Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been riding for a year or so now, track days for me are still a few months away.. Got some canyons near me, and I use the pace to practice but i've found that I constantly keep shifting my focus on different things. What should I focus on in order or importance?

My toes are perched like a bird, i sit a few inches back, i'm short tho at 5"6 so not too far. I flex my core to hold my upper body up and arms loose, holding the bars like a baby bird.

When coming to a corner, I stay on the outside and look into the turn for the apex while either braking or rolling off. I scoot my butt off a small amount, like half a cheek and lower my chest and head to the inside mirror. At about the same time I lower my upper body, I try to consciously make a forceful, but smooth input pushing inside and pulling outside, and look thru the turn. Am I supposed to look at the road as its appearing, or past the road, like through the "wall"? Once leaned and on my line I crack the throttle open, and roll it on slow, or hold it neutral depending on if i'm comfortable with my entry speed. After apex I try to do a nice smooth roll on while standing the bike up. Obviously not wide open, but I pinch it a little every now and then. Anyway, all this is really quick to me still, and I don't always get my mind to practice them every corner. Usually I focus on one thing at a time, like looking thru turn, or throttle inputs. What should I be working on as I go through corners? or maybe I should be working on my line building? :dunce:
 

·
Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Foot/leg position and keeping your arms bent.

Its hard to not sit in the middle of the seat on a streetbike ride because the track is the complete opposite. But you can practice setting your leg position to negotiate a turn so by the time you get on track it will be muscle memory.
 

·
Hey...watch this
Joined
·
574 Posts
Something that too many of us forget to practice is breaking. This is not something you want to learn how to do with a car turning left in front of you. I believe it was Keith Code that said 'If you ride 100MPH you need to know how to stop from 100MPH'.

Practice panic stops often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Foot/leg position and keeping your arms bent.

Its hard to not sit in the middle of the seat on a streetbike ride because the track is the complete opposite. But you can practice setting your leg position to negotiate a turn so by the time you get on track it will be muscle memory.
I sit my junk about 3 inches from the tank. Can't wait to get some stompgrip or something.. hard af to stop from sliding during braking.
What I do is flap my arms every so often just to make sure my arms are loose.
By setting leg position, do you mean hooking my outside thigh into the tank?


Something that too many of us forget to practice is breaking. This is not something you want to learn how to do with a car turning left in front of you. I believe it was Keith Code that said 'If you ride 100MPH you need to know how to stop from 100MPH'.

Practice panic stops often.
I definitely need to practice this more. What I consciously do now is slowly grab the front brake and by slowly I mean pulling firmly until the front end compresses and then pull harder. Takes about 1 second to do.. sound about right?
 

·
Reads the rulez
Joined
·
2,245 Posts

·
Sherman Connoisseur
Joined
·
26,449 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Don't forget to be smooth releasing the brakes as well.
I find myself occasionally holding on to the front brake going into some corners.. solid braking upright and then releasing to maybe about 5-10% braking and then leaning.. but I found some articles on trail braking and they mention tapering off AS you add lean angle. Is there a right and wrong way? or maybe one is better suited for the track?

http://www.r6-forum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=294289&page=3

I gave some advice in this thread you might want to check out. Too lazy to rewrite everything. I'm not so sure how helpful it would be since you are new, but check it out and if it helps, awesome! :D
Awesome.. thank you ima go thru this thread and take notes! :menace
 

·
Make good choices.
Joined
·
2,808 Posts
I find myself occasionally holding on to the front brake going into some corners.. solid braking upright and then releasing to maybe about 5-10% braking and then leaning.. but I found some articles on trail braking and they mention tapering off AS you add lean angle. Is there a right and wrong way? or maybe one is better suited for the track?
That sounds like you just said the same thing two different ways.

Release brake pressure as you add lean angle. How much braking vs how much lean angle and when will depend on the corner.
 

·
Meh
Joined
·
9,250 Posts
I find myself occasionally holding on to the front brake going into some corners.. solid braking upright and then releasing to maybe about 5-10% braking and then leaning.. but I found some articles on trail braking and they mention tapering off AS you add lean angle. Is there a right and wrong way? or maybe one is better suited for the track?



Awesome.. thank you ima go thru this thread and take notes! :menace
How much you trail brake tends to depend on the corner. It can definitely be useful on the street. It's good to have experience with it if you get into a corner too hot, or misjudge the shape of the corner, turn in too early, etc.

For your typical constant radius, or increasing radius turn you should try to get your braking done while the bike is upright, get the bike turning in just as you're getting off the brakes completely.

If it's a decreasing radius turn (it gets tighter after your initial turn-in) you'll often let off the brakes slower, and continue to carry some brake pressure later into the corner. You always want to make sure you modulate the brake pressure relative to your lean angle though - as you lean further, you need to be easing off the brakes. You've never got the brake lever fully squeezed while you're on the side of the tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
How much you trail brake tends to depend on the corner. It can definitely be useful on the street. It's good to have experience with it if you get into a corner too hot, or misjudge the shape of the corner, turn in too early, etc.

For your typical constant radius, or increasing radius turn you should try to get your braking done while the bike is upright, get the bike turning in just as you're getting off the brakes completely.

If it's a decreasing radius turn (it gets tighter after your initial turn-in) you'll often let off the brakes slower, and continue to carry some brake pressure later into the corner. You always want to make sure you modulate the brake pressure relative to your lean angle though - as you lean further, you need to be easing off the brakes. You've never got the brake lever fully squeezed while you're on the side of the tire.
So basically, for constant radius turns or turns I can see the exit for, try to time release of brakes with initial tip in; and for decreasing radius, or possibly unknown turns, keep or modulate some brake pressure going into the turn? Maybe i'm overanalyzing this lol :hammer
 

·
Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
So basically, for constant radius turns or turns I can see the exit for, try to time release of brakes with initial tip in; and for decreasing radius, or possibly unknown turns, keep or modulate some brake pressure going into the turn? Maybe i'm overanalyzing this lol :hammer
youre over thinking. First off "unknown" street corners shouldn't be approached with any serious speed for the "unknown" factor. On a track, there are no "suprise" corners unless you have serious short term memory loss. :D

You can trail brake on the street to a certain degree... but nothing like you can on a closed course.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top