Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Loves his R6
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So i had a close call yesterday. Was out with some friends who were all on liter bikes. Came to an empty stretch and everyone started hauling so i started chasing them to see if i could keep up.

I think i was in second gear going flat out when all of a sudden the steering wheel went into a crazy wobble, yanked left & right really hard. It was all over in a few seconds but really scary, i thought i was a goner for sure.

I don't know what happened, maybe i hit a pothole? Or maybe the front wheel came up for a second and i didn't put it down straight. What's the best way to handle the bike in this situation?

Fortunately i had gripped the handlebars tight and didn't get thrown off, i let go of the throttle right away obviously.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
welcome to the world of tank slappers. uh, normally, tap the rear brake and loosen your grip on the handlebars, or apply throttle if you can, whatever you can to unload weight off the front end, the bike will normally right itself, when you tighten your grip and put pressure on the front end, it doesnt allow the bike to work itself out as easily because you're input isn't fast enough to do what needs to be done to fix it. thats what i've always been taught and done and its worked so far
 

·
Yeah Science!
Joined
·
7,339 Posts
Are you on the balls off your feet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,940 Posts
give it more gas next time.
 

·
AFM #327
Joined
·
15,209 Posts
use handle bars not a steering wheel, thats why you had the wobble :laugh

never try to keep up with someone else, ride your own pace :fact

holding the bars too tight will certainly make it worse as well as letting the throttle go, infact, you need to do quite the opposite, hold it a bit loose and go wide open throttle to unload the front.
 

·
iRun
Joined
·
33,319 Posts
Steering damper, less weight on the bars, grip the bars more loosely.
 

·
I do what I want!
Joined
·
519 Posts
use handle bars not a steering wheel, thats why you had the wobble :laugh

never try to keep up with someone else, ride your own pace :fact

holding the bars too tight will certainly make it worse as well as letting the throttle go, infact, you need to do quite the opposite, hold it a bit loose and go wide open throttle to unload the front.
I'm a noob, but this was my first observation! :bowroll
 

·
Team STG Racing
Joined
·
337 Posts
As previously mentioned...keep a light grip on the bars (at all times) and give it some gas if you can.

Most importantly, LET IT WOBBLE. The bike WILL correct itself if you allow it to do so. If you try to hold it stiff and stop it from wobbling, all you will do is transfer that energy somewhere else...and it could end up bad.

There are many times/places (like coming over the hill at T5 at Road Atlanta) when i get headshake every lap, i expect it. I just keep a loose grip and keep the throttle pinned.
 

·
Team STG Racing
Joined
·
337 Posts
BTW - something to keep in mind whenever you experience headshake (and especially a bad tank slapper) is that your brake pads could have been pushed back (similar to how you push them back into the caliper when you reinstall them on the front wheel).

So before you get into the next braking zone, tap the brakes a little bit to make sure they are there. You might have to pump them a time or two.

Like when im coming into T6 at Road Atlanta, before i actually get to my braking zone, i will give the brake lever a small pull just to see if i can feel some resistance, before i actually get to where i am going to brake.

A tank-slapper induced brake "failure' coming into T6 at Road Atlanta is essentially when ended Tray Batey's career in the AMA race there a year or two ago. He got headshake coming out of T5, then got to T6 and when he first grabbed the brakes, they werent there. He couldnt get it slowed down enough and went down.
 

·
crashing aint so bad
Joined
·
2,271 Posts
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Ha soooooooooo true.

I got the shakes pretty bad coming out of a turn. I was so numb to it that I just shook it off and thought nothing of it. So the next turn is a wide sweeper that you go about 120 mph through and then accelerate out of to a blind right hand turn. As I went to slow down for the blind turn there was ZERO brakes. So I of course rampantly started squeezing the lever. Well it only took two pumps for pressure to build. I lifted the rear tire off the ground and just barely slowed down enough to make the turn. It took another couple of laps and another couple wobbles before I realized that it was the pads getting flung into the calipers.

Read what you can about what causes them, understand it and you will soon find that they are not as bad as it may seem. The issue is controllable and can be tamed even without spending money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,071 Posts
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Ha soooooooooo true.

I got the shakes pretty bad coming out of a turn. I was so numb to it that I just shook it off and thought nothing of it. So the next turn is a wide sweeper that you go about 120 mph through and then accelerate out of to a blind right hand turn. As I went to slow down for the blind turn there was ZERO brakes. So I of course rampantly started squeezing the lever. Well it only took two pumps for pressure to build. I lifted the rear tire off the ground and just barely slowed down enough to make the turn. It took another couple of laps and another couple wobbles before I realized that it was the pads getting flung into the calipers.

Read what you can about what causes them, understand it and you will soon find that they are not as bad as it may seem. The issue is controllable and can be tamed even without spending money.
how did the pads get pushed back? that shiit is scary! i'm installing new brake pads soon and now i'm like :scared
 

·
crashing aint so bad
Joined
·
2,271 Posts
The force of the tire going back and forth causes the rotor to warp. This in turn pushes the pistons into the calipers. The inertia of the tire going back and forth also helps fling them out. to test this simply give a few tugs on each rotor near the pads one day and then squeeze the lever.You should find that you will have to pump it a couple times to get good lever back.

You have to have a pretty violent shake for it to happen. It's also not as bad when you have the pad springs in. If you take the pad springs out, all bets are off. They seem to help keep the pads from flinging out. When removed the pads float freely in the calipers and in turn are easier to get moved by inertia and all. Most racers remove them because they can cause the pads to hang up on the rotors a little which can cause drag. In some cases however the springs can help give the brakes better response. This is because it hold the pads closer to the rotor which means less lever movement for braking to occur. It's the little things that make a difference.
 

·
Team STG Racing
Joined
·
337 Posts
The force of the tire going back and forth causes the rotor to warp. This in turn pushes the pistons into the calipers. The inertia of the tire going back and forth also helps fling them out. to test this simply give a few tugs on each rotor near the pads one day and then squeeze the lever.You should find that you will have to pump it a couple times to get good lever back.

You have to have a pretty violent shake for it to happen. It's also not as bad when you have the pad springs in. If you take the pad springs out, all bets are off. They seem to help keep the pads from flinging out. When removed the pads float freely in the calipers and in turn are easier to get moved by inertia and all. Most racers remove them because they can cause the pads to hang up on the rotors a little which can cause drag. In some cases however the springs can help give the brakes better response. This is because it hold the pads closer to the rotor which means less lever movement for braking to occur. It's the little things that make a difference.
Excellent post. :werd

I always have the springs removed in my race bikes for that reason.

To be honest, it really isnt something the "everyday rider" who just rides his stock bike back and forth to school or even down the mountains relatively "hard" has to worry about (talking about loss of brakes due to pads being pushed back).

I rode pretty hard (too hard actually) through the mountains before getting on a track (finally wised up) and even rode the track for a while before it ever happened to me.

It isnt common, but it IS something to be aware of if you get headshake. It doesnt take much, just a slight pull on the lever, to get the pads pushed back out. But if you are already riding on the limit and braking as deep as possible, you dont have that extra 1/2 second when it is time to brake. So i always give them a lil squeeze prior to getting into my braking zone.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top