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adjust for the settings Mac said, but you might still need to make adjustments as you ride since weight distribution changes under certain acceleration and braking loads. they are just guidelines, not the optimal setting for everyone
 

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Meh
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sorry to ask this..

what is your opinion. is my weight not comfortable to this oem setting?
There's not really any way for us to know - you need to grab two buddies to help, and measure the sag, then adjust the pre-load from there.

The chances that your body weight and distribution perfectly matches the stock suspension settings is very, very slim though.
 

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Meh
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do you mean that the spring or OEM shock/fork does not suit to me?

I tried to changed the rear preload but cannot reach to 30-35mm street.


kindly give opinion.
Yup, that means you'd benefit from a different spring. What did you manage to get to on rider sag? You generally want a little more sag in the front (5-10mm) compared to the rear, so you might not be far off.

And the numbers are just a general starting point - how it feels to you is what really counts.
 

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What measurements are you coming up with, and what did you adjust?

The bike comes with .92 kg/mm front springs and a 10.0kg/mm rear. A 65 kg rider would need around a .932 kg/mm (tiny difference) and 11.63kg/mm rear (still realistically not a huge difference).

You should be able to hit or come reasonably close to desired sag settings.
 

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Get Some..!
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Op, not sure how you are measuring to get those figures. Static or rider sag?
Racetech calculator recommends stock spring rates for your weight.
http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/2/Yamaha/YZF-R6/2008-12
Static sag ~20mm front ~10mm rear (bike weight without rider from topped out measurement)
Rider sag ~35mm front ~30mm rear (bike and rider weight combined from topped out measurement)

Dan, where are you getting those figures from as I am 220 pounds and currently on a 10.7kg rear. I'm looking to go to a 11.2kg to achieve 8-10mm static sag at 25mm rider sag. 11.63kg for 65kg seems really stiff?
 

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Op, not sure how you are measuring to get those figures. Static or rider sag?
Racetech calculator recommends stock spring rates for your weight.
http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/2/Yamaha/YZF-R6/2008-12
Static sag ~20mm front ~10mm rear (bike weight without rider from topped out measurement)
Rider sag ~35mm front ~30mm rear (bike and rider weight combined from topped out measurement)

Dan, where are you getting those figures from as I am 220 pounds and currently on a 10.7kg rear. I'm looking to go to a 11.2kg to achieve 8-10mm static sag at 25mm rider sag. 11.63kg for 65kg seems really stiff?
I used the calculator on Race Tech's website.
 

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Op, not sure how you are measuring to get those figures. Static or rider sag?
Racetech calculator recommends stock spring rates for your weight.
http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/2/Yamaha/YZF-R6/2008-12
Static sag ~20mm front ~10mm rear (bike weight without rider from topped out measurement)
Rider sag ~35mm front ~30mm rear (bike and rider weight combined from topped out measurement)

Dan, where are you getting those figures from as I am 220 pounds and currently on a 10.7kg rear. I'm looking to go to a 11.2kg to achieve 8-10mm static sag at 25mm rider sag. 11.63kg for 65kg seems really stiff?
I used the calculator on Race Tech's website.
And input the wrong machine :comp

Came up with stock of .90 kg/mm and 9.8 kg/mm, with a 65kg rider needing .858 kg/mm front and 9.886 kg/mm rear. So his springs should be dead on unless I input it incorrectly again. I do apologize for the confusion.
 

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Meh
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9,231 Posts
this is my sag

front - 19mm

rear - 5mm
What measurements are you coming up with, and what did you adjust?

The bike comes with .92 kg/mm front springs and a 10.0kg/mm rear. A 65 kg rider would need around a .932 kg/mm (tiny difference) and 11.63kg/mm rear (still realistically not a huge difference).

You should be able to hit or come reasonably close to desired sag settings.
In light of Mick & Dan taking the time to look up the spring rates... your measurements seem way off. It sounds like you may be measuring static sag, not rider sag.

How exactly are you measuring sag? When we refer to sag, we mean rider sag, which is a measure of how much suspension travel is taken up with the rider sitting on the bike. To measure this correctly, follow these steps:

- Take all weight off the wheel you're measuring for. You can do this by tipping the bike onto the kickstand and rocking it back towards the opposite wheel. If you're not comfortable doing that, or don't have a kickstand, you can use a triple tree stand for the front, and jack stands under the pegs (if they're not folding-type) for the rear. Or hang the bike from the rafters with ratchet straps, whatever it takes to get the weight off the wheel so the suspension 'hangs' at it's full length.

- For the front, you can measure the amount of exposed chrome fork tube. On the rear, measure between the rear axle, and a fixed point on the tail section. I keep a little piece of tape on my tail so I have a consistent reference point to measure from. Write your measurements down.

- Now, sit on the bike as if you were riding it, feet on the bikes, hands on the clip-ons, and have a buddy or two balance the bike straight up and down (or put it in a wheel chock if you have one).

- Measure at the same places as before, write the number down.

- Subtract the 2nd measurement (you on the bike) from the first measurement (suspension stretched all the way out), and that is your rider sag.

It's also useful to know the static sag, which is done the same way, but for the 2nd measurement you'll just do it without you on the bike.

:cheers
 

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Get Some..!
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sorry. my rider sag front is 20mm and rear is 23mm. so on rear side, I decrease the spring preload from 4 to 1 and yet is only 27mm.
27mm is not a bad starting point considering the limited adjustment with oem ramp adjuster. Unlike other manufacturers, the R6 preload adjuster on front forks does not travel up or down when adjusted. It is the outer sleeve that surrounds the preload adjuster that travels up and down, applying more or less preload.
More lines showing/less sleeve visible = Less sag e.g. 20mm
Less lines showing/more sleeve visible = More sag e.g. 40mm
 

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Meh
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9,231 Posts
Iam bit confused now...
what you are saying, less sag will have harder preload or spring I have?
On the front forks, the pre-load adjust has lines on it. As you add pre-load, you will have more lines showing. When you take pre-load out (soften it), you will have less lines showing. In the picture below, the gold part has the lines we're talking about. The one on the left would be all pre-load removed (gives you the larger sag number) the one on the right is maximum pre-load (gives you the smallest sag number possible).


Adding pre-load (turning clockwise, makes more lines show) will result in LESS rider sag.

Removing pre-load (turning counter-clockwise, makes the adjuster go into the fork so less lines are showing) will result in MORE rider sag.
 
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