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Discussion Starter #1
I've been riding by myself for almost a year now but i have no idea how to ride in groups. One of my friends just bought a new bike and i don't know whether we should split lanes or not? We usually run staggered formation but at a red light should we be splitting or sharing the same lanes? Also, at a stop making turns who is supposed to go first? when making a left does the person on the left turn first? and for making a right, does the person on the right turn first? and what hand signals do you use while riding together?
 

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all my riding so far till the 15th will b on the road, all 36,000 miles. i think it would be a good idea to have 1 person the leader n 1 person the fallower, if u guys r going out spiltting lanes u dont want both of u to be a leader n end up into each other on accident. the fastest person at the front, lol. staggered as much as possible is good, u dont want the person in front of u blocking your view. always look ahead of urself and even ahead of the other person your behind , u dont want to really fallow them, just stay behind them n ride your own.

id like to see what other people think and what they do when they ride with someone on the track?
 

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all my riding so far till the 15th will b on the road, all 36,000 miles. i think it would be a good idea to have 1 person the leader n 1 person the fallower, if u guys r going out spiltting lanes u dont want both of u to be a leader n end up into each other on accident. the fastest person at the front, lol. staggered as much as possible is good, u dont want the person in front of u blocking your view. always look ahead of urself and even ahead of the other person your behind , u dont want to really fallow them, just stay behind them n ride your own.

id like to see what other people think and what they do when they ride with someone on the track?
follow... say it again follow
 

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^^^ Ginger here...
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the fastest person at the front, lol.
I don't really agree with this. I was always told in 2-3 person rides, put the person with the least experience up front so they ride at their own pace. If you put the fastest up front, the person in the back feels pressure to keep up and ride out of their skill level.

In large groups, don’t EVER put an inexperienced rider in the middle of the pack. They are being pushed both forward and back and will have problems, especially riding out of their skill level.

As far as stopping goes, both pull up to next to each other at a stop. Someone mainly stop left and the other pulls up right. This helps old ladies without depth perception not hit you. When you start to move again, whoever is leading goes first.

When making a turn, the follower needs to make sure to leave themselves an out incase the leaders washes out to avoid hitting them.

Never ride next to someone at speed.

Always ride your own ride…It’s very hard to do sometimes when riding with friends.

Remember that you are working together as a team to minimize risk. If you cut a car off, the person can’t follow you. This means that when making lane changes and quick decisions, make sure you leave enough space and reaction time for the both of you.

This list could just go on and on. My advise is really only for the street, track is totally different. Just be smart about it and have fun. Try riding with another group and let them know you haven’t ridden it groups before, they will gladly teach you so you don’t wreck them. Maybe someone on here can take you around your town and show you the ropes.
 

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Like everyone said, ride your own ride. Don't feel pressured. If you're too nervous, continue to ride solo for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't really agree with this. I was always told in 2-3 person rides, put the person with the least experience up front so they ride at their own pace. If you put the fastest up front, the person in the back feels pressure to keep up and ride out of their skill level.

In large groups, don’t EVER put an inexperienced rider in the middle of the pack. They are being pushed both forward and back and will have problems, especially riding out of their skill level.

As far as stopping goes, both pull up to next to each other at a stop. Someone mainly stop left and the other pulls up right. This helps old ladies without depth perception not hit you. When you start to move again, whoever is leading goes first.

When making a turn, the follower needs to make sure to leave themselves an out incase the leaders washes out to avoid hitting them.

Never ride next to someone at speed.

Always ride your own ride…It’s very hard to do sometimes when riding with friends.

Remember that you are working together as a team to minimize risk. If you cut a car off, the person can’t follow you. This means that when making lane changes and quick decisions, make sure you leave enough space and reaction time for the both of you.

This list could just go on and on. My advise is really only for the street, track is totally different. Just be smart about it and have fun. Try riding with another group and let them know you haven’t ridden it groups before, they will gladly teach you so you don’t wreck them. Maybe someone on here can take you around your town and show you the ropes.
i was thinking the same thing. good opinions. the first time i rode with a buddy i waited for him on the side of the on ramp. not safe but i wanted to wait because it was his first freeway run.
 

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Live Love burn Die.
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the leader must ride a whoolie at all times, even while turning. the "fallower" must ride in a t shirt and shorts.
 

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I don't really agree with this. I was always told in 2-3 person rides, put the person with the least experience up front so they ride at their own pace. If you put the fastest up front, the person in the back feels pressure to keep up and ride out of their skill level.

In large groups, don’t EVER put an inexperienced rider in the middle of the pack. They are being pushed both forward and back and will have problems, especially riding out of their skill level.

As far as stopping goes, both pull up to next to each other at a stop. Someone mainly stop left and the other pulls up right. This helps old ladies without depth perception not hit you. When you start to move again, whoever is leading goes first.

When making a turn, the follower needs to make sure to leave themselves an out incase the leaders washes out to avoid hitting them.

Never ride next to someone at speed.

Always ride your own ride…It’s very hard to do sometimes when riding with friends.

