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So I was torquing the clutch spring bolts down on my 2007r6s and one snapped. I don’t have a clue as to why. It was the correct torque spec(70.8 in lb. I read it may be because the bolts are old/stretched. Do u recommend replacing all bolts. and tightening again to the torque spec? Or should I just snug em till they stop spinning by hand? Cause there is like a point where they all seem to hit rock bottom on tightening and I think that’s where I should stop as tightening past this with the torque wrench is what snapped the damn thing. Any help is appreciated.
 

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YZFR6... ooodles of HP
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After 3 uses, I would throw away regardless of torque spec. You don't want head bolts or clutch pack bolts coming loose. Sometimes the svc manual specs oil, otherwise threads should be dry.
 
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After 3 uses, I would throw away regardless of torque spec. You don't want head bolts or clutch pack bolts coming loose. Sometimes the svc manual specs oil, otherwise threads should be dry.
Yeah I have no clue how many times they’ve been out so I guess it’s time to replace em all. And that makes a lot of sense. The threads most definitely had oil on em and I feel like a dumb ****. Thanks, I really appreciate it.
 

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Re-torque specifications for aluminum bolts too often seem unrealistic. They're aluminum, and they're soft.

Using the fairing fasteners as an example, I torque to what what I feel they'll handle (rather than the spec) and use blue thread-locker to keep them in place. (for the ones that actually have issue with backing out anyway)

With specific regard to the clutch spring bolt, I have no experience and therefore can't comment.
 

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Re-torque specifications for aluminum bolts too often seem unrealistic. They're aluminum, and they're soft.

Using the fairing fasteners as an example, I torque to what what I feel they'll handle (rather than the spec) and use blue thread-locker to keep them in place. (for the ones that actually have issue with backing out anyway)

With specific regard to the clutch spring bolt, I have no experience and therefore can't comment.
Yup... clutch bolts are definitely much different than faring bolts lol. I also tighten those by feel because they really don’t matter too much.
 

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YZFR6... ooodles of HP
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Oil on the threads requires a reduction in torque. 20% or something.. I was rebuilding my zx9r and replaced the plugs.. at about $10 a pop I decided to go with kawi torque spec. First one felt wrong as I hit the value it snapped the thread off inside the head. Luckily it didn't damage the head but I learned a lesson. Sometimes feel is the way. How many thousands of plugs have you broke when snug plus 1/4 or 1/3 turn? None myself that way, and have 240psi compression sealed up.

By the way, were you walking the bolts tight?
 
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Oil on the threads requires a reduction in torque. 20% or something.. I was rebuilding my zx9r and replaced the plugs.. at about $10 a pop I decided to go with kawi torque spec. First one felt wrong as I hit the value it snapped the thread off inside the head. Luckily it didn't damage the head but I learned a lesson. Sometimes feel is the way. How many thousands of plugs have you broke when snug plus 1/4 or 1/3 turn? None myself that way, and have 240psi compression sealed up.

By the way, were you walking the bolts tight?
I was not. It was only like 5.8 in lb so I just said **** it and assumed it didn’t need it but I guess I should’ve cause the bolt size. It was my first time so I guess lesson learned. Do u think I should look up the actual number and reduce the torque spec by that percent or just hand snug em?
 

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Just snug each in a criss cross a little at a time to walk the pressure plate down. Then apply a similar 1/4 turn or so past when the bolt stops rotating freely in said cross pattern.
 
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Just snug each in a criss cross a little at a time to walk the pressure plate down. Then apply a similar 1/4 turn or so past when the bolt stops rotating freely in said cross pattern.
Gonna screen shot this and do it hopefully tomorrow if I can find the bolts in stock somewhere. Thanks so much.
 

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A SMALL bit of red thread adhesive for larger (and critical) bolts is a bit of guarantee. You can be liberal with the blue stuff and not have to worry about making it difficossible to take loose again. If there's any lube in the threads, not sure that blue will do anything; and would have to use a little more red.
 

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realistically, a bolt should not snap if it is properly torqued, even if it has some form of lubricant on the threads (loctite will do the same thing as oil, how many bolts have been snapped with loctite??? not many)

A bolt that lists a dry torque should be able to withstand a wet torque to the same setting on the torque wrench. Basically a bolt is rated to take, for example, 125% of the dry torque. When it is torqued wet, it would be at 120% of the dry torque and still not snap. That doesn't mean it's a good idea to lube every thread, but it won't kill you.

That being said, the bolt snapping when torqued to the listed spec means the bolt was fatigued and needed to be replaced anyways. That means you should definitely replace them all. And do not use hardware store bolts, buy the OEM ones.
 
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