Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey dudes, I want to upgrade my levers on my 2004 R6, any suggestions on a good pair? Everything I find is from China.., cheers
 

·
Fat + S = Fast
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Pazzo levers are the classic, and what all the Chink levers are knocking off. ASV are also nice. There's lots to choose from, just be prepared to spend 60-100 dollars per lever for non-Chinese goods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,137 Posts
Hang on to your OEM. Thirty minutes or longer of holding on to those shorty clutch levers in traffic, may have that left hand aching for the leverage provided by the longer OEM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
I pound out commutes on the R6 in Baltimore/DC metro traffic- as far as holding the clutch compares between the RC2 and OEM levers, its about the same. Lots easier to get the right grip and lever distance with the CRG's. OTOH for real shortie levers are probably a different thing entirely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hang on to your OEM. Thirty minutes or longer of holding on to those shorty clutch levers in traffic, may have that left hand aching for the leverage provided by the longer OEM.
My hands are aching already from my OEM lol, guess I just gotta get used to it
 

·
COLOSSUS206
Joined
·
25 Posts
I’ve always used ASV levers. They are pricey but strong, look nice, and ASV will customize them to your liking. I’m using their C5 levers with gold adjusters with my R6. Adds a little more gold accent to my bike without looking gaudy.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: DonDiablo333

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,991 Posts
My hands are aching already from my OEM lol, guess I just gotta get used to it
funny thing... the OEM levers are smooth and provide the best feel & leverage under hard riding/racing conditions. If youre just putting around on the street... wont really matter.
The problem with buying "China" levers is they are incorrectly machined. So it wont allow your master cylinder plunger to retract 100%. Usually only 90%... so that means your brakes will drag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I've got MZS levers bought off eBay on both my bikes I changed levers on. I think the quality is pretty good. They have better leverage than stock, so, despite being marginally shorter, they are easier to pull. I expect them to wear out a little sooner than the really good ones that have actual needle bearings at the pivots, but the stock levers did just fine without that sort of thing and I can buy three sets of these before I've spent the money on one set of really nice ones. Very happy with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
If your hands are aching, you are probably just doing too much with your hands. Grip the tank with your knees and take weight off your arms. You don't need to hold onto handlebars hardly at all. Seriously, I used to hold onto them like that is what kept me on the bike. Now I go around turns on the track just basically using my fingertips. If I want full throttle, I pull my hand back more than roll my wrist down. A cramp buster also helps you maintain throttle with a light grip. Cleaning the grips to get rid of any oil on them also means you don't have to hold on so tightly when you do hold on. At a stop you shouldn't be on the levers at all. Depending on gear, you have plenty of choices of speed at which you can idle. Maybe someone does a ton of stop and go traffic on their bike, and I just don't, but I don't see getting tired from holding the levers. Consider lubricating or replacing your cables if the clutch or throttle seems hard to move.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
566 Posts
Shorty oem.. it's ok but can't adjust where the lever rests. Oems never spend the extra $5 for adjusting the clutch. Cheap asses!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,137 Posts
Rotate your clutch and brake levers on the bars, into positions that are comfortable for you. For me, the clutch lever is rotated fairly higher than the brake; placing the lever closer to my palm when holding it in.

@haygood - I believe he was referring only to his left hand; and presumably only for holding, not moving. If it's just the left, posture likely isn't the issue. Knee gripping typically helps with the back and wrists; not really one aching hand. Gripping unnecessarily tight... like a full-time death grip, would cause both hands to ache.

Shorter handles typically sacrifice mechanical advantage (leverage).

374873


The spring diaphragms on many automobile clutches however, are designed with an easier hold versus push. In other words, resistance isn't linear. I'm not familiar with the internal design of the motorcycle clutch however. (I've not had to pull one apart.) Resistance seems to be more linear. The only ways I can see a shorter lever being easier to hold, is if it's designed with an irregularly shaped pulley, or if it's like cars, a longer pull... that is, pull the cable further out than it would ordinarily be.

Not all clutches have an equal amount of resistance. Not all palm sizes and finger lengths are the same size. Not everyone has their clutch lever rotated to their best position. Not everyone has the same hand-strength. These varying factors don't necessarily equate to mechanical issues with the bike. For new riders especially, it just takes some getting used to.

374880
 

Attachments

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
566 Posts
The r6 is a rather beefy clutch spring set stock to hold the power. Certainly needs finger exercises if new. Those hand things are a great idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
If your hands are aching, you are probably just doing too much with your hands. Grip the tank with your knees and take weight off your arms. You don't need to hold onto handlebars hardly at all. Seriously, I used to hold onto them like that is what kept me on the bike. Now I go around turns on the track just basically using my fingertips. If I want full throttle, I pull my hand back more than roll my wrist down. A cramp buster also helps you maintain throttle with a light grip. Cleaning the grips to get rid of any oil on them also means you don't have to hold on so tightly when you do hold on. At a stop you shouldn't be on the levers at all. Depending on gear, you have plenty of choices of speed at which you can idle. Maybe someone does a ton of stop and go traffic on their bike, and I just don't, but I don't see getting tired from holding the levers. Consider lubricating or replacing your cables if the clutch or throttle seems hard to move.
I keep three fingers over brake lever and two on my throttle because I’m a scared noob lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
My clutch hand does eventually get tired in the horrible DC metro gridlock, doesn't take long to recover once traffic resumes. Naturally shifting the bike to neutral to rest the hand means traffic starts moving again. Throttle and brake aren't a big deal in the traffic suck.. the R6 can poke along pretty well in 1st for the crawl. I rotate the levers down, so its as straight a line as I can make it along my arms through to the fingers- means fingers can quickly move between brake/clutch and grip without disturbing the hand position- helpful for throttle control.

Summers here are really humid- the sweaty stuck-in-traffic heatsoak on the R6 w/ the fan running flat out is gross.. I don't mind riding when its 95 out as long as the traffic doesn't stop, but for commutes I generally stop riding soon as its > 90F. July and August are about as bad as January and February, just opposite.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
566 Posts
Yeah, 115F dry sucks to ride in, glad I don't get a ton of monsoon humidity.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
566 Posts
105F today. Activetune was doing its thing nicely!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top