Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I'll be doing my first track day soon and was wondering if anyone has any tips for a novice? Any techniques and info is greatly appreciated! Waiting on a race suit to come in and I'm headed to Jennings!


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,466 Posts
So I'll be doing my first track day soon and was wondering if anyone has any tips for a novice? Any techniques and info is greatly appreciated! Waiting on a race suit to come in and I'm headed to Jennings!


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
Go out there knowing 100%---you're not going to be the fastest one there. As silly as it sounds, folks get in over there head trying to keep up instead of getting comfortable. If you're not using warmers, kick back for 2 laps before you get on it. Take spare everything. Drink before you're thirsty, eat before you're hungry. Never stand when you can sit, never sit when you can lay down.

Take shade. Take cash. If anyone is offering suspension services--buy that before you buy anything. If Steph says "Just the tip, just to see how it feels, he's lying." Take pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Go out there knowing 100%---you're not going to be the fastest one there. As silly as it sounds, folks get in over there head trying to keep up instead of getting comfortable. If you're not using warmers, kick back for 2 laps before you get on it. Take spare everything. Drink before you're thirsty, eat before you're hungry. Never stand when you can sit, never sit when you can lay down.

Take shade. Take cash. If anyone is offering suspension services--buy that before you buy anything. If Steph says "Just the tip, just to see how it feels, he's lying." Take pics.
Haha...thanks man. I'll keep all that in mind!


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

·
Needs more stars
Joined
·
2,937 Posts
Go out there knowing 100%---you're not going to be the fastest one there. As silly as it sounds, folks get in over there head trying to keep up instead of getting comfortable. If you're not using warmers, kick back for 2 laps before you get on it. Take spare everything. Drink before you're thirsty, eat before you're hungry. Never stand when you can sit, never sit when you can lay down.

Take shade. Take cash. If anyone is offering suspension services--buy that before you buy anything. If Steph says "Just the tip, just to see how it feels, he's lying." Take pics.
I am always amazed at how many people do NOT warm up their tires for a lap or two.

My suggestions...if the organization you are running with has free instructors riding around, use them! :cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Go out there knowing 100%---you're not going to be the fastest one there. As silly as it sounds, folks get in over there head trying to keep up instead of getting comfortable.
Totally agree. You are not there to impress anybody. The other riders dont care about your speed or lack of it. Trackday people are not like bar posers or gas station "badasses" who say things like "I never EVER get below 12,000 rpms when I'm riding the street" (actual quote).
Anybody who loves sportbike riding enough to hit the racetrack is deserving of respect.

One thing you can do to make life easier on anyone behind or passing you is to be predictable and smooth. Suddenly changing your line is the road equivalent of rapidly jerking into the next lane on the interstate without signaling or taking a right hand turn from the left lane at the last second. Not only does smooth = safe, but usually smooth = fast = fun too!
 

·
Dangerously Irish
Joined
·
9,552 Posts

·
Big ol pile of them bones
Joined
·
1,619 Posts
So I'll be doing my first track day soon and was wondering if anyone has any tips for a novice? Any techniques and info is greatly appreciated! Waiting on a race suit to come in and I'm headed to Jennings!


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
Make sure you have good tires, that track is brutal on them. When are you going? I'm going back soon too.
 

·
www.1seven1.com
Joined
·
2,064 Posts
My favorite saying is, "it's a lot more fun when you don't fall off." :D

No, really. This is your first of hopefully many days. You'll be hooked, and never look at riding on the street the same way again.

Good advice above. Also, don't push it ... it's much better to be smooth and consistent rather than fast. You'll be hauling ass, but "fast" is pretty relative. I'm sure the trackday vendor has someone to show newbies around the track. Don't be too proud to ask for comments and tag along much of the day. The only people who look stupid are the ones who ACT like they know it all, then bin their bike doing something stupid.

Look your bike over BEFORE you get to the track so you can check that off your list. Ask the trackside tire vendor what pressures to run, and give your tires 2-3 laps at least to warm up.

Also, think ... have a plan every time you go out with one thing you're working on. Body position, braking markers, lines, etc. It's tough to focus on event just one thing for a full lap, much less a session.

** Don't underestimate how mentally overwhelming the whole thing can be. Stay cool and focus. This will really test your concentration skills.

