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My R6 will eat yours.
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I'm riding between about 50-65 mph I get a hand numbing vibration in my bars. I've checked all the pinch bolts and mounting bolts I can think of, is it just because its a 600 buzz box!! I've seen grips that claim to fix this and dampeners that go inside the bars. What do you guys think is my best fix, and or is there something else I could check. Thanks.
 

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My R6 will eat yours.
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you putting all your weight on your wrists when you ride?
No, most of the time it's on the freeway and I'm just cruising, so it's pretty relaxed riding.
 

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Riding his own ride...
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4,639 Posts
Definitely try and keep weight off your wrists.

Other then that heavier bar ends as people said and also softer gel grips will help a lot. The downside to the grips is that the softer they are the faster they wear out. Driven's grips and Renthals medium grip both are a good combo between longevity and being very soft. If you have aftermarket clipons that are hollow and you use universal bar ends you can also fill the tubes with weight or material that absorbs vibrations.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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2,271 Posts
Bar ends are a MASK. They do not eliminate the problem. They only make the problem better. Grips are different in that they provide for better or worse feedback. Thinner less tacky grips allow for great bar feedback with reduced comfort. Thicker, more tacky grips allow for more comfort at the cost of bar feedback. By feedback I mean road input and tire traction warnings and such. Renthall grips are the best in my opinion and the diamond pattern superbike style is great regardless of how " sticky " they are. I use a hard grip compound and have not noticed a loss of tackyness. The Driven grips are very similar to the Renthall in that they have the same diamond grip design, however they are a thicker grip which will add some comfort.

About grip design. Most people don't think about grips much unless they want to " accessorize " their bike. They buy a grip that looks cool, says it will make them a better rider, or cure some issue. In reality a grip is more than that. Thick grips are easier to make the throttle twist due to leverage and depending upon compound can be made to be more or less comfortable. Thinner grips require more grip on the throttle and bar feedback is usually better. The effort to twist the throttle with a thinner grip is minimal and negligible as compared to the thicker ones though. You may not even notice the difference. The grip compounds ( what the grip is made of ) is mostly hype. The grip is either soft and gooey or hard. The grip pattern has no effect on grip in reality, as it's the glove, hand and grip compound that make for the resulted grip traction. It is important to keep grips clean for that reason. Grease, grime, dirt and other such things will reduce grip tackyness and you will have to hold on harder to twist it. The thinner grips will give a more controlled feeling over the bike and are really good for those with small hands. Thicker grips are great for less fatigue since your hand will not wrap around it as much.

Bar ends are not a motorcycle requirement. The bar end was designed more or less to finish the look of the bar and provide protection for the bar in the event of a tip over or crash. The weighted bar end does have the ability to DAMPEN the vibration of the bar. Some bar ends are even filled with lead shoot, fluid or other things to help reduce bar vibration. The weight of the bar end effects it's damping ability. Sometimes heavier is not always better. Even eliminating the bar ends, if they are weighted, can make vibration better. Don't buy into they cure this or that though. They are 90% aesthetic, the other 10% is split between actually reducing vibration and real crash protection. Most bar ends don't survive a crash and in most cases the bar gets bent or breaks.

The best way to eliminate bar vibration that would be considered excessive is to find the cause, or source of the issue. There will always be some amount of vibration in the bars. They will never not vibrate. If it is worse at some rpm's it is usually because of a frequency that is resonating through the machine and is felt through the bars. Things like loose bolts, or an engine that isn't very well tuned can cause those issues. If the bars vibrate pretty much the same all the time, it is highly likely that it will never be much better. The line in the sand is drawn by whether it is excessive, or just vibrating.

As was mentioned you should first be sure that all parts are tight and not able to vibrate loosely and that you engine is properly tuned. New spark plugs don't always fix things but are suggested for replacement every 8,000 miles on our bikes. The throttle body sync is highly important to a smooth running engine. It can be done by just about anyone and could solve " excessive " vibration.

The need for bar ends, and crazy grips that promise to cure everything are basically B.S. The most common issue to cause numbness in the hands and sore wrists is very simple. The bike is not meant for long distance upright riding. It puts you in a very weight forward position that places much of your weight on your hands and wrists. If you spend lots of time upright bearing your weight down on your wrists, they will get sore. The numb fingers are caused by having too much of a grip on the bars. The cure is to relax your grip. The throttle hand is always going to be an issue, but with practice and some time you can eliminate numb fingers on the right hand as well. Time means lots of riding over the course of a year. Not just tooling around once every couple of weeks. If you goo out every weekend for 6 months to a year you will notice it getting better. It is a time thing for the numb fingers and sore wrists.
 

