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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see most people on this forum looking at race plastics for their track bikes as well as bikes on the track. Why not a crash cage? These would protect the plastics and is cheaper than race plastics.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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Because the cage is heavy as fuck and restricts the lean angle somewhat. If someone wants some more protection for the track than regular frame sliders offer, race rails are the way to go.
 

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V-twins Rock
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I've wondered the same thing. The only thing that I can come up with, is if you have a spill and some part of you gets pinned in between the rail and the bike. That would cause a horrible injury.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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I've wondered the same thing. The only thing that I can come up with, is if you have a spill and some part of you gets pinned in between the rail and the bike. That would cause a horrible injury.
It would be pretty hard for something to get pinned between a quality set of race rails and the bike. I mean, your fingers could get caught in there, but that is about it. I wouldnt even be too worried about it, since there are already so many other places fingers could get snagged.



 

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nom nom nom nom nom nom
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... because race rails aren't for racing. And race rails don't do shit if you highside. They are basically glorified frame sliders.
 

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You're still likely to damage your stock plastics with a cage and it prohibits your lean angle. I'll scrape my plastics on some corners, can't imagine what would happen if the cage acted as a pivot point...
 

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wat?
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Many people do not even run frame sliders because it increases the chance that the bike will catch and flip. Flipping is more expensive than fairing rash.
 

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Meh
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Yeah ... that's not going to stop the body work from hitting the ground much more than frame sliders.

Track fairings are much easier and cheaper to repair or replace than the stock bodywork. Plus the belly pans are designed to catch fluid if you have a mechanical. And they're required to go racing.

The crash cage is a slightly better frame slider, and isn't a replacement for track bodywork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all for the replies. Some good pt's here. I thought the same thing about the frame sliders catching and causing more damage. I don't see my self getting down low enough to scrape the plastics. But hey, you never know..... I could see where leaning over far enough would scrape the crash cage though. I think that would be a problem. Looks like I'm going with race plastics. I was going to add a frame slider but sounds like it's better not to.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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Thanks all for the replies. Some good pt's here. I thought the same thing about the frame sliders catching and causing more damage. I don't see my self getting down low enough to scrape the plastics. But hey, you never know..... I could see where leaning over far enough would scrape the crash cage though. I think that would be a problem. Looks like I'm going with race plastics. I was going to add a frame slider but sounds like it's better not to.
For the track, a crash cage will only work for a beginner at best. You can still drag knee with a cage on there(I have personally done so myself), but anything past the newest of beginners is probably getting to be too much to use a cage with, though.

For the street, a cage should never get in the way. If you are leaning so hard on the street that you are scraping the cage, you are riding way too hard for the streets.

Long story short, if you are going track, get track plastics(and some sliders if you want). If you are going street, get whatever the hell you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
For the track, a crash cage will only work for a beginner at best. You can still drag knee with a cage on there(I have personally done so myself), but anything past the newest of beginners is probably getting to be too much to use a cage with, though.

For the street, a cage should never get in the way. If you are leaning so hard on the street that you are scraping the cage, you are riding way too hard for the streets.

Long story short, if you are going track, get track plastics(and some sliders if you want). If you are going street, get whatever the hell you want.

Race plastics it is then. I run either intermediate or advance depending on the track and who is running the track day.
 

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Am I the only one that thinks attaching a steel bar to a cast aluminum frame and then expecting it not to damage the frame in a heavy crash is a bad idea.
 

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Meh
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Am I the only one that thinks attaching a steel bar to a cast aluminum frame and then expecting it not to damage the frame in a heavy crash is a bad idea.
If only BigSheep was here. I'm sure he could engineer the shit out of an answer for you.

I don't think it's significantly worse than a frame slider on a steel bolt though. The leverage is going to be about the same, and you're spreading the load out across multiple attachment points.

The devil is in the details though. If that steel bar catches on some immovable object while the bike is sailing on it's side at a high rate of speed ... I could see it going poorly.
 

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Yamaha 4 Life
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The cage can easily serve as a leverage point when the bike goes down and could cause it to flip. A sliding bike will rarely result in serious structural damage but once a bike gets airborne, all bets are off.
 
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