My 2 cents
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I did my first track day last summer and I haven't ridden the R6 on the street anymore. It's seriously addicting. I still run in Novice, so far I've learnt a lot compared to riding with your buddies on the street. Some of them have been already mentioned and you will probably do it, but here you go:

- Forget about lap times, cameras and tape the speedometer. You'll be slow, fact!
- Focus on learning the race line more than anything else.
- Use as few gears as you can so you have on less thing to worry about.
- Don't be harsh on the controls, smooth is fast.
- Use your lower body to move around and your hands to gently operate the controls putting as little weight as you can.
- Keep the balls of your feet on the footpegs at all times.
- The bike has plenty of HP and torque for your first day. Use middle of the RPM range, trying to keep them up will distract you from more important things.
- Don't trail brake, do your braking and gear selection before initiating the turn.
- Dedicate one session to one thing: looking through the turn, body position, line, braking, gears,...
- Ask, ask, ask. You'll be amazed of how eager people is to help you improve.
- Get an instructor and have him follow and tow you for a session. Listen to his opinion and have him do it again. They're not making money, they do it because they like to teach newbies like us.
- Check the rulebook and prepare your bike accordingly before leaving home. You don't want to run around asking where your headlight fuse is right before the start.
- Breath, relax your body and mind and have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
A lot of good tips...thanks guys! Hopefully I'll get out there before the months out!


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

·
...Slow...
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Damn how I wish there was a track a bit closer to me :bash
 

·
pin it to win it
Joined
·
8,081 Posts
I loved Jennings. Look where you wanna go, you can look really far. Esp turn 1-3
The instructors are great use them.
 

·
Waiting for spring...
Joined
·
19 Posts
Start with this, these videos gives a lot of info.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2URRulpDQWM
Ok so I don't want to thread jack too much here but...

I watched a couple of these and at 8:18 of the second video he mentions getting on the gas hard makes the back of the bike rise. How is this possible? It seems to defy physics.

When one gets on the gas hard it shifts weight to the rear ( as he also mentions) and that should compress the spring and shock no? :dunce:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Ok so I don't want to thread jack too much here but...

I watched a couple of these and at 8:18 of the second video he mentions getting on the gas hard makes the back of the bike rise. How is this possible? It seems to defy physics.

When one gets on the gas hard it shifts weight to the rear ( as he also mentions) and that should compress the spring and shock no? :dunce:
It helps realizing that the wheel is attached to the swingarm, not directly to the bike. From http://www.promecha.com.au/myths_misconceptions.htm

Does the rear actually RISE under acceleration?
"Does the rear actually RISE under acceleration? If the swingarm were not connected to the bike via a rear shock, the force of the drivechain would obviously pull the swingarm away from the tail unit and it would spin around the swingarm pivot towards the front wheel. If the bike is moving, will the momentum of the rider force the rear to squat? or will the force of the drivechain still make the rear end rise?" (Question posed by Jack Anstice 10 Jan 2007)


GB

Yes, but it depends. It's not just the chain, but the fact that the tyre is pushing back against the road and so the road is pushing the bottom of the tyre forward, equal and opposite reaction, Newton's 3rd law. Which is after all what causes the bike to accelerate.

Now if you look at the swingarm, it slopes down to the rear axle. So when the tyre is pushing the axle forward, it tries to move forward underneath the swingarm pivot, which lifts the back of the bike. This is easy to check; squeeze the front brake and start feeding out the clutch as though to do a burn-out and the back will rise. This is called "anti-squat" geometry. If you use the rear brake, it will pull down because the force is being applied to the brake caliper rather than the ground.

However, there are 2 complicating factors:


# 1. As you accelerate, the bike tries to tip backward, requiring more "holding up" force from the back suspension. So this tends to compress the back (squat), in opposition to the lifting effect (anti-squat) from the swingarm angle. Depending on how high the centre of gravity is and how steep the swingarm is angled, one of these will win out and the bike will either rise or fall. That's one reason racers sometimes adjust the swingarm pivot up or down, to get just a small rise. Drag racers go the other way... if the bike squats, the CoG is lower and the bike is less likely to wheelie (but more likely to wheelspin).




# 2. If you're in the middle of a corner or riding up a hill, the rear suspension will be more compressed to start with, so there will be less swingarm angle. Hence if you open the throttle mid-corner, the rear is less likely to rise and more likely to squat than when accelerating in a straight line. That's a reason race bikes are often given much stiffer rear springs, to reduce the change in attitude between straights and corners.
 

·
Waiting for spring...
Joined
·
19 Posts
It helps realizing that the wheel is attached to the swingarm, not directly to the bike.


"Now if you look at the swingarm, it slopes down to the rear axle"....
Thanks for the post, I didn't think about the fact the swingarm is angled downward and that's the key difference. I have a decent bit of experience with cars out on the track and this concept really baffled me but all is clear now.

Thanks! :cheers
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top