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ive had more then a few times of that, walt (3rd-geer) was right behind me and thought i was going to be launched from the bike. its really only when i get tired or lazy with body position. i had money to blow so i picked up a nice ohlins damper but i dont expect it to perform miracles, if anything the head shake is always an indication to me that im doing something wrong and id rather it not be drowned out by a damper.
 

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i had money to blow so i picked up a nice ohlins damper but i dont expect it to perform miracles, if anything the head shake is always an indication to me that im doing something wrong and id rather it not be drowned out by a damper.
Ohlins will perform miracles.

Head shake is not an indication of you doing something wrong (not always)... it's also an indication of physics. You can't beat it alone, but Ohlins will help you. Isaac Newton would get a hard on if he saw what dampers could do.
 

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I dont ride track much anymore (kids take most of that kind of play money ). I had a pretty severe head shake while changing lanes on the freeway and hit a what i think was a pothole. Was able to ride through it. Bought a Scott's damper the next day. It changed the entire feel if the bike on the street. Its set really loose but bad road bumps mid turn dont phase the bike one bit. Ill have one on any future bike i have. I think ill set my suspension up without one on it though. It does mask some suspension feel.
 

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Ohlins will perform miracles.

Head shake is not an indication of you doing something wrong (not always)... it's also an indication of physics. You can't beat it alone, but Ohlins will help you. Isaac Newton would get a hard on if he saw what dampers could do.
ive only rode with it once and it wasnt but a few laps before i low sided. i did notice that mid corner it helped clear up some vibrations i was noticing before and when i pull the front wheel it came down much smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
yes i'll get a pic of the mount up next week once i get done with my pre-race maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I hope your next race was two years in the future Shawn.



That's the mount location and angle, and it's just using a few of the included brackets to get it oriented and angled properly.
 

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as long as you understand why it happened, you can make adjustments so that it doesn't happen again. there's a lot of ripples coming out of 10b onto the front straight if you push out to the edge of the track early. combined with the act of adjusting yourself on the bike as you're rolling on the throttle is likely what caused this.

i had a vicious head shake this season at gingerman coming out of turn 6 that sent me off-track at about 90mph. totally my fault; lazy, tired, last session, too much input on the bars.

because of that, i will be getting a damper, too. mostly because i know me and i know that i will one day be lazy and tired at the end of the day again.

good save, btw...



i'm getting the pit bull. seems like all the STG guys are using them and like them and that's good enough for me...


s3aturnr
THIS** It's so important to understand WHY it happened in the first place so that you can avoid it happening again. The description of why it probably occurred is a great one as well. Anytime there are bumps or ripples on the pavement combined with added rider input (moving around on the bike, gripping the bars tightly etc) and the bike can develop good head shake. Steering dampers can help for sure but there are things the rider can do to prevent headshake/tankslappers and things they can do do deal with one if you happen to experience one.

That being said: What can you do to avoid tank slappers and what should you do if you have one? (with or without a damper...)
 

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I rode on the track for a while and never had a damper. I had some head shakes and the skipping of the front tire off the ground was always sketchy but it didn't bother me. Until I had one almost throw me off, then I purchased one.

Has anyone ever cut open a $600 Ohlins and a $100 damper from China? Just curious.
 

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...
That being said: What can you do to avoid tank slappers and what should you do if you have one? (with or without a damper...)
you really cant. Make take an alternate line or less weight on your hands.
Alot of times you can plateau getting faster but increase your bike control skills.
That style is very physical especially with a very heavy sprung bike! A friend went from 9.90 spring rate to 9.0s and picked up 1.8 seconds at Barber to get his PB under a 31 in a race. Not just 1 lap... like 6!
Knowing all that he can continue to drop time to get a sub :30 lap time.
 

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you really cant. Make take an alternate line or less weight on your hands.
Alot of times you can plateau getting faster but increase your bike control skills.
That style is very physical especially with a very heavy sprung bike! A friend went from 9.90 spring rate to 9.0s and picked up 1.8 seconds at Barber to get his PB under a 31 in a race. Not just 1 lap... like 6!
Knowing all that he can continue to drop time to get a sub :30 lap time.

