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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody, upon a lot of research I cannot find a definite answer to this question/problem. What is the real way to stop tank slapping? I have heard to roll off, roll on, rear brake, no brakes at all, squeeze tank, different riding styles all together, bad tires etc.

The list goes on and on. Doesn't mater whether you look for an answer on forums, youtube (why not), other sites. There is always a variety of cures but what is the right one??

I am even more confused because I have a friend who bought a 2012 R6 as a first bike at 21. I asked him about it and he said it had happened to him and all he did was push forward on the bars putting weight on them.

???????? Isn't that what your NOT supposed to do? It kept him alive though because he is a mad man and is real aggressive on the highway lane splitting at 120mph + (I've seen it, go pro verified)

I also hear the R6 is more prone to headshake as well.

then there's the whole steering stabilizer v.s. not needing one and how they are a "bandaid"

Please can someone shed some light on this? I want to be prepared for it if it happens one day.

Thank you
 

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pin it to win it
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First off trying to muscle it isn't going to help you, but make it worse. In theory keeping on the throttle or opening it up more will reduce weight on the front and help.
In reality pucker up your ass, relax your grip, don't chop the throttle or use brakes, and pray lol. It'll end quickly either way.
Also you're better off learning how to prevent a head shake and what causes it.
 

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track junkie
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Also you're better off learning how to prevent a head shake and what causes it.
this

not only is it difficult to correct once it happens, but you're likely to freeze-up anyway in that situation.

i had a massive head-shake moment on a race track and somehow i was able to keep calm, but nothing i tried worked. the bars were shaking so fast and violently i couldn't even let go. i guess you could say that nothing i wanted to try worked as i was pinned in 3rd gear and could do nothing to change it. somehow it eventually stopped, but not before sending me off the track at over 100mph.

in my case, a light front end (due to full throttle) over slightly bumpy track and too much weight on the clip-ons (due to fatigue and poor body positioning) was the recipe for disaster.

a damper will help, but it won't correct bad form. that's where the "band-aid" comments come in.

once head-shake happens, you become just a passenger until it decides to stop or spits you off...


s3aturnr
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for all the advice so far. So let's say I were to make a list of all the things to do to prevent it and/or correct it, it would go like this:

Prevention:
1. Keep and eye out for crap roads/bad parts of the road

2. Try not to get the front end light

3. Do not put a lot of weight on the front bars with bad body positioning

4. Have a steering damper installed just in case ( good idea?)

Anything else?

When it happens:
1. Roll off easy/don't chop the throttle

2. Don't hit the brakes

3. No extra inputs to the bars

Anything else?

I know one day I will want to test the limits of the bike (say an open stretch of empty highway) and the last thing I want is something like this at 140, even geared up

Is there any worthwhile literature on the net about the subject that I should read? I'm trying to be the best rider I can be. Thanks again
 

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pin it to win it
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Check out twist of the wrist 1 and 2. Book or dvd, sometimes it's on YouTube.
 

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Sammiches
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1. Body position

2. Body position

3. Body position.

Try some traction pads on the tank like Stomp Grip. They will aid your legs and midsection taking the weight off your hands. Squeeze that tank.
 

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Thanks for all the advice so far. So let's say I were to make a list of all the things to do to prevent it and/or correct it, it would go like this:

Prevention:
1. Keep and eye out for crap roads/bad parts of the road

2. Try not to get the front end light

3. Do not put a lot of weight on the front bars with bad body positioning

4. Have a steering damper installed just in case ( good idea?)

Anything else?

When it happens:
1. Roll off easy/don't chop the throttle

2. Don't hit the brakes

3. No extra inputs to the bars

Anything else?

I know one day I will want to test the limits of the bike (say an open stretch of empty highway) and the last thing I want is something like this at 140, even geared up

Is there any worthwhile literature on the net about the subject that I should read? I'm trying to be the best rider I can be. Thanks again
The list looks alright but understanding exactly what a tank slapper is and how they usually occur may help solidify the above points a little bit. I wrote an article on the subject and it can be found here: Take a read through and see if that helps. I'm a coach with the California Superbike School so please let me know if you have any more questions after reading. :D

Misti
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you Misti, glad to take advice from someone with your experience level. I will read what you included thoroughly
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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totally agree with above posts.. but unless you are riding wheelies and slamming the front end down.. or a REALLY fast racer who's bike is lofting the front occasionally on corner exit, it's unlikely you will EVER have a tankslapper.
 

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Reads the rulez
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There's two ways to end a tank slapper:

1) The bike whips you off of it. After you fly off, the bike will settle down, before it slams into whatever you were heading into.

2) Pin the throttle. It's physically impossible to get a tank slapper if your wheel isn't touching the ground, right? Less weight on the front end, the better.

Most street squids have never experienced a real tank slapper. They are brutal, and will make you shit your pants the first time you experience it. Most just experience an upsetting of the bars (Which is still very alarming if you've never experienced those either), but not a true tank slapper.
 

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track junkie
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I know one day I will want to test the limits of the bike (say an open stretch of empty highway) and the last thing I want is something like this at 140, even geared up
this is a very bad idea. test the limits of you and your bike at a proper race track. with proper medical personnel and instruction...


s3aturnr
 

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I have a steering damper on my 2006 R6 track bike
it helps with mid corner high speed stability.
To instal one to stop head shake is a band aid measure .
Has your mates bike been set up for his weight ?
The OEM R6 rear shock is notoriously soft.
IMHO
If the rear shock is under sprung the rear wheel will bury down in its stroke lifting and lightening the front of the bike with the right conditions as said earlier , bad body positioning and gripping the bars too tight , coming over a rise on the gas will all feed that situation.
 

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totally agree with above posts.. but unless you are riding wheelies and slamming the front end down.. or a REALLY fast racer who's bike is lofting the front occasionally on corner exit, it's unlikely you will EVER have a tankslapper.

Not necessarily. What exactly causes a tank slapper to occur? How might someone that is of average pace on the street encounter one?
 

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Not necessarily. What exactly causes a tank slapper to occur? How might someone that is of average pace on the street encounter one?
could be a number of things on the street... like surface imperfections, rider input, tire pressure or wear, mechanical problems, etc.
I have a damper on my bike because one racing Org tech rules require it another one doesnt. Either one I participate with has the thing on zero.
Honestly the chassis on the R6 is so good... Id guess most slappers are caused by the nut between the bars/seat. And to explore even further, many of these occur on stock, ill adjusted, or worn suspension.

There are situations in various track environments where a fast rider could overload the front tire for traction. The remedy is usually softer inputs to regain control. On world level comp bikes... the chassis might be so rigid combined with the tires, that a damper may be used for safety. But don't confused these applications with production bikes.

Its not the 70s/80s where frames are made of spaghetti string & low density metals.
 

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^^Slow guy on fast bike^^
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One thing to *try* and remember after a tank-slapper or even some good headshake.. test the front brakes! Misti's article mentioned it, but it's often forgotten when it happens, but you'll figure it out in the next braking zone!!
 

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could be a number of things on the street... like surface imperfections, rider input, tire pressure or wear, mechanical problems, etc.
Exactly. Average paced riders on the street can encounter tank slappers, not just fast racers on the track. So how might surface imperfections and rider input work together to encourage a tank slapper to occur?
 

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Tank slappers are most likely to happen when the rider is holding onto the bike with his hands. Hold onto the bike with your legs and feet. Use your arms as inputs for countersteering, and your hands to control throttle and levers.

As soon as you use your hands to hold on is when you get into trouble. It's happened to me, and it's usually from fatigue when racing. On the street it's from riders who don't know how to ride all that well, which is most of them...
 
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