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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just wondering what is the best way to learn how to wheelie. This is how I was told to try: start in first go around 20-30mph, pull in clutch, punch it, let out clutch (all in one smooth motion/really quick).

If this is wrong, please help me out. I tried this the other day and it wasnt coming up. Should I be transfering my weight back? I'm just afraid that I'll flip it right over. I just got this bike, and dont want to mess it up. Any help would be great.
 

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Its Only a 600?
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If you just got the bike man, you should probably get used to it before you try to wheelie. BUT when you get accustomed to it, the proper way is not to clutch but power wheelie. Check out this vid http://youtube.com/watch?v=qncPBZ9DRRk

Make sure that if your are going to attempt it, gear up and find a safe place. Take it slow, and don't try to much at one time, thats how you dump it. Watch for head shake as you set it down. But like i said in the beginning, if your not comfortable riding the bike, wheelies should not be your top priority.
 

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start with just trying to throttle it up and get your front wheel up

learn your bike first

showing off is what ****s people
 

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Team: Teletubby racing
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Simpliest way....ride your bike up to 9k, let off the throttle till your bike feels like the front is pushing down...then hit the throttle, the front end should slowly come up and progress from there.
 

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it might feel a little wobbly and weird when the front end comes up, don't panic. be ready for it.
 

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wat?
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If you just got the bike man, you should probably get used to it before you try to wheelie. BUT when you get accustomed to it, the proper way is not to clutch but power wheelie. Check out this vid http://youtube.com/watch?v=qncPBZ9DRRk

Make sure that if your are going to attempt it, gear up and find a safe place. Take it slow, and don't try to much at one time, thats how you dump it. Watch for head shake as you set it down. But like i said in the beginning, if your not comfortable riding the bike, wheelies should not be your top priority.
I'll say yes on the wait to learn wheelies.

But a big hearty NO on trying to power them up...

Why clutching wheelies is the best method for launching wheelies
Clutching is by far the best way to get wheelies up, regardless of whether the bike has enough power to power it up. While it does wear out clutch plates a little faster than normal, the difference is not significant. I also have never read about any major problems as the result of the extra tension on the drive train. There are many advantages to clutching wheelies vs. powering wheelies. 1. It allows you to wheelie bikes that don?t have enough power to power it up. 2. You can wheelie at lower rpm?s, and therefore slower speeds. This allows beginners to keep a wheelie up longer, with out being at the balance point. 3. The launch is more predictable. When powering a wheelie up, the front end comes up relatively slow. Then when the front end is about 3 feet off the ground, the front end jumps up very fast under full throttle, making for a scary and unpredictable launch. When clutching up wheelies right, the front jumps up close to the balance point. From there you just play with the throttle to fine adjust the height. After a little practice, clutching becomes very predictable and not frightening at all. 4. All of the pros that I know of clutch every wheelie. You want to be like them don?t you?

How to clutch wheelies
There are a couple different methods for clutching wheelies. I prefer the second method.
Method 1: First accelerate with the clutch engaged. Then, with the throttle still opened, pull in the clutch with one finger, to the point where the clutch disengages. With the engine still under throttle, quickly let the clutch back out as the tach is rising.
Method 2: Close the throttle, and then pull the clutch in all the way, with one finger. Then twist the throttle and dump the clutch.
When learning to clutch, only rev up the engine a little bit at first before letting out the clutch. This will give you the feel for clutching. Then gradually increase the rpm?s before dumping the clutch, until the front end jumps up close to the balance point. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point. If it comes up too far, gently push the rear brake to bring the bike back forward. When clutching second and third gear wheelies, the bike may need extra help, depending on what bike it is. If clutching alone doesn?t get the wheelie up, then bounce at the same time. This is done by pushing down on the bike (with your arms and legs) at the same time you open the throttle, and then leaning back slightly when dropping the clutch. I is not a good idea to pull on the bars. Pulling up on the bars may cause the wheelie to come up funny and wobble.


