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Gambling every time u rid
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I got a good deal on some EBC friction plates but no steel plates. I've looked around for EBC steel plates by themselves but haven't located any. But I have found some OEM ones. Would it be bad to use OEM plates with EBC friction plates? I couldn't see why not but I figured I'd ask. I know there are some track pros here. Mines mainly for street riding and mountain riding. Thanks!
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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So I got a good deal on some EBC friction plates but no steel plates. I've looked around for EBC steel plates by themselves but haven't located any. But I have found some OEM ones. Would it be bad to use OEM plates with EBC friction plates? I couldn't see why not but I figured I'd ask. I know there are some track pros here. Mines mainly for street riding and mountain riding. Thanks!
EBC fibers are sold separate, metals are not. They come in a full ebc kit. there is zero problem using the ebc fibers with your metals. Just ensure your metals are flat (put on a surface after wiping all the oil off and tap with your finger in a few spots, or use feeler gauge per the manual).
Make sure you put the metals back with the optional metals on the outside if you have optional metals. There are 2 optional sized metals that allow you to swap with the standard sized metals to make up the correct stack height for the clutch pack. The stack height is very important on 3rd gen bikes to make the slipper clutch work properly and engage properly. There are lots of posts on stack height..
 

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Gambling every time u rid
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
^Thanks Melk-Man. I'll take a better look at it tomorrow. I was actually asking if I could use brand new OEM plates, but looks like your saying I could use my original plates? Even if that's true I'd prefer to use brand new plates. Mine have about 38k miles.
 

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^Thanks Melk-Man. I'll take a better look at it tomorrow. I was actually asking if I could use brand new OEM plates, but looks like your saying I could use my original plates? Even if that's true I'd prefer to use brand new plates. Mine have about 38k miles.
Id check em for straightness on a piece of glass and glass bead them clean.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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as TB said, you can check the metals for true on a flat surface.. Fibers wear way before metals and it's not uncommon to go 2 sets of fibers to a set of metals. (this is why many there are many fiber only kits sold).
I personally use my thick glass dinette table in the kitchen :) Even if fairly blue/black in places, they could be just FINE. 38,000 miles on the street would NOT be hard on a clutch if a lot of it is highway miles. The clutch is engaged, no wear occurring at all. I replace my clutch once a season even if it doesn't need it, but i zip-tie the stack together as it's almost always still in spec stack height as a spare/loaner. That is with literally over 100 hard starts, lots of clutch slipping into countless corners, etc. They can take a beating if you aren't stupid with it..

Are you sure the clutch stack needs replace ? or are you just replacing due to the mileage concern? There is a stack height measurement spec in the manual (42.4-43mm i THINK), and you can measure each individual fiber (3mm is new, 2.85mm is min spec).
 

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Gambling every time u rid
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Turboblew and Melk_man! I've done a bit of searching and seems like you two know your shit. The plates are perfectly flat. A little bluing here and there and I measured them all together and come to about 42.78 mm. The way I look at it, the EBC fibers were in a package deal and the price was so low that basically the fibers were free. So even if doesn't last that long with the used plates I'll still be coming out on top. Again, I appreciate the info fellas!
 
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