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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So a couple weeks ago I got into a real bad tank slapper going about 140-150. After 10 seconds of violent tank slapping I literally recovered it (I thank god.) My days of A to B racing on detroit highways are over and ready to mature myself on the track. Ever since my tank slapper a couple weeks ago my front end feels light at speeds of 110 and up and I feels I can go into another headshake whether i'm running 110+ higher on straights or in turns.

I'm unsure if it's my bike or my nerves playing tricks on me that i'm still a bit shook from the slapper that the slightest bit of uneasiness to the front in high speeds will worry me. The front end just doesn't seem planted and i'm not even gunning it through gears hard at high speeds.

I've owned two r6's, 2008 and my current 2012. I pushed them 140+ on highways all the time. My r6 is completely stock and will be investing into a steering dampener next. Even though at those speeds I should have one, I had complete confidence in both bikes before at those speeds where the front end didn't feel it was going to give out on smooth highway from just simply riding fast.

Where should I start checking on bike. tire pressure? Ride sag suspension?
 

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Yamaha Blue in any color
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Check your rebound. Push the bike forward and grab the front brake lever. The front will dive, then rebound back up. You want it to rebound quickly but not pogo up and down.

The feeling of the front end not being planted in the corners is almost always fast rebound.


:YEA
After loose head bearings and geometry, in my experience. The current line of R6 is a pretty damn good machine in my opinion, and I believe headshake is an indicator of something in technique or basic setup.
 

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grab the front brake and push down on the front end, if you feel anything at all, your head bearings are loose. I had this on my race bike, and would nasty head shake on the straights enough that racers behind me would slow down waiting for the bike to flick me off.

another test is have someone sit on the bike to stabilize it, and stand in front of the bike, grab the front brake and compress the forks by pulling down while squatting a bit.
 

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nom nom nom nom nom nom
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grab the front brake and push down on the front end, if you feel anything at all, your head bearings are loose. I had this on my race bike, and would nasty head shake on the straights enough that racers behind me would slow down waiting for the bike to flick me off.

another test is have someone sit on the bike to stabilize it, and stand in front of the bike, grab the front brake and compress the forks by pulling down while squatting a bit.
:laugh That's one way to keep people from passing you.
 

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Touchdown!
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I experienced the same problem as you at triple digit speeds. My remedy was properly setting my sag, rebound, compression, and this:



 

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I experienced the same problem as you at triple digit speeds. My remedy was properly setting my sag, rebound, compression, and this:



That is the smart approach, but most will skip straight to the red. There is nothing wrong with adding a damper, but it should be done the way you did; after the chassis is sorted. Otherwise it will likely mask other symptoms. In my opinion, of course.
 

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Touchdown!
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That is the smart approach, but most will skip straight to the red. There is nothing wrong with adding a damper, but it should be done the way you did; after the chassis is sorted. Otherwise it will likely mask other symptoms. In my opinion, of course.
Thanks. I did quite a bit o' reading before remedying the situation.

The only down side to this is:

My bike handles so f'ing phenomenally now, that I'm pushing it much harder than I pushed it before. I say this is a down side as I already rode and pushed it really hard before the addition, and now, I'm riding that much harder. Riding this serious, a mistake can happen; I pray one doesn't.
 

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all about suspension
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That is the smart approach, but most will skip straight to the red. There is nothing wrong with adding a damper, but it should be done the way you did; after the chassis is sorted. Otherwise it will likely mask other symptoms. In my opinion, of course.
+1

your bike is a few years old, when the ride changes and you made no changes....tires, geometry, suspension settings....worn tires, and as mentioned before steering head bearings are the best options.
 
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