Shifting gears
I don?t recommend shifting gears during a wheelie unless you are good at wheelies, and are able to use the clutch in the process. Otherwise, shifting during wheelies is hard on the transmission. It is also hard on the fork seals if you miss a shift. My advice is to learn to ride wheelies at a constant speed. Then there will be no need to shift.


How to set a wheelie down
When bringing down a wheelie, stay on the throttle until the front end is safely on the ground. If it is necessary to quickly bring down the front end, then close the throttle at first. Then as the front is coming down, open the throttle. In that way you will have a soft landing.

Step by step procedure to launch a wheelie for a beginner
1. Drop the tire pressure to about 15-20psi
2. Put the bike into first gear
3. Go about 15mph
4. Pull in the clutch
5. Rev up the engine a little and drop the clutch
6. Repeat step 5, increasing the rpm?s, until the front end comes up close to the balance point.
7. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point.
8. Cover the rear brake.
9. Stay on the throttle as it comes back down.

Balancing the wheelie from front to back
Balancing front to back is controlled by using the throttle and rear brake. It is a good idea to learn this on a quad, fiddy, or dirtbike first. If the wheelie is in front of the balance point, you must increase your speed to remain at that position. To get the wheelie back to the balance point, you must compensate with more throttle. This is the same, only in reverse, when the wheelie is behind the balance point. When behind the balance point, you must use the engine breaking/ rear brake to bring it forward to the balance point. The balance point is the position of the bike in which it neither has to speed up or slow down to remain at the same position. The height of the balance point is affected mainly by the speed of the wheelie. The faster the wheelie is, the lower the balance point. The balance point is also slightly affected by the weight distribution of the bike and the position of the rider. The object of riding a balanced wheelie is to keep the bike as close as possible to the balance point. This is done by rolling on and off the throttle, and pushing the brake if needed. With practice comes the ability to ride a smooth wheelie with out playing with the throttle/brake much.

Balancing the wheelie from side to side
Balancing sided to side is done by adjusting your body position. It is a good idea to learn this on a dirtbike, bicycle, or fiddy first. When riding wheelies over about 20mph, the bike will balance itself for the most part. It is the slow wheelies that you have to consciously balance side to side. The principle is pretty simple. Quickly lean the same direction as the bike is falling. For example, if the bike is starting to fall to the right, you would quickly lean to the left. This movement would twist the bike towards the left, thereby correcting it.

Preventing / stopping wheelie wobbles
From my experience, I think that high speed wheelie wobbles can be caused by having a squared off rear tire, not being smooth on the throttle, and/or making quick movements. Slow speed wobbles seems to be caused by high rear tire pressure, and/or not keeping the wheelie balanced from side to side.

Steering wheelies
To steer wheelies good, you need to either be at the balance point, or behind the balance point. To steer wheelies which are over about 20mph, you simply slowly lean in the direction you want to turn. However, to turn slow wheelies, you must first make the bike lean in the direction which you want to turn. For example, if you want to turn to the right, first, slowly lean to the right. Then quickly lean a little to the left / twist the handlebars a little to the left. This will cause the bike to start to fall to the right. Then, instead of completely correcting the lean, you keep the bike leaning at that angle. This will cause the bike to turn to the right.

Using the rear brake: Slowing wheelies down / 12s
Wheelies are slowed down by riding the wheelie behind the balance point. This is one of the hardest parts of learning to wheelie, not because of skill, but because of the balls required. To learn how to use the rear brake, you basically need to grow some balls, bring the wheelie up behind the balance point, and tap the brake. Soon this process will become second nature. To slow a wheelie down, you must give the bike enough throttle to get the wheelie behind the balance point. Now if you get scared and push the rear break hard at this point, it will quickly bring the wheelie forward without slowing it down much. To slow it down, you must keep it behind the balance point by gently riding the brake. To 12, you just do the same thing, only you get off the rear break enough to allow the bike to lean back on the tail. Unless you plan on parking a 12, make sure you get back on the brake before the wheelie slows down enough to stall the engine.

