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Wow, great questions. I’m guessing by the way you ask (much like a good teacher), there is something to learn here.

I can’t honestly say I know what my eyes are doing between markers other than scanning ahead. Aside from a couple long turns that allow you to push out 1/3 to 1/2 track (I like to look for tar lines and patch marks on those turns to make sure I’m on my line). Other than that it’s hust head up and eyes ahead.
What if you knew exactly where you wanted to be on track at all times? What if you had points to aim for, turn in, apex, exit on every corner of the track. Would that help you be more accurate and give you more confidence to go faster? Do you think the moto GP guys have that kind of accuracy?

What are some ways you could add more reference points so that you always had somewhere for your eyes to go?
 

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Discussion Starter #22
What if you knew exactly where you wanted to be on track at all times? What if you had points to aim for, turn in, apex, exit on every corner of the track. Would that help you be more accurate and give you more confidence to go faster? Do you think the moto GP guys have that kind of accuracy?

What are some ways you could add more reference points so that you always had somewhere for your eyes to go?
Aside from the helpful apex cones, and paint markers (that I can see) at Thunderhill, all I have are patches and tar lines on the track to guide me (they change frequently and require updates on a new track map). That, and faster riders.... I like when faster riders pass me on a line I haven’t seen. I always learn something, especially when the track photographer catches those moments. I hang with them as much as I’m comfortable (and just a hair beyond), so I can study their line. I let them go when I get close to my limit lol.

If you have any other tips I would love to hear! Unfortunately my R6 has been parked for a couple months due to family, work and budget. Thankfully I have been getting out every couple weeks to ride trails with friends (cheaper and closer than track days). All the same principals of vision and finesse seem to apply equally in the dirt. The biggest difference is there is no runnoff riding trails through the woods!
 

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I think I get low enough to "knee down" but I don't want to extend my knee out because I feel if something hits it my leg would Rip wide open at the hip or something so instead I tuck my knee in more towards the bike but I'm leaning my upper body way off at the top. I'm like, there is no need to "knee down" when there was a vid of someone smoking so many people at the track who were "knee downing".
 

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Aside from the helpful apex cones, and paint markers (that I can see) at Thunderhill, all I have are patches and tar lines on the track to guide me (they change frequently and require updates on a new track map). That, and faster riders.... I like when faster riders pass me on a line I haven’t seen. I always learn something, especially when the track photographer catches those moments. I hang with them as much as I’m comfortable (and just a hair beyond), so I can study their line. I let them go when I get close to my limit lol.

If you have any other tips I would love to hear! Unfortunately my R6 has been parked for a couple months due to family, work and budget. Thankfully I have been getting out every couple weeks to ride trails with friends (cheaper and closer than track days). All the same principals of vision and finesse seem to apply equally in the dirt. The biggest difference is there is no runnoff riding trails through the woods!
Well, first of all, how many reference points do you want/need for any given corner and what makes a good reference point? What does a reference point DO for you?

Also, have you ever DRAWN the track on your own? Like, not looking at the track map or anything but just drawing it from memory. How might that help you with solidifying your own reference points?

Sorry for taking so long to get back to you on this, I was in Spain riding for two weeks, including ARAGON!!! And then a few weeks later I spent 15 days riding in Nepal, insane! >:)

:grin::grin::grin:
 

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Years ago, when Loris Capirossi was riding for Wayne Rainey's team, Rainey suggested to Capirossi that he needed to adjust his line in a certain turn by something like 5 centimeters. Capirossi responded incredulously, "5 centimeters?! How can I do that?" To which Rainey replied, "That's why you're not as fast as you could be." (It's very possible I've mis-remembered portions of it, but that I think was the gist of the story.)
These GP riders are simply ASTONISHING, aren't they? To be so fast and so smooth, all while in the middle of a bunch of equally fast guys trying to pass on the inside, the outside, on the brakes, from the turns-- and also to be thinking about strategy, about the state of the tires, in addition to the extraordinary concentration required to be feel and respond to the bike through 45+ minutes. It is breathtaking sometimes to watch them.
 

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Years ago, when Loris Capirossi was riding for Wayne Rainey's team, Rainey suggested to Capirossi that he needed to adjust his line in a certain turn by something like 5 centimeters. Capirossi responded incredulously, "5 centimeters?! How can I do that?" To which Rainey replied, "That's why you're not as fast as you could be." (It's very possible I've mis-remembered portions of it, but that I think was the gist of the story.)
These GP riders are simply ASTONISHING, aren't they? To be so fast and so smooth, all while in the middle of a bunch of equally fast guys trying to pass on the inside, the outside, on the brakes, from the turns-- and also to be thinking about strategy, about the state of the tires, in addition to the extraordinary concentration required to be feel and respond to the bike through 45+ minutes. It is breathtaking sometimes to watch them.
They are astonishing! And you're right about them being so precise on track that a deviation of a few inches or cm's would be a lot. They seem to have the ability to put the front tire of their bike on the exact same spot for turn in, apex and exiting the corners.....but how? THat's kind of what I'm getting at with some of the questions here, HOW can they get so precise with their location on track? What are they doing differently that allows them the ability to hit the EXACT same spots lap after lap? :nerd:
 
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