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Raven6
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just got my bike and was looking at the adjustments on the front forks. one is set on the "S" and the other is set on the "H". I am assuming this means soft and hard.. also one side has 4 lines showing and the other has 5 i believe. Is this supposed to be different from side to side. I would think they should be the same..
The bike is a 2005 and I weigh 150lbs. Can someone give me some pointers on where this should be at??
 

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MY R1 IS A BEAST !!
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IM interested in the answer to this question, i never checked mine. I also have a 2005 raven, now i'm going to have to go outside and check mine out lol

Danny
 

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Baa Whaaaaa
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142 Posts
i just got my bike and was looking at the adjustments on the front forks. one is set on the "S" and the other is set on the "H". I am assuming this means soft and hard.. also one side has 4 lines showing and the other has 5 i believe. Is this supposed to be different from side to side. I would think they should be the same..
The bike is a 2005 and I weigh 150lbs. Can someone give me some pointers on where this should be at??
Yes and no i.e soft and hard, but both sides should be set the same, check your user manual for the benchmarks
 

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Raven6
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i was pretty sure that meant soft and hard.. do you know if more lines makes it more stiff or less? I dont have the owners manual.. as usual the previous owner didnt turn it in with the bike
 

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it does mean hard and soft. so you can keep track of which way is which.

the gold colored bolt, thats the pre-load adjuster.(it's blue on the 99-08s models) basically, it allows you to get a target sag adjustment for your weight. at 150lbs. you probably only need about 6-7 lines showing. the correct way to know for sure is by measuring your sag. or and even easier way it to put a zip tie around each fork tube, and when you are done riding, you want to see it about 1" away from the bottom of the lower tripple clamp that holds your forks. any closer and the forks are about to bottom out.

as far as the slotted adjuster on the top of your forks, those are the rebound adjusters.
this is something you have to adjust to your liking for the most part until you get fast enough to notice irregular wear on the tire treads. (this is really advanced stuff and not exactly necessary for the street)
like tail tidy said, look in your owners manual. it has the "stock" settings. (they are a good ballpark for most riders)

the compression adjustment on your forks are at the bottom.
compression isn't as important as the rebound is. (told this by several suspension guru's)
 

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Raven6
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
awesome man .. thanks for the tip.. the zip tie is a great idea.. I wasnt sure how i could measure the sag. i am gonna find an owners manual so i can get the exact setting it needs to be at. Thanks for your help.
 

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Tires tell no lies
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737 Posts
First, if you can, ride your bike to a local track day event and find the on-site suspension person (there is one at every track day event). They charge $35-$45 to set your sag and dial in your suspension to your requested set up (Street or track). You dont have to sign up for a track day to bring your bike in.

Second, For a new rider, it is unneccesary to use a zip tie to measure your fork preload. This is compressed from how hard you use the brakes. Additionally, most pro racers I see and from experience you really want to use the entire fork travel. So, the zip tie should really be about 1/4" from bottoming out.

Preload:(Large nut on top of fork) 6-7 lines sounds like a good starting point for a 150lb street rider.

Rebound: (top flat head screw) I would count the entire range of clicks then start in the middle.

Compression: (bottom flat head screw) See rebound above, follow same.

Rear Shock: I would set it two notches from being all the way extended (opposite of compressed) Counterclockwise.

Rear Shock compression, Rebound: Find range, start in middle.

THose arent the ideal settings for an intermediate rider or for the track (would be stiffer) but those should make the bike feel comfortable for you to ride on the street.
 

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Raven6
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
will using those setting u mentioned still allow me to take turns well? I have a couple places around my house that have lots of fun ass turns to take
 

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Tires tell no lies
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I learned how to carve up the local mountain on a few different bikes in the late 90's with all the suspension set up in the middle because I didnt know better and there wasnt this lovely "information superhighway" call the internet with this great info.

Those settings are perfect for street riding over bumps comfortably and carving up the twisties on the weekends.

Remember, stiff settings are ONLY for Track riding on tracks that are maintained properly (there are like 4 in the U.S.) Just kidding. I ride on about 5 different tracks and only two of them I can use stiff settings. Those are also the more expensive tracks I ride...

But its SO worth it.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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The 05 R6 is set up more for a rider that is about 170 -175 lbs. Us lighter folk will have a tough time getting full use out of the front suspesion. I am about 170-175 lbs. with full gear. And I have the front pre load adjusted all the way out. It is still to stiff. I am only running about 4-5 clicks from full soft of compression and the zip tie will get to about 1/4" left of travel. I am pretty agressive rider, late on the brakes and trailing through the turn. The front rebound is pretty responsive though. To stiff and the bike will keep turning into the turn even if you don't want it to. And if it is to soft the bike will run a wider line on you mid turn. I set the front rebound at about 6-8 clicks out from full soft and it seems to work for me.

