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When doing a chain adjustment, do you set the slack at the low end, high end or the middle of the specified range and why? Just trying to get an idea of whether or not each has it's own advantages and disadvantages in regards to performance and longevity of the chain, sprockets and other associated hardware. I'm already aware of the fact that a chain that is tightened beyond spec loads the engine more and places more stress on the countershaft and seal and one that is too loose can potentially come off the sprocket as well as have an adverse affect on acceleration. So, I'm mainly concerned about the measurements that fall within Yamaha's recommendation.

Also, it is widely accepted here that the chain should be warm before applying lube to help draw the product into the chain. How long of a ride do you think is sufficient to get the chain up to the ideal temp, assuming a typical around town riding style...for example, moderate speeds (35-55mph)with a few stops and starts and little to no trips on the freeway?
 

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As far as adjustments go, I try to set mine within the middle range, but with the chain you will find it varies depending on when and where you measure the chain.

Turn your rear wheel until you get to the tightest portion and adjust the slack to the tightest of the recommended specs here. You will find that in contrast when you rotate to the wheel to the portion of the chain that is the most loose that this should be near the higher end of the recommended specs.

As far as warming up the chain goes, I don't worry about it. The way I look at it is that the lube I apply should safely surround the chain and rings, and the next time I drive it will be absorbed.
 

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You want your chain in oem specs in the tightest part of the chain. This is why you should check your chain slack in 2-3 places in the chain. Also, we have found it's best to be on the loose side of the oem specs. Rarely do you see any problems with a chain too loose compared to too tight. If a chain is too loose it will slap the sprocket when you get on the gas and spread the teeth. If it's too tight you risk everything you said above plus loosing the teeth on the rear sprocket or breaking the chain. You don't want it super lose to where you give it gas and it takes a blip for the bike to start moving as it's taking up slack. I always set mine to the looser side of oem specs and I get great miles out of my chain kits.

Rarely do we see chains too loose, but it can happen and the damage is much less then being too tight. So if you have to error one way or another it's better to be have it a tad on the loose side.
 

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not directed at the op of this thread.....but why people don't bother to look at an owners manual is appauling to me.
if they would they would see the proper specs and way to adjust the chains.

the specs are 1.4-1.8 in.
it doesn't really matter where, it just matters that it's there.
 

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Jesus Reigns
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You want your chain in oem specs in the tightest part of the chain. This is why you should check your chain slack in 2-3 places in the chain. Also, we have found it's best to be on the loose side of the oem specs. Rarely do you see any problems with a chain too loose compared to too tight. If a chain is too loose it will slap the sprocket when you get on the gas and spread the teeth. If it's too tight you risk everything you said above plus loosing the teeth on the rear sprocket or breaking the chain. You don't want it super lose to where you give it gas and it takes a blip for the bike to start moving as it's taking up slack. I always set mine to the looser side of oem specs and I get great miles out of my chain kits.

Rarely do we see chains too loose, but it can happen and the damage is much less then being too tight. So if you have to error one way or another it's better to be have it a tad on the loose side.
I needed to hear this. Ive often wondered which is worse, too loose or too tight. Figured its better to have it a little loose.
 

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Loose is better, if your chain is too tight it can bind and cause the suspension to not do it's job...that could send you in a ditch if you're mid corner and hit a bump...not good for the engine if it binds either.
 
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