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Discussion Starter #22
Experience, either direct or vicarious, can be the cause of fear as well.
Meaning that sometimes having knowledge about something or experience with something can actually cause more fear than not? Would a crash be an example of that? If you haven't crashed, maybe you don't fear crashing as much but if you did crash and get really hurt then there may be more fear because of it?

If that's the case, how do we get over (or continue to ride) when we have experienced bad things when riding?
 

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Meaning that sometimes having knowledge about something or experience with something can actually cause more fear than not? Would a crash be an example of that? If you haven't crashed, maybe you don't fear crashing as much but if you did crash and get really hurt then there may be more fear because of it?

If that's the case, how do we get over (or continue to ride) when we have experienced bad things when riding?
I actually have less fear of crashing now that I've had several opportunities to experience it. Common knowledge says if you crash a motorcycle at 100mph you will die. I know people who do it about once a week. I've done it a few times, and didn't die. (I did get really hurt one time) Now my only fear of crashing is what it is going to cost to fix me and my bike, so I can go crash again.

Misti, you can't possibly be as nervous or afraid as you come across. Whether you are or not...either way...PLEASE get yourself to a trackday. Then come back and tell us how much fun you had and how you worried for nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I actually have less fear of crashing now that I've had several opportunities to experience it. Common knowledge says if you crash a motorcycle at 100mph you will die. I know people who do it about once a week. I've done it a few times, and didn't die. (I did get really hurt one time) Now my only fear of crashing is what it is going to cost to fix me and my bike, so I can go crash again.

Misti, you can't possibly be as nervous or afraid as you come across. Whether you are or not...either way...PLEASE get yourself to a trackday. Then come back and tell us how much fun you had and how you worried for nothing.

Thank you for your concern :grin: I'm actually a coach with the California Superbike School and a Moto journalist (former AMA Pro 600 racer as well). When I'm not riding I like to post questions and initiate conversation on various forums in hopes of helping people to learn something new and pay more attention to their own riding. I definitely have lots of fun at track days and am not nervous myself, I just like to really understand where fear arises and how my students can overcome their own fears, mainly by learning and truly understanding good riding technique. I posted a link (above) to my most recent track day experience, riding Aragon in Spain in October last year. The video is onboard with me, my first day riding the track as part of the Race Academy school with Troy Corser.
 

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Meaning that sometimes having knowledge about something or experience with something can actually cause more fear than not? Would a crash be an example of that? If you haven't crashed, maybe you don't fear crashing as much but if you did crash and get really hurt then there may be more fear because of it?

If that's the case, how do we get over (or continue to ride) when we have experienced bad things when riding?

The reason I say this, is the fact that sooo many people in conversations about m'cycles, have shared stories with me about why they quit riding. I'm a little surprised to find that sooo many people who really don't ride, have ridden before. Many quit riding either due to direct or indirect experiences. Some have just come out and stated that it wasn't for them.



What anyone does with such experiences is totally upon the individual. Same people can look at the same story book verses and have completely opposite viewpoints or interpretations. Same people can look at the accomplishments and scandals of two totally different presidents and (profess to) have wildly different outlooks on them.



Also I suspect that regardless of how much they may say otherwise, like a football player coming off a major injury, the first ride after a crash is going to be a bit more reserved. (possible exceptions being these types of conditions - (http://www.nbcnews.com/id/6379795/ns/health-childrens_health/t/rare-disease-makes-girl-unable-feel-pain/) But there are folks who are just plain crazy. They'll wreck their bike and try to wreck yours too - if you let'em.
 

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Meaning that even if you are making the correct adjustments, you still can't regain control?
Like say you are leaned over and the front starts to wash out because the road section was slippery. It regains after but that moment of losing grip is a heart dropper.
 

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Currently still nursing a broken thumb from a recent accident, so for me, the biggest fear is re-injury or suffering another injury more severe than just a broken thumb. I think it's a good learning/humbling experience for me. Before the accident, I felt like I was confident enough to do anything on the bike. I was commuting to and from work and having the bike was a great way to break up the monotony of the daily commute plus being in CA we can lane split so another added benefit.

Looking forward to riding again, but for sure will take it a bit slower and respect the bike and not be too overconfident in my abilities.
 

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Currently still nursing a broken thumb from a recent accident, so for me, the biggest fear is re-injury or suffering another injury more severe than just a broken thumb. I think it's a good learning/humbling experience for me. Before the accident, I felt like I was confident enough to do anything on the bike. I was commuting to and from work and having the bike was a great way to break up the monotony of the daily commute plus being in CA we can lane split so another added benefit.

