Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi

As the title indicates, I have an oil leak in one of my forks, and I am thinking about whether to go to a professional or do it myself.

I have seen, apart from consulting the service manual, I have seen the following video to make myself aware of the operation.


The explanations of this man seem very good to me, I think that with the experience I have and amazing videos like this and the service manual I will not have any problem.

The first thing you can see is that I need special tools, I can get it that is not a problem. The problem is my workplace, I would like to have a work table like that man's, but impossible in my apartment, do you think it is a good idea to do that type of repair on the floor of my apartment? I will have problems? That is why I say, if my workplace complicates me, I prefer to take my bike to the store.

I have thought about spare parts All Balls Racing, any suggestions on spare parts? I will also change the steering bearings since I disassemble forks, I had also thought about All Balls for that replacement.

Thanks guys.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
To take the steering stem out you need to put a jack under the engine smartly or hang the frame from above. The fork requires a upside down (shortened to "usd") fork compresser. Mine was about $200 USD. There are cheap ones also, if you don't plan on rebuilding both fork legs 2 plus times per year. Oil weight and type are a debate. I will be putting maxima 5wt in mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
The only things I don't do are tires, paint, weld. Car suspension I've done, but with that, I dropped only the forks off at the bike shop. Looking at that video, no regrets. But I also had plenty of other stuff to do with the bike at the time. If that's your only project and don't mind owning an expensive and highly specialized tool, go for it. (...may be able to borrow that tool...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
To take the steering stem out you need to put a jack under the engine smartly or hang the frame from above. The fork requires a upside down (shortened to "usd") fork compresser. Mine was about $200 USD. There are cheap ones also, if you don't plan on rebuilding both fork legs 2 plus times per year. Oil weight and type are a debate. I will be putting maxima 5wt in mine.
I found this on a website in my country, for about 100$

Tensor del muelle de la horquilla invertida

Also this kit, with oil included:

Fork Seals Dust Seals & Silkolene Oil for Yamaha YZF-R6 600 YZF R6 2005 | eBay

It is not the same grade as you indicate, yes, I would do a proper maintenance.

The only things I don't do are tires, paint, weld. Car suspension I've done, but with that, I dropped only the forks off at the bike shop. Looking at that video, no regrets. But I also had plenty of other stuff to do with the bike at the time. If that's your only project and don't mind owning an expensive and highly specialized tool, go for it. (...may be able to borrow that tool...)
Well, I have other things to do, like the transmission kit, it is the original and already has 24.000 miles, the chain makes noise and especially when I drive for the first time in the day. And it has more stretched sections than others and it is impossible to tension the chain correctly.

And if when I remove the forks, I will also change steering bearings, since for miles it is better to do it now. I don't need any tools for that, well yes, a bearing race extractor, since last time I had to use a screwdriver and a hammer to extract them.

A mechanic will cost me about $ 200, if I buy the tools I will spend practically the same but for the next time I will not spend any money.

I do not dare to only take the forks, I do not know in the United States but here the mechanics get angry if you take them "half done" to save money. I will not forget the face of a mechanic, when I bring him 4 spark plugs that he had at home, his look almost killed me hahaha.

Fork Oil Level Tool - Motion Pro

https://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-0...ywords=fork+seal+driver&qid=1603237166&sr=8-7

Amazon.com: Orange Cycle Parts 5 in 1 Damper Rod Bleed Tool by Motion Pro 08-0648: Automotive

I hope that I can do the operation well on the floor of my apartment, since I do not have any vise, I have seen one like this, but I do not know what to think, since I doubt that it has a lot of strength, and is not designed to carry out work very hard.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/STANLEY-MA...&qid=1603238944&s=diy&sr=1-3&ts_id=1939082031

Thanks guys.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
That tool will take the fork apart. Look into a method to hold the damper rod.. reassembly is when you can't drop it to fall inside the leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Mechanic says 'bring the whole bike' to tune the engine... yes. Mechanic says 'bring the whole bike' to replace the fork seals... no. If mechanic tells you that, find another mechanic. Him not having to disassemble the front end of the bike to get them, then reassemble it, saves quite a lot of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,006 Posts
this job can get messy. you might spill the oil on the floor. what you should do if it's winter where you live just send them or take them to a shop that does suspension work. let them do it and if you have the money buy new springs for match your weight if you are heavier or lighter than the stock springs are designed for. it makes a huge difference. you'd be very surprised how good it works with the proper springs and new oil.

oh and you will need the 43mm fork seal driver. make sure you order the correct one. he says so also in the video. it's 43.
 

·
LHRB
Joined
·
108 Posts
Maybe give this a try first?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
That tool will take the fork apart. Look into a method to hold the damper rod.. reassembly is when you can't drop it to fall inside the leg.
This is the rod capture tool, if i'm not mistaken.

Amazon.com: Orange Cycle Parts 5 in 1 Damper Rod Bleed Tool by Motion Pro 08-0648: Automotive

Mechanic says 'bring the whole bike' to tune the engine... yes. Mechanic says 'bring the whole bike' to replace the fork seals... no. If mechanic tells you that, find another mechanic. Him not having to disassemble the front end of the bike to get them, then reassemble it, saves quite a lot of time.
You are absolutely right, but there are mechanics who will bother not to charge you for that supposed "half hour" of disassembling and assembling the fork of the motorcycle.

I will do it myself, if I have been able to do everything so far, that some forks do not stop me, I hope I am not wrong.


oh and you will need the 43mm fork seal driver. make sure you order the correct one. he says so also in the video. it's 43.
Ok i won't forget about it.

Maybe give this a try first?

