Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
My R6 eats you.
Joined
·
7,563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going with the -1/+2, but on some tracks I'll need to change to stock or even a -1 in the front. Obviously this will push the rear wheel back, does anyone know how significant this distance will be?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,458 Posts
not much - it wasn't even a complete "notch" on astebbs when we did the -1 up front on his. that's all he did at first, and there wasn't any noticable difference.

don't forget the speedoDRD. :D i know a guy. :sing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,864 Posts
what ^^^ said. the circumference of the sprocket is not noticeable enough to have to re-figure your geometry. I go by chain slack determined by rider weight vs. flex of the chain. This will take care of you sprocket to sprocket distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,864 Posts
Oh, well that is the norm I would think. But rider weight has absolutely nothing to do with chain tension. Tdub
A lot of people don't really know about setting up chain tension..sad, yes I know. I'm not sure I understand your last statement though. Say you take my bike and put me on there, I'm 230 lbs and then you take someone like Colin who weighs significantly less than I do. Would you not need to make adjustments to the chain??? I know suspension plays a big part as well but I've been told bigger guys would have a slightly shorter wheel base for the bike to be able to squat under compression of the chassis.
 

·
FastForward Performance
Joined
·
961 Posts
As the rear wheel swings thru it's arc, the chain is tightest at one point...when the C/S center, swingarm pivot center and rear axle center are on a common plane. This is where the chain should be adjusted to be at it's tightest (relative term).
As I am switching our race bikes over from the 600RR to the R6 for the upcoming season, I am unfamiliar with it's proper chain tension. So what I will do is when I have the shock off (to replace with our RaceTech shocks), I will place the rear wheel in the above position. Then I will adjust the chain to a snug, not binding, position. When I reinstall the new shock, I will make a note of easy reference of how loose the chain is when the bike is on the stand.
Normally and in most instances, I have found that if you take a finger and press the chain upward, it will just barely come in contact with the swingarm slider at it's most rearward location.
Again, no matter how much you weigh, when the rear wheel goes thru it's arc, it will pass thru it's tightest spot. Tdub
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,864 Posts
Very good info....answer me this real quick and I'll get out of your hair (as I have to go eat leftovers). From my previous post...do you need to make adjustments to the chain slack/tension for variances in rider weight. Or do you leave that as a control and just tinker with the suspension/sag and go from there. You obviously know your shit so I'm just wanting to gain a little more knowledge here. I'm always down for learning new tidbits.
 

·
FastForward Performance
Joined
·
961 Posts
Very good info....answer me this real quick and I'll get out of your hair (as I have to go eat leftovers). From my previous post...do you need to make adjustments to the chain slack/tension for variances in rider weight. Or do you leave that as a control and just tinker with the suspension/sag and go from there. You obviously know your shit so I'm just wanting to gain a little more knowledge here. I'm always down for learning new tidbits.
Chain tension has absolutely nothing to do with rider weight. If it is too tight, it will actually bind and not allow the suspension to work properly. Tdub

PS...were either of you guys at the last Hallett race with CMRA?
 

·
My R6 eats you.
Joined
·
7,563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As the rear wheel swings thru it's arc, the chain is tightest at one point...when the C/S center, swingarm pivot center and rear axle center are on a common plane. This is where the chain should be adjusted to be at it's tightest (relative term).
As I am switching our race bikes over from the 600RR to the R6 for the upcoming season, I am unfamiliar with it's proper chain tension. So what I will do is when I have the shock off (to replace with our RaceTech shocks), I will place the rear wheel in the above position. Then I will adjust the chain to a snug, not binding, position. When I reinstall the new shock, I will make a note of easy reference of how loose the chain is when the bike is on the stand.
Normally and in most instances, I have found that if you take a finger and press the chain upward, it will just barely come in contact with the swingarm slider at it's most rearward location.
Again, no matter how much you weigh, when the rear wheel goes thru it's arc, it will pass thru it's tightest spot. Tdub

Thanks for the great info, I think I've seen you over on the WERA boards, glad to have you over here too. I'm actually putting a racetech shock on my 6 as well, but I am replacing the spring that's on it now. With the RT preload adjustment collar I shouldn't need a spring compressor correct? Just use a spanner to twist the collar loose and remove the spring? Pic for reference:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,864 Posts
Chain tension has absolutely nothing to do with rider weight. If it is too tight, it will actually bind and not allow the suspension to work properly. Tdub

PS...were either of you guys at the last Hallett race with CMRA?
No....I think I'm only going to one Hallett race next year. Doubt I'll make both rounds.
 

·
crashing aint so bad
Joined
·
2,271 Posts
Thought I recognized you Tdub. Your from the WERA Forum correct. Your currently selling your CBR 600rr that is in the above pics right? I go over there very little, mostly for info research. Any way; welcome to the R6 forum.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top