Remember that you are working together as a team to minimize risk. If you cut a car off, the person can’t follow you. This means that when making lane changes and quick decisions, make sure you leave enough space and reaction time for the both of you.

This list could just go on and on. My advise is really only for the street, track is totally different. Just be smart about it and have fun. Try riding with another group and let them know you haven’t ridden it groups before, they will gladly teach you so you don’t wreck them. Maybe someone on here can take you around your town and show you the ropes.
+1..for the most part..if someone in our group is new, we keep them towards the middle and put the skilled guys in the front and back of the group. We like keeping the new riders out of the back of the group tho so if they were to crash, panic, whatever, theres another rider/riders there to aid.

Give everyone space...new riders, seasoned riders..it doesnt matter...big group rides are a diaster waiting to happen because no one ever gives people enough space.
 

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he did ask for advice for riding in pairs, not in a group, so why would u want the new guy in front of u? i rather have the better rider in the front then the new guy in front messing up the flow.
if someone feels pressured to ride faster, then they shouldnt be riding, u have to ride your own pace or the person leading should know they got a slower rider behind them and b a good leader and slow down a little.
when i first started riding it took me a few weeks to get on the freeway, and when i got on the freeway i went by myself so that i wouldnt have to worry about being behind someone. once on the freeway i found it was easier then riding around town, but i did take it easy and went at my own pace n went when i thought i was ready, not when someone else told me to get on it
 

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Meh
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he did ask for advice for riding in pairs, not in a group, so why would u want the new guy in front of u? i rather have the better rider in the front then the new guy in front messing up the flow.
You really don't want that. If the new guy makes a mistake, you want it to be in front of you, where you can do something about it.

You don't want the new guy behind you, trying to catch up, getting target fixation on your rear wheel, failing to turn in at the right time, failing to get on the brakes soon enough, etc., etc. It much safer to have the experienced person ride behind. If the new guy messes up, the experienced rider will be able to see it and react appropriately. The other way around is a recipe for disaster.

If it's literally just a pair of guys, let the new guy lead the first run, then the next time through if the new guy is feeling comfortable with the route and he's someone you trust, I'd feel ok switching it up.
 

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maybe its how u feel, cause when i first got on a bike there was no way id want to lead. i wanted to be behind and see how i should be riding, not ride how i think i should be and then find out 50miles later that i wasnt taking the turn correctly.
thats how i played it for a while then i ended up being the leader with my friend. n if your riding with someone u shouldnt be taking off so fast that they have to struggle to catch up, or if the new rider is fixated on someones rear wheel they shouldnt be riding. look ahead always is one of the key things to do on a bike.
 

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I think it depends on what type of riding your are doing.

If you are just out for a cruise, then the less experienced rider can be in front of you. This way you can see what he is doing and correct him on his mistakes.

When in the twistys with my close riding friends, we typically go in order from fastest to slowest. I stay away from riding aggressively with people i don't know. You never know when someone is going to do something stupid and cause you to wreck.
 

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If its just riding around town then i wouldnt want an inexperienced rider behind me. Theres no telling what's gonna happen...like someone here said, let the noobie go first then point out what he's doing wrong.When you see him improving go ahead and take the lead so he can further progress.
 

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I'D RATHER BE RIDING
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I've rode in pairs and in groups a lot. However you do it, it is a good idea to go over what your procedure is before the ride so that everyone knows their role, what to expect from others and what hand signals will be used. If in pairs a good leader will be mindful of the follower and not exceed their limits. It should be known ahead of time what he will do if he does want to push his though. Usually what has worked for me is I let all involved know that if I get on it to only come if they are comfortable and if I see that they have fell behind, then I will wait at the next signaled, change of direction turn, until they catch up. This way the person following does not feel pressured to keep up. If there is something in the road that I feel is a hazard I will stop by it or point to it if they are close enough. Whether in a pair or group we always stagger except at lights or towns where speed is slow and also if the state were in allows lane sharing. Everywhere else we are tight in the straights and single file through turns. The faster the pace the more room is given. At lights and sharing the inside guy goes first and then after the turn is made whoever was leading moves up and everyone else falls back in place. Equally skilled riders in the middle will usually swap around as they see fit. Also you should stay in the mirror of the guy in front of you and anyone behind you should do the same. This usually is a good way to set up spacing and if you are going to move up in the line it allows the opportunity to let the guy your passing know. Just wait till he looks at you in his mirror and then move up beside, then proceed ahead. When we ride in a group we always put Skilled up front. He knows the route and can lead. Then a group of beginners in the middle and a skilled guy last that also knows the route. He does not pass the beginners and if something happens he is there to help or give pointers and he usually knows where the leader might stop. In any event everyone should always know the signals and what is expected of them. Also if you are ever uncomfortable with a group or pair then you can always stop or leave the group. We always stop and ask all involved if the pace is ok with everyone and then make adjustments before that happens. Here are some basic hand signals that we use.


:lmao:bowroll:lmao:bowroll:lmao:bowroll

No really though just google motorcycle hand signals and there is a bunch. You and the people you ride with just need to come up with what works for you and go from there. Hope this helps.
 
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