Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello there, I have just joined the forum after ready some very interesting articles :)

I have a question about cornering!

On the roads (not track) what is the best way to take corners, by that i mean should you be leaning off the bike in the corners like you see riders on the track, or should you stay seated and just counter steer?

I know about slow in, fast out, and lookin around the corner. Just not sure how to progress my cornering??

Thanks

Andy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
you realize every turn above 15mph your counter steering right?

i quit riding street and ride track only now but you definately dont want to be leaning off like at the track. presonally when i rode street i would never take a turn up right.=, but i wouldnt be haning off like a monkey if you want to progress your cornering do it in a safe controlled environment not on the street.
 

·
Custom User Title
Joined
·
696 Posts
Are you suggesting that those that don't have any desire to go to a race track have no reasonable means of advancing their skills?

"Counter steering" is a misleading term. I have seen riders that read or heard about counter steering, and it was never made clear to them that it is only for initiating lean. A motorcycle is not steered at the bars in the sense that a car is. Controlling a motorcycle is a total body action.

Your upper body placement will have more of an affect on center of gravity than your lower body will. Particularly your head placement is important. You will see many riders slide their butt way off of the seat and ride crossed up with their upper body on top of the tank which is counter productive. Often times this is a result of the rider wanting to drag a knee for the novelty of it and developing poor form as a result. Not much hip movement is needed when the upper body is placed correctly. For your situation all that is needed is leaning into the corner to some degree that will allow you to corner comfortably and in control. So much of motorcycling is about feel that there is no concrete answer to many technique related questions. Trial and error is how most of us learn.
 

·
Dragging Knee
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
In corners you need to get off your seat some you don't have to hang off like you do at the track but as the pace picks up more you must get off the bike more. You don't want to be sitting perpendicular to the ground while cornering because you are having to lean the bike more than necessary. Cornering is a combination of body positioning and countersteering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
You could move your weight over a bit, but I would keep the knee tucked into the bike because 1) it may be a red flag to any LEO to watch ya if you are breaking the law, and 2) I would discourage you to search for the pavement with your knee cap on the streets because the roads aren't as clean as a track (generally) and asphalt eats through jeans a little quicker than pucks - seriously.

Yeah, I'd be a hypocrit if I said that one should never ever have some fun on some open, barren twisties, but to really get a good lesson on cornering, try some track days. It's safer, and provides less opportunities for the general public to "bash" our 2-wheeled obsessions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hanging off the seat is debatable. Some folks are more exaggerated than others. Some track time will help you figure out your riding positions without pushing too hard on the street.

With any corner you generally want to shoot for the apex and accelerate out. There's much more to it than this, but there are tooooo many variables on the street (i.e. cagers, blind corners, road debris) to get into really specific details.

1) As you approach the curve, identify your entry, apex and exit. In very basic terms, your entry will be on the outside of your lane, the apex will be on the inside of your lane, and the exit will be on the outside of your lane.

2) Approach the curve at the correct speed (be on the slow side if you don't know the road). If you hit it too fast you'll have to make serious braking corrections mid turn. This is bad. Braking subtracts from your available traction while in the turn. This can be extremely bad if you're on a somewhat blind corner with a decreasing radius. Note - this needs to be done at the same time as number 1 above.

3.) Enter curve with the brief glance at the apex and then move your attention to the exit. This happens pretty fast. If you stare at the apex in front of you for too long, you may not hit your exit correctly (i.e wide) and may have to correct with braking.

4.) Accelerate to your exit.

5.) Repeat.

Braking through turns is generally bad unless you're proficient at trail braking. Braking usually means you made a mistake.

I know this is pretty basic, but I hope it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Another quick tip....if you hit the entry too hot (this will almost inevitably happen), try to ride it out. Braking will likely cause you to go wide (i.e. into other lane or off the road). You're brain will tell you to brake. Don't listen to it unless you REALLY hot! Also, don't chop the throttle especially if you start to rear slide. Chopping throttle during a rear slide will likely result in a high side. Ride it out. Your bike is made to take turns at much faster speeds than most of us can handle. Your brain will bail out before the bike likely will. Increase lean angle and let your a$$ pucker. It works.
 

·
Atom Smasher
Joined
·
862 Posts
DealsGapR6 said:
"Counter steering" is a misleading term. I have seen riders that read or heard about counter steering, and it was never made clear to them that it is only for initiating lean. A motorcycle is not steered at the bars in the sense that a car is. Controlling a motorcycle is a total body action.QUOTE]

Tightening a line mid corner, decreasing radius? Take a corner a little too hot add presseure to the inside bar. I counter steer alot, not just for initiating a turn.
 

·
Can't Get Enough
Joined
·
130 Posts
BravoFoxtrot said:
Another quick tip....if you hit the entry too hot (this will almost inevitably happen), try to ride it out. Braking will likely cause you to go wide (i.e. into other lane or off the road). You're brain will tell you to brake. Don't listen to it unless you REALLY hot! Also, don't chop the throttle especially if you start to rear slide. Chopping throttle during a rear slide will likely result in a high side. Ride it out. Your bike is made to take turns at much faster speeds than most of us can handle. Your brain will bail out before the bike likely will. Increase lean angle and let your a$$ pucker. It works.

Another thing people tend to forget and I never see posted anywhere, Turning slows you down, so even if you go in hot, and you still turn the bike hard, you will still shed speed.

Not chopping the throttle is probally the best advice, (I'm guility of this one, damn survival responses!)

You might want to look at reading, twist of a wrist. .. . good info in there and will help you to spot bad advice, as there is some in this thread! (there is lots all over this forum).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
b.burton said:
DealsGapR6 said:
"Counter steering" is a misleading term. I have seen riders that read or heard about counter steering, and it was never made clear to them that it is only for initiating lean. A motorcycle is not steered at the bars in the sense that a car is. Controlling a motorcycle is a total body action.QUOTE]

Tightening a line mid corner, decreasing radius? Take a corner a little too hot add presseure to the inside bar. I counter steer alot, not just for initiating a turn.
B burton, Im sure dealsgap R6 is giving out correct info,
I wouldn't go quoting his posts like you know how to ride better. maybe you can I don't know, but Ive seen a few videos from him, anyone that can ride like this knows what he is talking about.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Y-1EN-LMHb4
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
I've got a question.

I havn't hit any track time yet so most of my leaning has been on some curvy roads near here. For the most part I have been staying completly on my seat but in some corners my foot will start to drag on the pavement. A friend told me (an experienced rider) that I need to lean off the bike so the bike can stay more upright so that will not happen. Is there any truth behind this? It freaks me out when I'm midway through a corner and my foot catches the asphalt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks - everyone for the answers :)

If you foot is catching the ground - move your foot so the balls of your foot are on the pegs, not midfoot or heal.

Thats correct as far as i understand it, leaning off reduces the amount you have to lean it as your weight aid the steering, but then you go faster and faster and the bike will be off the tyre edges anyway. (This is my understanding - not that i do it yet!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
interesting read fellas

im doing my first track day next month so all info is handy
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top