Riding slow wheelies
After you get good at slowing down wheelies, then you should be able to ride slow wheelies out. First of all, turn up your idle. I do slow stuff with the idle at 3.5k rpm?s. The high idle allows you to ride slow wheelies much smoother. Be careful, however, when first turning up the idle, because you will have to use the rear brake, when going slow, to keep from looping. When riding slow wheelies with the idle high, with some practice, you should be able to ride the wheelie by using the brake, and only blipping the throttle if the wheelie starts to come down.

Once you have learned all of this, all of the wheelie variations will pretty much be self explanatory.
 

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I totally disagree with learning wheelies by clutching them up. You first need to feel calm when you are on one wheel. Powering up provides the rider learning a 'slow rise' of the front end. Only move beyond a slight rise if you feel comfy doing that.
Clutching it up happens so quick that it can be hard to make adjustments- especially to someone learning. You need to be able to get over that "Oh, shiite" feeling that intially happens. Stick with it slow, and power it up. Clutchin' for a beginner = potential 12 o'clock disaster. IMO
 

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Just Burnin Time
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^ everyone can say what they will but i totally 100% agree with you.

I have been riding for years, have 9k on my new bike and love the track. Always told myself i wouldnt wheelie plain and simply cause i dont want to **** my bike up like that. Lately i have been playing around doing easy power wheelies and now clutching it is so much more comfortable for me. I still prefer to bounce the front up but i can clutch it as well, to me bouncing it is so much smother and controlled. when doing wheelies, it is a personal preference on whats best for you.
 

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Its Only a 600?
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:stupic , nice post man.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry its been awhile since I posted this, and just now remembered. Thanks to everyone who helped out. I do want to say that I am totally comfortable on my bike. I just dont want anything to happen to my bike because I never really tried to wheelie before. I want to read as much as possible before I go out and do what I've learned.

There have been a couple ways you all have said to try out. I'm going to try both, see what's up after that.

Thanks again
-m0nkey
 

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Hit It and Quit It
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I'm just wondering what is the best way to learn how to wheelie. This is how I was told to try: start in first go around 20-30mph, pull in clutch, punch it, let out clutch (all in one smooth motion/really quick).

If this is wrong, please help me out. I tried this the other day and it wasnt coming up. Should I be transfering my weight back? I'm just afraid that I'll flip it right over. I just got this bike, and dont want to mess it up. Any help would be great.

If you need to ask how. then you are not ready.
Don't Rush IT.......
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have had my bike for just about a year now. I am very used to it, how it handles, what it feels like, and what happens when I do certain things. I tried to clutch it up in 1st after posting the last time in this thread. I was taking it slow, progressively getting higher and higher each time. Then I got a little frustrated and gave it quite a bit more throttle than the last time, and almost did a 12oclock. I panicked because it rose up so fast, I wasn’t expecting it to go that hard. I hit my back break and it came back down without anything happening, thank god. After that happened, I thought I had enough of trying it out for awhile. I didn’t want to push my luck. :)

That was a few weeks ago now. Since then, I have met quite a few people who ride sport bikes. I got most of their numbers so we could ride. One has a Gixxer 750, I ride with him most of the time. He has been explaining things better for me, and telling me what I’m doing wrong. Whenever he is doing them, its always in second (sometimes in 3rd if he is bouncing them). What he is doing is going about 50ish, pulling in the clutch, giving it full throttle, then letting out the clutch as his hand is the whole way down. I have been trying them this way. After the near 12 in 1st gear, it seems better to try them in second. It’s not coming up as fast. The other day, all we were doing every time there was a straight stretch is trying to wheelie. I have been getting it higher every time, but I’m not getting it to hold in the air. I think I might be letting off the throttle just enough for it to just come back down. At first I was thinking about his bike being a tad bigger than mine, and maybe the 6 can’t do it in second. (Correct me if I’m wrong!)

If anyone else has any pointers, or maybe can help on what I might be doing wrong please post up. Thanks in advance.


-m0nkey
 
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