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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a track/race bike (99 R6), and am going to replace the tires on it soon. To my surprise, I noticed it has 190/55/17 Dunlop on the rear. Stock appears to be 180/55/17.
Do most guys go with the wider tire for track day/race day setups? Will this throw off any geometry/suspension settings?
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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you can run a 180/55/17 if you want, and for a beginning track rider that would be fine.. however most racing tires have gone to 190/55/17. Pirelli i think has a 180/50/17 that is similar in contact area to a 190/55/17.

if the tire is old/worn, i would get a new set (michelin of course) as good tires are the best insurance you can get for track days.

Yes, you may need to adjust the rear ride height a bit going from 190/55 to 180/55 or vis versa. Before i was using a 190 all the time, i would pull the 5-6mm shim out from on top of the shock for the 190, and put it back for the 180. This shim was standard equipment on the 3rd gen bikes as they came with 180's, but yamaha knew many would go to the 190, and as the stock shock was not ride height adjustable, this put you in the ballpark by removing the shim..

190 will give more contact patch at lean, so you can get on the gas harder..earlier. If you are beginning, you may find the 180/55 to be a bit easier to flick back and forth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
you can run a 180/55/17 if you want, and for a beginning track rider that would be fine.. however most racing tires have gone to 190/55/17. Pirelli i think has a 180/50/17 that is similar in contact area to a 190/55/17.

if the tire is old/worn, i would get a new set (michelin of course) as good tires are the best insurance you can get for track days.

Yes, you may need to adjust the rear ride height a bit going from 190/55 to 180/55 or vis versa. Before i was using a 190 all the time, i would pull the 5-6mm shim out from on top of the shock for the 190, and put it back for the 180. This shim was standard equipment on the 3rd gen bikes as they came with 180's, but yamaha knew many would go to the 190, and as the stock shock was not ride height adjustable, this put you in the ballpark by removing the shim..

190 will give more contact patch at lean, so you can get on the gas harder..earlier. If you are beginning, you may find the 180/55 to be a bit easier to flick back and forth.
Well, as long as the 190 is ok, I think I'll stick with it at this point.

For just track days, what Michelin tire would you recommend? (Funny you posted/recommended them, as the bike has the Michelin brand name painted all over it!) I do not have warmers, and don't plan to purchase them unless they are in your guys' opinion a must have, even for track days.
 

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Mr. HER6
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Doesnt that vintage bike have a 5.5 rim?
I'm pretty sure ALL R6s came with a 5.5'' rim.
Well, as long as the 190 is ok, I think I'll stick with it at this point.

For just track days, what Michelin tire would you recommend? (Funny you posted/recommended them, as the bike has the Michelin brand name painted all over it!) I do not have warmers, and don't plan to purchase them unless they are in your guys' opinion a must have, even for track days.
All the manufacturers give recommendations of whether warmers should be used and offer decent tires that do not require them, they are just at a lower performance level. Depending on your pace you may be better off saving some money and hassle and skipping the race compounds and warmers for a while. But if you're going to step up to race compounds, then yes I would say it's a must-have. I'm not that familiar with Michelin's offerings so I can't comment on what are good Michelins to run without warmers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm pretty sure ALL R6s came with a 5.5'' rim.

All the manufacturers give recommendations of whether warmers should be used and offer decent tires that do not require them, they are just at a lower performance level. Depending on your pace you may be better off saving some money and hassle and skipping the race compounds and warmers for a while. But if you're going to step up to race compounds, then yes I would say it's a must-have. I'm not that familiar with Michelin's offerings so I can't comment on what are good Michelins to run without warmers.
Pretty new to track days, so I'll stick with the DOT type tires for now, and just run a warm up lap or two. Thanks!
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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michelin has the "supersport" that is a track day tire, and i know many were impressed with the power pure i think.. There are a ton of threads on those tires. The power CUP is the latest full competition race rubber, but you are talking $400 a set. You will have more grip , but they won't last as long as the sport tires (as they are softer rubber) .
 

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Track junkie wanna be
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I have run the PP3 and like them alot. Just pay attention to tire pressure and they will hold and grip. Give them a lap maybe two to warm up and they will be good to go. Ran a weekend with them last year at Jennings then this year put fresh PP3s on and did another weekend on them and they held up great both times. I ran the stock size 180/55 and never felt it slip or want to step out but then again I am just a fast novice.
 
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