"). Any deviation from spec is NOT recommended. That being said, and being all street, to compensate for the much more frequent re-gap interval, I switched from copper to iridium. (ruthenium wasn't/isn't yet available in our plug package) To compensate for the fact that there are no NGK anti-fowl designs for iridium, I switched the heat range from 10 to 8. Plug inspection will tell you whether you're too hot or incomplete burn. Too hot could result with preignition and possible engine damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have a second gen bike, not a third gen like yours. The manual for my second gen does specify a lower resistance. The coils with the lower resistance of original equipment no longer seem to exist. Yes, those with higher resistances work. The trade off is much less gap tolerance. I noticed this in testing with a spark gap tester. This translates to a more frequent re-gap. That is, less mileage between having to pull and re-gap the plugs. Copper is by far the best conductor and therefore the best performer. In addition, the NGK copper plugs are an anti-fowl design. (larger conductor surface area) The manual offers a heat range of 9 or 10 with a 0.6~0.7mm gap (0.0236~0.0276"). Any deviation from spec is NOT recommended. That being said, and being all street, to compensate for the much more frequent re-gap interval, I switched from copper to iridium. (ruthenium wasn't/isn't yet available in our plug package) To compensate for the fact that there are no NGK anti-fowl designs for iridium, I switched the heat range from 10 to 8. Plug inspection will tell you whether you're too hot or incomplete burn. Too hot could result with preignition and possible engine damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
How many miles between the regaps? Do u remember the ignition coil part # you used?
 

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Using a spark gap tester (meaning a dry atmospheric pressure,) maximum gap tolerance on the higher resistance coil was only a small fraction of what it was for the OEM spec coils. That is, the point at which spark became unreliable. I didn't expect it to work when installed, but it did. I have no precise numbers and could only speculate about tolerances under a wet 12.1:1 compression. The coils came from energycoil.com/products/yzf-r6-2007-2017 BTW it says USA but I think they're actually Canadian.
 

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I have a second gen bike, not a third gen like yours. The manual for my second gen does specify a lower resistance. The coils with the lower resistance of original equipment no longer seem to exist. Yes, those with higher resistances work. The trade off is much less gap tolerance. I noticed this in testing with a spark gap tester. This translates to a more frequent re-gap. That is, less mileage between having to pull and re-gap the plugs. Copper is by far the best conductor and therefore the best performer. In addition, the NGK copper plugs are an anti-fowl design. (larger conductor surface area) The manual offers a heat range of 9 or 10 with a 0.6~0.7mm gap (0.0236~0.0276"). Any deviation from spec is NOT recommended. That being said, and being all street, to compensate for the much more frequent re-gap interval, I switched from copper to iridium. (ruthenium wasn't/isn't yet available in our plug package) To compensate for the fact that there are no NGK anti-fowl designs for iridium, I switched the heat range from 10 to 8. Plug inspection will tell you whether you're too hot or incomplete burn. Too hot could result with preignition and possible engine damage.
Interesting, in my 2005 model I put these.

Ignition Stick Coil Yamaha YZF R6 2003 | eBay

They are Japanese, in theory OEM quality, but do not check all that data that you have said. Failure on my part, it does not hurt to know.
 
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