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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just picked up some Arata rearsets along with a rear brake caliper/cylinder/and steel brake line.

Planning on installing everything in the morning but had a few questions regarding the rear brake.

Will I need to drain the rear brake fluid to install the rear sets? and will I need to do so if the rear caliper/cylinder/brake line are all already put together with fluid already in the reservoir?

Reason I ask is because this whole set came together already assembled so, I rather swap this set with my stock caliper and cylinder so as not to have to drain the rear brake fluid, I already had it changed not too long ago..

Any possible issues or advice? Thanks guys.

Also, anyone know where I can find instructions on how to install the rearsets? Arata's website is useless.
 

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Go Ahead
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If you have the whole setup already full of fluid, just bolt it right up. You should be good to go.

Rear sets are real easy, just remove the 2 allen head bolts, remove rearset, install new rearsets. Nothing really to it.

-Ant.
 

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190rwhp......:eek5
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^yup


Id still bleed the system after installation though...primary reason being to put some fresh fluid in there....just so ya know how old the fluid is...
 

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Life is best beyond 10k
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^yup


Id still bleed the system after installation though...primary reason being to put some fresh fluid in there....just so ya know how old the fluid is...
:werd

Besides, air bubbles suck and ya never know if one got caught....
 

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Premium Member
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Stunt Rider
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+1 on the new fluids. It's peace of mind.
 

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what?

If you don't have to touch the fluid then don't. Especially if you recently got it switched. I replaced my rear sets and there is no reason you should get an air bubble unless you touch more then just the rear set.
 

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scared of big tracks
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If you are going to need a rear brake pressure switch then you're going to have to drain the brake fluid since the pressure switch will take the place of the banjo bolt on top of your rear m/c.

I'm with the "get new fluid" crowd. Doesn't take long in the rear to do it, so just put some fresh stuff in there and you'll be good to go.
 

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Premium Member
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As long as the reservoir doesn't end up being upside down during the install when it's dangling then you should be fine.

A few Air bubbles in the rear MC isn't totally a bad thing.... just sayin'
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I appreciate all the feedback guys but, just to clarify, I will pretty much be swapping the entire rear brake assembly (OEM Caliper/Cylinder/Brake line), with a completely assembled new rear brake assembly (OEM Caliper/Cylinder/Steel brake line) while I change out my OEM rearsets with Aratas.

I'll be replacing this setup:


With this:


Pads seem like they have a significant more amount of life left on the new assembly than on mine as well:



So as you can see, the assembly is already put together. I pretty much just need to swap the one I bought with the current setup on the bike all while I install the new rearsets.

My question is, will there be any need to drain the brake fluid if I'm just swapping them out without taking either assembly apart piece by piece? And if I'm going to be attaching them to the new rearset, will that require draining or can that slip by as well?

If it needs to be drained, then I will. Only thing is that I don't have any brake fluid or hoses to use to get this done. So, I'll probably have to take it apart, assemble the new assembly on there with the rearsets and then ride it down to the local shop (without using the rear) to have it bled and replaced..

Any suggestions or clarification would be great, thanks!
 

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Stunt Rider
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If you don't plan on installing the SS brake line then you can just do a simple swap. The brake lever is connected to the MC by one bolts/screw, just remove the codder pin and presto.

It's really up to you. This is a stupid simple swap.

Hit up Autozone or Pepboys for fluid and tubes. All you need is a pint of DOT 3 or 4 and short clear hose.
 

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Life is best beyond 10k
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I'd bleed the brakes anyhow for your own peace of mind. There should be no way for air to get in IF it's kept sealed. But I'd feel better knowing the brake fluid was fresh, etc.

And get some $8 DOT 4 or 5.1 brake fluid from an auto parts store, a length of plastic tubing, an empty soda/water bottle and an 8mm open socket wrench (at least what size my Honda bleeder nut is) and go at it. No need to pay a dealer to do it. It took me about 20 minutes last night. It would've taken an even shorter time if I didn't scrape my pinkie and spent time cursing, wincing and finding a bandaid.
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The SS brake line is already attached to the new assembly, and I will be keeping it on the new assembly to install onto the bike.

So, I take it no drainage is necessary? Even after assembling onto the new rearset?
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'd bleed the brakes anyhow for your own peace of mind. There should be no way for air to get in IF it's kept sealed. But I'd feel better knowing the brake fluid was fresh, etc.

And get some $8 DOT 4 or 5.1 brake fluid from an auto parts store, a length of plastic tubing, an empty soda/water bottle and an 8mm open socket wrench (at least what size my Honda bleeder nut is) and go at it.
Got it.

Do you suggest I drain the fluid prior to or after the swap?
 

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Life is best beyond 10k
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Premium Member
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I see you have a new assembly. I was under the impression you didn't..

You should bleed it, don't know what condition it's in. I take it you bought it all from someone used?
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I see you have a new assembly. I was under the impression you didn't..

You should bleed it, don't know what condition it's in. I take it you bought it all from someone used?
Yea, new assembly bought used last night from a local rider (along with the rearsets).

I'll drain it after the swap. Thanks a lot everyone, I'll update you and post pics once I'm done.
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Quick rant:

Alright so these Aratas came with no instructions and the company is beyond fail. I felt like I was talking to some old backward guy on some serious downer meds once I finally got ahold of someone at their company (which could be located in a cave in the middle of nowhere at this point from what it sounds like). And no, he was of absolutely ZERO HELP.

Also, Arata's website makes me feel like we're back in 1998, with no help in terms of rearsets whatsoever. /rant

Anyways, I have to go pickup a punch of washers and extended bolts (for the rearsets and my coolant reservoir) and an extra spring for the rear brake (aside from the one already on there), since the guy I bought these from didn't supply them or even mention the fact.

Got the rearsets on there but with quite a bit of frustration. Apparently the Arata shift rod goes onto the OUTSIDE of the frame.. Satos were SO much simpler to deal with.

In terms of the rear brake caliper, the pads are clamped shut and I can't seem to get them loose to fit over the rotor. Any ideas?

Will post pics sometime tomorrow.
 

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Life is best beyond 10k
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You can usually force a flat head screwdriver in between the pads and forcethem apart. Alternatively, some calipers have a release screw or way to get the piston to recede. You may need to get the pads out first. It may be that you have to drain the fluid out so there's no pressure working against you.

Cant help on the rest.
 

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YZF-er!
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You can usually force a flat head screwdriver in between the pads and forcethem apart. Alternatively, some calipers have a release screw or way to get the piston to recede. You may need to get the pads out first. It may be that you have to drain the fluid out so there's no pressure working against you.

Cant help on the rest.
Tried the forcing a screwdriver but to no avail. I'll try looking for the release screw but I'm pretty sure at this point that the piston will have to recede.

Thanks though!
 
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