Looking forward to riding again, but for sure will take it a bit slower and respect the bike and not be too overconfident in my abilities.
Some people just don't understand it's more than just years of riding normally. It's understanding the limits and being under it. I've stopped arguing with people because it's a waste of time. It doesn't matter if you have One week of experience. If you can ride better in one moment or many moments than people with 10-50+ years of experience you win. I know it's not that people want to hear but I'm different.
 

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Some people just don't understand it's more than just years of riding normally. It's understanding the limits and being under it. I've stopped arguing with people because it's a waste of time. It doesn't matter if you have One week of experience. If you can ride better in one moment or many moments than people with 10-50+ years of experience you win. I know it's not that people want to hear but I'm different.
I have no idea what this means.
And I am good with that.
 

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Briefly, how did this happen? Bad lane change? Obstacle in the road?
Was in the carpool lane about to pass the car in front of me when the driver decided to flash their turn signal and change lanes immediately after. I braked to avoid getting hit and the next thing I knew I was I tumbling and ended up in the 3rd lane from the carpool lane and my bike skidded and ended up in the second lane a couple of feet ahead of me.

All things considered, I was lucky I didn't get run over from behind and my bike didn't hit another car. Injury wise only sustained a broken thumb as I was wearing full gear so once again another friendly reminder to always wear all your gear. I'd like to consider myself a pretty conservative rider but at the end of the day what freaks me out is all the "distracted" drivers out there. Just takes one bad driver to ruin your day, which sucks for us riders.
 

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Some people just don't understand it's more than just years of riding normally. It's understanding the limits and being under it. I've stopped arguing with people because it's a waste of time. It doesn't matter if you have One week of experience. If you can ride better in one moment or many moments than people with 10-50+ years of experience you win. I know it's not that people want to hear but I'm different.
Couldn't agree more. Hopefully, when i start riding again the goal is to string together as many ride better moments as possible.
 

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Was in the carpool lane about to pass the car in front of me when the driver decided to flash their turn signal and change lanes immediately after. I braked to avoid getting hit and the next thing I knew I was I tumbling and ended up in the 3rd lane from the carpool lane and my bike skidded and ended up in the second lane a couple of feet ahead of me.

All things considered, I was lucky I didn't get run over from behind and my bike didn't hit another car. Injury wise only sustained a broken thumb as I was wearing full gear so once again another friendly reminder to always wear all your gear. I'd like to consider myself a pretty conservative rider but at the end of the day what freaks me out is all the "distracted" drivers out there. Just takes one bad driver to ruin your day, which sucks for us riders.
Okay so it was a bad lane change. This is among the top factors in most wrecks, even for those on four to eighteen wheels. I'm learning from your shared experience.


As riders we have to ride as though any and every potential wreck is our fault; because regardless of who is at fault, we loose, 100% of the time. (well, 99.9% anyway - https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=biker+kicks+car&&view=detail&mid=883EC2BE78ED46E43203883EC2BE78ED46E43203&rvsmid=2D42FC95F0A58AA5DF692D42FC95F0A58AA5DF69&FORM=VDQVAP)



One mistake I see that is common among riders, is their lane-shift. Instinctively we want to ride as far away from the car as possible. But when we're lane shifted away from the car, they can't see us. If they can't see us, they can't avoid us. Overwhelming majority of drivers want to avoid wrecks. We're more likely to be seen when riding closer to their mirror. That being said, I also pay special attention to rapid lane changers. When they change lanes, we may not have adequate time to get out of the way. Another tip, I spend nearly all of my riding time in either the far left, or far right lane. That way I only have to worry about being seen by one lane, instead of two. Know where peoples' blind spots are and try to spend as little time as is reasonable traversing them.
 

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Some people just don't understand it's more than just years of riding normally. It's understanding the limits and being under it. I've stopped arguing with people because it's a waste of time. It doesn't matter if you have One week of experience. If you can ride better in one moment or many moments than people with 10-50+ years of experience you win. I know it's not what people want to hear but I'm different.

I had to correct that to what. My mistake.
 

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One mistake I see that is common among riders, is their lane-shift. Instinctively we want to ride as far away from the car as possible. But when we're lane shifted away from the car, they can't see us. If they can't see us, they can't avoid us. Overwhelming majority of drivers want to avoid wrecks. We're more likely to be seen when riding closer to their mirror. That being said, I also pay special attention to rapid lane changers. When they change lanes, we may not have adequate time to get out of the way. Another tip, I spend nearly all of my riding time in either the far left, or far right lane. That way I only have to worry about being seen by one lane, instead of two. Know where peoples' blind spots are and try to spend as little time as is reasonable traversing them.
Yes I'd agree on riding closer to the car to stay outside the blind spot area but I think in this case considering how the car changed lanes so suddenly had I not kept my distance and braked before it happened I would have for sure been hit and don't want to image the damage I would have sustained.
 
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