I did not know that tool, I have seen that on eBay it would cost me about $ 40 and I would have it at the latest on November 3 at my house.

But now that I think about it, couldn't you use a feeler gauge for example?

It wouldn't do the same function as that tool, I just have to find the correct thickness, what do you guys think?

That could be the problem, it would be a good option before you start buying more expensive tools.

IMG_20201022_184741942.jpg


Let's hope it's not too late, I don't know when I could have lost oil, at the moment the bike is unused.

Thanks again guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,006 Posts
I'd also buy one of motion pro fork bullets. It keeps the seal lips from getting damaged when you slip them over the tube edge. You could use a heavy plastic bag for this.
And also get the fork oil level tool. It's a very accurate way to make the oil level exact
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Yes, the height is the spec once you pump the air out.. not a volume.
 

·
Tires tell no lies
Joined
·
706 Posts
I pull the fork that is leaking and take it to a suspension guy trackside. $100 cash. Includes oil and parts. You cant beat that. Also the risk of not doing it correctly and spending money on the tools for something you will do every 5 years or so is just not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
A friend of mine has given me the number of a store where it would cost me $ 120 for the two forks. Very good price.

I've been thinking about it, I appreciate all your points of view, I think the best thing would be for me to take them to the store, I'm not happy about it since I like to learn everything possible.

Emulating the tool that the partner @Pard proposed for:

I remove the dust seal and with a 0.020 inch feeler gauge check for dirt accumulated between the oil seal and the fork itself. No traces of dirt, apparently the oil seal is broken.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The price was not the end, the owner of the store did not add the taxes and the price is higher, well I will leave the story aside. In the end I will repair myself.

I have the following doubts, about the loads of the forks, the video confused me a bit and I am not a native speaker.

Isn't it better to leave all the sets at the minimum? Change the seals and mount the forks, then when they are mounted on the bike, return the sets as before?


IMG_20201027_020341336.jpg

Well, the lightest position would be 8, it would have to have 7 lines in sight, I think I understood that well.

IMG_20201027_021023223.jpg

Here my question is worth with the Rebound , the service manual says that the minimum adjustment is 10 clicks in direction b, but with the screw fully turned in position a.

That means that previously, I will have to put the extension to the maximum, right?

But the service manual says, do not exceed those clicks, that has dislodged me, does the screw have a stop? What I mean is that it does not have an end, does it keep spinning or will it stop at the maximum?

IMG_20201027_020355629.jpg

The same with compression, the same doubt with clicks.

Thanks guys.
 

·
YZFR6... ooodles of HP
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
The detent clicks stop each direction. Only lighty turn it. Then when that light pressure gets tight you are at the end and do NOT force it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The detent clicks stop each direction. Only lighty turn it. Then when that light pressure gets tight you are at the end and do NOT force it.
Well, the former owner modified the spring preload, of there is my doubt.

I think to see your explanation understood, here a video, according to the service manual the normal position "oem" is what it gives me to understand.

It is 6, it has 10 positions, 10 being the minimum and 1 the maximum, that only gives 9 spins in either of those two positions. I could only give 5 to reach 1, that means that no set of those has been modified.


No more clicks after 5 spins, it seems to me that that was the maximum.

Thanks guys.

P.D: Im waiting for the tools,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I already have almost all the tools, I only have the fork oil gauge, it has not arrived yet.

But I am writing you because of the following, I thought that the damper rod bleed it is not necessary, I could make one, when disassembling the fork I would measure the thread of the rod, and then it would be a matter of going to the hardware store for a thread of the same size and weld a rod, you would have the tool.

I could also try this magnetic tool that I have at home.

IMG_20201031_163009170.jpg

But I prefer the first option.

Regards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Hi guys

Still waiting for some tools, I write again to show the oil I have gotten and the 1 dollar damper rod bleed I have made.

I have been learning about it and I think it is an M10 measurement, it is a link nut and a construction rod. I tried to get the oil that you told me, but I have not seen it anywhere and bought online it was somewhat expensive and the shipping was late.


SHOCK OIL FL - Motul

It is a multigrade oil 2.5W-20W. I don't think it gives me any problem.

IMG_20201109_222918552.jpg

IMG_20201109_223216707.jpg

On the other hand, I wanted to ask you a question related to the fork.

I have watched a few videos too, and I think these are confusing me. I plan to follow the service manual, put all my sets in 0 or rather in the softest tension and proceed to disassembly.

But what I don't understand is when finishing the assembly they put the clicks back on the rebound damping.

The service manual does not say anything about putting the original clicks, I had thought about putting all the original sets at the end of the assembly, not during assembly.

Is there a reason for that? I do not understand that part, if it is necessary to do it because the service manual does not say anything, where could I get more detailed information about that?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I already have all the tools I need, I think I made a mistake in the fork oil, in the end I have acquired this one.

IMG_20201117_230651445.jpg

I still have the doubt of the assembly, as I said in my previous message, in the first video that I show at minute 23:00 it readjusts the clicks that it had previously, but my question is, why does it do it?

The service manual does not say such a thing, I thought about installing the fork completely and then resetting all the values

Another question, I plan to support the hydraulic jack on the engine manifolds, they told me that I could break them, what do you think?

If so I will have to remove.

Thanks.
 

·
Touchdown!
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
To take the steering stem out you need to put a jack under the engine smartly or hang the frame from above. The fork requires a upside down (shortened to "usd") fork compresser. Mine was about $200 USD. There are cheap ones also, if you don't plan on rebuilding both fork legs 2 plus times per year. Oil weight and type are a debate. I will be putting maxima 5wt in mine.

376067
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top