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My R6 will eat yours.
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the info, I'll start with the plugs and sync. Thanks again
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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2,498 Posts
Bar ends are a MASK. They do not eliminate the problem. They only make the problem better. Grips are different in that they provide for better or worse feedback. Thinner less tacky grips allow for great bar feedback with reduced comfort. Thicker, more tacky grips allow for more comfort at the cost of bar feedback. By feedback I mean road input and tire traction warnings and such. Renthall grips are the best in my opinion and the diamond pattern superbike style is great regardless of how " sticky " they are. I use a hard grip compound and have not noticed a loss of tackyness. The Driven grips are very similar to the Renthall in that they have the same diamond grip design, however they are a thicker grip which will add some comfort.

About grip design. Most people don't think about grips much unless they want to " accessorize " their bike. They buy a grip that looks cool, says it will make them a better rider, or cure some issue. In reality a grip is more than that. Thick grips are easier to make the throttle twist due to leverage and depending upon compound can be made to be more or less comfortable. Thinner grips require more grip on the throttle and bar feedback is usually better. The effort to twist the throttle with a thinner grip is minimal and negligible as compared to the thicker ones though. You may not even notice the difference. The grip compounds ( what the grip is made of ) is mostly hype. The grip is either soft and gooey or hard. The grip pattern has no effect on grip in reality, as it's the glove, hand and grip compound that make for the resulted grip traction. It is important to keep grips clean for that reason. Grease, grime, dirt and other such things will reduce grip tackyness and you will have to hold on harder to twist it. The thinner grips will give a more controlled feeling over the bike and are really good for those with small hands. Thicker grips are great for less fatigue since your hand will not wrap around it as much.

Bar ends are not a motorcycle requirement. The bar end was designed more or less to finish the look of the bar and provide protection for the bar in the event of a tip over or crash. The weighted bar end does have the ability to DAMPEN the vibration of the bar. Some bar ends are even filled with lead shoot, fluid or other things to help reduce bar vibration. The weight of the bar end effects it's damping ability. Sometimes heavier is not always better. Even eliminating the bar ends, if they are weighted, can make vibration better. Don't buy into they cure this or that though. They are 90% aesthetic, the other 10% is split between actually reducing vibration and real crash protection. Most bar ends don't survive a crash and in most cases the bar gets bent or breaks.

The best way to eliminate bar vibration that would be considered excessive is to find the cause, or source of the issue. There will always be some amount of vibration in the bars. They will never not vibrate. If it is worse at some rpm's it is usually because of a frequency that is resonating through the machine and is felt through the bars. Things like loose bolts, or an engine that isn't very well tuned can cause those issues. If the bars vibrate pretty much the same all the time, it is highly likely that it will never be much better. The line in the sand is drawn by whether it is excessive, or just vibrating.

As was mentioned you should first be sure that all parts are tight and not able to vibrate loosely and that you engine is properly tuned. New spark plugs don't always fix things but are suggested for replacement every 8,000 miles on our bikes. The throttle body sync is highly important to a smooth running engine. It can be done by just about anyone and could solve " excessive " vibration.

The need for bar ends, and crazy grips that promise to cure everything are basically B.S. The most common issue to cause numbness in the hands and sore wrists is very simple. The bike is not meant for long distance upright riding. It puts you in a very weight forward position that places much of your weight on your hands and wrists. If you spend lots of time upright bearing your weight down on your wrists, they will get sore. The numb fingers are caused by having too much of a grip on the bars. The cure is to relax your grip. The throttle hand is always going to be an issue, but with practice and some time you can eliminate numb fingers on the right hand as well. Time means lots of riding over the course of a year. Not just tooling around once every couple of weeks. If you goo out every weekend for 6 months to a year you will notice it getting better. It is a time thing for the numb fingers and sore wrists.
+1...just using heavier bar ends and different grips to cover the problem is the same as putting air in your tire to fix a slow leak. it doesnt mean the problem is completely solved. it ust means you made a band aid for it. whatever was causing it in the first place will get worse, and then you may REALLY be in trouble.

op, it looks like youre making the right choice by just trying to solve things outright. an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. nip it in the bud.
 

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2 wheels 1 love
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1,212 Posts
+1...just using heavier bar ends and different grips to cover the problem is the same as putting air in your tire to fix a slow leak. It doesnt mean the problem is completely solved. It ust means you made a band aid for it. Whatever was causing it in the first place will get worse, and then you may really be in trouble.

Op, it looks like youre making the right choice by just trying to solve things outright. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Nip it in the bud.
+1:)
 
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