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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I just picked up a 05 R6 and I am newbie to a 600. Had a Ninja 250 for a few months.. and this bike feels completely different. Just a quick question about cornering..

When you are coming to a corner and you counter-steer to get the bike leaned over. Do you turn the front wheel back to face the corner after the initial lean? Or do you keep it counter-steered throughout the turn?
 

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don't think about it so much. just ride - under control - and you'll slowly get the hang of it. i know i can make turns, but i don't pay attention to what my hands are doing. they just DO.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the fast response..I'm trying to get an understanding of what you "should be" doing. I know most of it just happens naturally without having to think about it but still would be nice to have some info.
 

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Look where you want to go and not where you are going and be smooth and steady on the throttle and your hands should naturally do what they are suppose to with time.
 

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Meh
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Don't think about it so much in terms of trying to change the direction of the front wheel.

How hard you press will determine how quickly the bike leans over. Press/push to get the lean and trajectory you want, then ease up on the pressure.

The front tire will naturally flop back over into the turn once you set your lean angle. If you physically try to turn it back, you're essentially counter steering the other way, and it's going to stand the bike back up.

The ergonomics of the two bikes may feel way different, but they will counter-steer in exactly the same way. Just do what you did on your Ninja and it'll behave as expected.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The front tire will naturally flop back over into the turn once you set your lean angle.
This is what I experienced..which is why I'm asking this question. When I was turning, I pressed left and leaned left. When I started to lean I felt the front kind of turn back towards corner (bar turning left), so I'm trying to clarify am I suppose to keep the bar pressed left? Or do I let it steer back and hold/adjust from there?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So basically after the initial counter-steer lean. Do I keep the front counter-steered or does it go back inline with my corner line?
 

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Meh
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Apply pressure to set the lean, once the bike is leaned as far as you want/need it, you can release the pressure. You shouldn't be trying to hold the wheel pointed in a specific direction. You want to let the wheel flop back.

You want to make a fast, smooth steering input to set the angle, and then be loose on the bars to let the front end do it's thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Apply pressure to set the lean, once the bike is leaned as far as you want/need it, you can release the pressure. You shouldn't be trying to hold the wheel pointed in a specific direction. You want to let the wheel flop back.

You want to make a fast, smooth steering input to set the angle, and then be loose on the bars to let the front end do it's thing.
That answers my questions, Thanks !
 

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I would strongly recommend the Lee Park's ARC (Advanced Riding Clinic):
http://www.tonystrackdays.com/category/4039/total-control-arc.htm

It will take the MSF stuff to another level.

Not sure where you are located, but we like the program so much that we run in at the same time we run our trackdays.

So riders can take the ARC on day one, do a track walk right after the class, then wake up and ride the track the next day!

Basically, you learn all the right moves in the parking lot next to the track... then get to practice them on the track right the next day.

Regardless of where you get it... definitely take some more training so all of this is second nature.
 

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my r6 made batman jealous
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Chances are since your asking about cornering you need some serious practice.

Obviously its a very important part of riding, don't go fast and just get used to the feeling.
It should all come natural once you get used to the difference in your bike...

Practice and be safe.. don't go crazy if you can't handle it
 

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Look where you want to go and not where you are going and be smooth and steady on the throttle and your hands should naturally do what they are suppose to with time.
definitely dont overthink it !

and like said above look where you want to go and ur mint

it feels weird at times (i been riding for 3 years)

but you will go wherever you are looking
 

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If your asking these questions, I think you should stay on the 250 for at least 1 more season.
 

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Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch and Total Control by Lee Parks.

Good books to read and help you with your riding I read these books everyday. You never stop learning to be a better rider on the street or the track. Good luck out there son! And keep the rubber side down :YEA
 

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sport riding tech is a great book. making my wife read it as takes the safety bike class next month. Now ill have to check out the book from parks as well, thaks for the heads zup.
 

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How I taught myself was in an empty parking lot.. in a straight line I just rode at about 30mph and just flicked the bars left and right. And then when I started getting comfortable I'd swing it left then back right and hold it right and do a circle. It'll give you lean. So basically yeah... countersteer and then come back.. If you want to make a right turn.. flick left then comeback right.. Don't quote me on that though that was a long long time ago and when I'm actually riding I don't know if I'm actually doing that because I stopped paying attention.
 

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Its hard for someone to grasp the idea of the countersteer at speed. Push right, lean right, go right.

If you are riding in a perfect circle at speed, you will not straighten the bars out.. or ease the pressure on the bars.. or let the wheel "flop" back over. You will keep the pressure up enough to maintain a line, and gradually ease the pressure as you exit the curve.

That said, the pressure you have applied to the bar in your "push" is hardly the same as a low speed maneuver where you point the front tire in the direction you want to go and counterbalance your weight to keep the bike upright.

Being able to separate these two conditions is what separates good riders from people who cant take corners at speed because their minds cant switch.

Best advice has already been given - LOOK where you want to go. NOT where you might end up ... If you look ahead into a curve and find an exit point, your body will do its thing. If you lose focus and your mind wanders off to the grass on the side of the road, your asshole puckers up, you freeze, and your brain takes you into the grass.
 

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This is what I experienced..which is why I'm asking this question. When I was turning, I pressed left and leaned left. When I started to lean I felt the front kind of turn back towards corner (bar turning left), so I'm trying to clarify am I suppose to keep the bar pressed left? Or do I let it steer back and hold/adjust from there?
Sounds like you need to keep a constant grip on the amount of gas you're giving it, if you chop the throttle in mid turn you will upset the suspension and get yourself ina world of trouble in a hurry. Like others have said, look at where you are going, hopefully through the turn, and keep everything else constant, like throttle and body position...
 
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