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Nothing Special
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am very new to R6 ownership, like a week new. I know my 2003 Gen2 is fuel injected, which generates this question....

Can a Gen2 be push started if the batt goes dead or goes bad out on the road? I know racers use "bump starters" to crank over full race machines, but those things get the rear wheel spinning pretty fast and produce a good deal of engine RPM. Push starting a bike is a totally different story, would you agree?

I doubt it can be push started. I mean, most FI vehicles are 100% controlled by some sort of ECU or ECM (or everwhat). Those computers normally won't even boot up if they do not see at least around 10.6vdc. Am I somewhere in the ballpark so far with the R6? If so, the likelihood of generating that kind of voltage (as well as the amperage required, these digital bikes draw some big juice) by only push starting the bike is little to none. At least that's been my experience with other FI'd bikes.

So, I've had this idea. With the advent of Lith-Ion batts with their higher power levels and light weight it seems to me one could put together an isolator system that would provide you with a "hot" battery that has enough power to bring the CPU online (therefor spark and fuel pump comes on line as well) and push start the bike. The L-Ion batt could be small enough to remain lightweight but just large enough to supply enough voltage/current to fire up the electronics and allow the engine to be bumped over in the event of a remote failure. The "bump start batt" wouldn't have to be very large at all, and these L-Ion batts are pretty easy to make using L-Ion cells (that's all they are inside of a "bike battery" anyhow, is just a number of 1.6vdc cells all wired together in series/parallel. More cells = more grunt and voltage depending on how you wire them up to each other).

As a sortof offshoot idea here, you may even build up a multi-pod battery setup using more than one L-Ion batt wired in series/parallel with other L-Ion batts. So if there's only enough room in some little niche on the bike for a few cells, you can add more cells to some other available space on the bike and wire the two "pods" together to create one total complete battery large enough to crank the bike over.

Ok, that's it. Just a weird idea I've had for decades. The "push start batt". Heheh.
 

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Nothing Special
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Amazing. And in these cases was the battery dead?

If so it is GREAT to hear that Yamaha really worked that out right. I've had a number of FI'd vehicles that simply could not be bumped if the batt was below 10.6 when under a starter load (hit the start button and voltage drops from "good" to "crap"). Three Hondas I've had, no way they were bumping with a batt lower than 10.6vdc.

So .. I guess ... um ... YAY! (right?). Thanks for the help. :)
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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dead batt. can cause all kinds of issues, especially if there is a bad cell, but all fi bikes can usually be push started. The stator puts out the vt to run injectors, spark, ecu, etc. If the stator goes, the bike will continue to run on battery power for a bit. At very high rpm, the bike will start to misfire as demand for vt and spark overloads supply.. lower revs the bike will run, till it doesn't. the 3rd gen especially, needs 14vt to run ideally, but the bike can be bump started in most cases as long as the charging system is working.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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2,498 Posts
I can't say if it was totally dead or not, but it was dead to the point that it wouldn't even get the starter motor to click at all. The gauges would occasionally power on, but that was it. I didn't have the cash for a new battery, so I just relied on push starting it and it never gave me any problems.
 
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