The rear shock is a little more suited for us lighter folk. I have the pre load set at # 3 and it is about right on for sag. compression is set at about 10 clicks out from full soft, roughly mid stroke. The rebound on the other hand is almost useless. I can't for the life of me get rid of the feathering on the leading edge of tread caused by to little rebound as I understand. I was at full stiff and it didn't help so for the sake of trying I went full soft and it didn't change. I gave up on tire wear and shot for best handling. I shoot for as soft a rebound setting as I can get where the tire will still track well after hitting a bump while leaned over. To soft and the bike will wallow. To stiff and the bike will run wide mid turn and traction is comprimised over bumpy surfaces. I had it set for the longest time at 28 Clicks out from full soft. This works well but is about 2 clicks from full stiff. And I fear overheating the hydrolic system in heated twisty bouts with my buddies. I am currently serching for a new setting that I am happy with after returning my front forks back to stock height.

Which brings me to the next point. I had raised the forks in the triple clamps 3/8" and it did make the bike turn in quicker. But tank slappers occured just about any time I was heavy on the gas. I am a very light input kinda guy so I almost am never holding onto the bars very hard. As agressive of a rider as I am I try very hard to be as light on the bars as possible. I put the forks back up to stock height and magically the tank slappers went away as expected ( they never really bothered me but were starting to slow me down ) and my times decreased. Another downside to tank slapperes that are aggressive is that it will force the pads out. That means next time you go into a turn at 130 m.p.h you have no brakes untill you pump them back up ( trust me I know.... And it really sucks). so leave the forks in the stock position in the triple clamps.

It can be fun to tinker with suspesion settings but can also be problematic if you change to many things at once. I would start with the setting in ther middle position as stated by another gentleman. I would then evaluate by means of using a tuning guide to acquire settings that make you happy. The problem is that most problems with suspension don't occure untill a certain speed, usually one that is faster than you are currently going. So you fix that problem and then you find another as soon as you start going faster. Don't try and second guess the bike. Ride it untill there is an unmistakeable issue. Resolve it and ride it untill you find another unmistakeable issue, fix it and repeat. A lot of times changing riding style can work around a problem. So see if that can fix it to. To tight a grip on the bars can make things appear that really may not be happening. Relaxing the grip on the bars may resolve what you thought was an issue. Being off the gas through most of the turn will make the front feel very twitchy and at the edge of traction, giving you the sence that you need to change something. However getting on the gas sooner in the turn will make those issues all but disapear. Baby steps. make sure you make adjustments in steps. Don't go from one extreme to the other. Try a couple clicks one way. If it is better try a couple more and see if it improves even more. If not then go back to the point that things were better. good luck have fun and hope this helps.
 

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you don't want to use your entire fork travel, that means it's being compressed all the way and now the tire is being used as the rest of the suspension.
 

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Tires tell no lies
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You want as much of your fork travel available without bottoming out. Hence the 1/4 in spare movement after riding on the track. Street settings are going to be less aggressive, even if you ride in twisties. You shouldnt be bottoming out ever on your forks. You will "POGO" on your tire. Speaking from experience. Luckily I was using tires with exceptional grip that prevented a crash. I wasnt running the correct spring rate for my weight, even though I had my sag setup by a racetech suspension tech at the track. I worked around the problem by increasing my compression one click (only that day).
 

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jesus how much do you weigh? with my gear on I weigh in at 230. and I have 4 lines showing using stock springs and it leaves the zip tie about 1/2 of an inch away from the triple.

here's a pic of my fat ass out breaking a few guys into a corner, you can see how much my suspension is compressed. this is breaking from about 105mph to 75-80. just for a few secs of compression but it's still not enough to bottom them out with the stock springs. (for this track, the stock springs work for me)
I'm no expert but my tire wear looks good to all the suspension guys. and they keep telling me it's about perfect if I'm not bottoming out the forks.

 

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crashing aint so bad
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I will pull the rear tire up off the ground when braking into a turn if I have to. I am very agressive. I have no problem whatsoever going into a turn after having the rear tire bouncing off the pavement. My pre load is set to get it as close as possible to proper sag. I also use very little compression. This will allow the forks to collapse a little faster than someone with a higher compression setting. Someone with a higher compression setting will see a little less fork travel under normal riding than someone with less, even with the same pre load and rider weight.
 

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Tires tell no lies
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So where are your riding? What track? Is that willow turn three?
 

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putnam park going into turn 9.

I've done a few stoppies too and it still didn't push the zip tie all the way up.
after actually having a set of my forks springs in my hands, I really find it hard to believe they are strong enough to support a motorcycle and the rider.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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Very good! you know your tracks. That is turn three for me at willow. That was a year ago. My first time at that track. Love the OMEGA.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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Keep in mind that there is also air trapped inside of the fork tube. This will also compress and provide a bit of spring. The spring in the fork is usually a straight weight spring. The air trapped inside the fork will be a progressive form of spring as the fork colapses. You can if you really had to remove an equal amount of oil from each fork leg and in a sense reduce the spring rate. This will alow the fork to compress a little more. It works the other way to. You can also add oil and inrease the spring rate. This is the poor mans way of doing it. You are not actually changing the spring weight, but using the compression of trapped air to make the suspension work in a certain range.
 
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