Actually you can. There are several things you can do. Here is an article I wrote on the subject. What's a Tankslapper? | MotoMom

But to start with, being loose on the bars is the most important thing. This can be achieved by having good body position and a stable lower body. If you experience a tank slapper then you want to avoid chopping the throttle and/or gripping the bars tighter, both instinctual and natural survival reactions.....
 

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Actually you can. There are several things you can do. Here is an article I wrote on the subject. What's a Tankslapper? | MotoMom
But to start with, being loose on the bars is the most important thing. This can be achieved by having good body position and a stable lower body. If you experience a tank slapper then you want to avoid chopping the throttle and/or gripping the bars tighter, both instinctual and natural survival reactions.....
couple things...
I did not see any technique to "avoid" tankslappers which is a natural part of riding fast.
Same as folding over the front tire, loosing the front, etc. Or maybe you can give the racers
that run the TT some pointers...lol
A damper "slows" the slappers down so they dont develop a "frequency" but as far as I know there is no way to avoid them.

good body position?? Not even sure what that is supposed to mean? There are many different types of "good" position
because many road racers train on different platforms and have different styles. (dirt, flat track, etc)
 

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I rode on the track for a while and never had a damper. I had some head shakes and the skipping of the front tire off the ground was always sketchy but it didn't bother me. Until I had one almost throw me off, then I purchased one.

Has anyone ever cut open a $600 Ohlins and a $100 damper from China? Just curious.
Now THIS is the right question to ask. Durability on the clones is definitely worse but even if the China one lasts only 2 seasons, it'll be 12 years before the ohlins is more cost-effective. The next question is quality which is truly a good question. Perhaps someone with experience can chime in?
 

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Now THIS is the right question to ask. Durability on the clones is definitely worse but even if the China one lasts only 2 seasons, it'll be 12 years before the ohlins is more cost-effective. The next question is quality which is truly a good question. Perhaps someone with experience can chime in?
there have been "universal" linear damper kits available for years.
fabricate or purchase a clamp for the fork leg and mount the clevis end onto a stanchion or frame.
 

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couple things...
I did not see any technique to "avoid" tankslappers which is a natural part of riding fast.
Same as folding over the front tire, loosing the front, etc. Or maybe you can give the racers
that run the TT some pointers...lol
A damper "slows" the slappers down so they dont develop a "frequency" but as far as I know there is no way to avoid them.

good body position?? Not even sure what that is supposed to mean? There are many different types of "good" position
because many road racers train on different platforms and have different styles. (dirt, flat track, etc)
Actually there is a very clear statement in the article that explains how to avoid having a tank slapper in the first place and that is to not death grip the bars or tighten up when the suspension is auto-correcting itself. Riders are the ones that create the instability on the motorcycle and it is not to be accepted as just a natural part of riding fast, but of making a mistake while riding. (provided that everything is mechanically sound on the bike) Avoiding tank slappers is done by riding with a relaxed grip on the bars and a stable lower body.

There are also techniques that you can use to avoid tucking the front tire or crashing, these are not things that just happen for no reason, or because you rode fast.... they happen because mistakes were made.

Good body position is one that keeps your lower body stable and allows your arms to be relaxed on the bars- sure there are different "types" of riding position and necessary differences in body position for different styles (dirt, flat track, roadracing etc) but there is a clear difference between POOR body position or poor riding skills that can increase the chance of riding mistakes like tank slappers, tucking the front, crashes etc.
 

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Actually there is a very clear statement in the article that explains how to avoid having a tank slapper in the first place and that is to not death grip the bars or tighten up when the suspension is auto-correcting itself. Riders are the ones that create the instability on the motorcycle and it is not to be accepted as just a natural part of riding fast, but of making a mistake while riding. (provided that everything is mechanically sound on the bike) Avoiding tank slappers is done by riding with a relaxed grip on the bars and a stable lower body.

There are also techniques that you can use to avoid tucking the front tire or crashing, these are not things that just happen for no reason, or because you rode fast.... they happen because mistakes were made...
just so Im clear... youre stating that tank slappers are 100% the riders fault, correct?

also please tell me again the highest level of "riding" experience you have outside the Code school?
Did you win any regional, national, or world events?

Nobody said a word about crashing, which according to you is "novice" stuff...eh?
 
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