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I ride like I mean it
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With a compensation cheque for AU$160 heading my way from the pig****ing swine mechanics in Melbourne CBD, for their hatchetjob 2 pads on one side of my rear rotor, i am thinking its worth re-investing that money into the bike, via the greasy paws of a different set of mechanics.

They quoted me $2-225 for a fitted front tyre.

And I am wondering if it may make another job cheaper to have it done when the front wheel is off the forks...a few months back when asking friends what i could do to make the bike ride more sweetly, they all suggested in unison, have the front fork oil changed. I have had the bike 4 years, and its 13 years old. When the front fork oil was last changed, I have no idea.

In this case, after such a long period of non changing, would replacing the fork oil deliver a definite change in the ride???

And would it be a job economical to combine with a front tyre change?
 

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I change my fork oil every 2 years. If i road track I would probably do it annually. Fork oil is like any other oil, It breaks down and then does not function the way it was intended, thus causing unnecessary wear and tear as well as loss of performance in your forks. When I first changed mine out, I was shocked at how dirty it was. Removing your forks is longer job then just removing the front tire is. I do my own maintenance so I change out my fork oil when I change my front tire to kill two birds with one stone. The shop may give you a bit of a discount if you get it done at the same time since they are already removing the front tire, that is time that can be removed from the fork oil change service.
 

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first of all you cannot get all the fork oil out of them unless they're taken all the way apart. that means pulling the internals out and pumping the oil out of the valving.
so this job is best done by a suspension shop or a mechanic qualified to do this kind of work.
and yeah this should be done every 2-3 years of street use.
 

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first of all you cannot get all the fork oil out of them unless they're taken all the way apart. that means pulling the internals out and pumping the oil out of the valving.
so this job is best done by a suspension shop or a mechanic qualified to do this kind of work.
and yeah this should be done every 2-3 years of street use.
:sing Please disregard this advice.

If youre on a budget its real simple to change your fork oil.
First loosen the cap from the fork leg while its clamped in the triple. (big adjustable)
Remove the fork leg from the bike... and remove the cap. Dump contents into
a container you can measure the amount of fluid from. Pour some distillates like kerosene in the forks and compress them a few times to rinse out any debris.
Turn upside down and drain into a clean pan. Refill the shocks with new fluid from a container. Its important to know how much fluid you are putting in the forks because too much will "stiffen" the fork travel. Be sure the clean the fork leg and wiper/seal area with some mild degreaser. Check the seals for cracks or imperfections on the stancion. Reinstall fork.
 

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hmm im wondering how much is a fork oil change going to cost.
If you hand a shop a set of forks...If it was more than $75 run away. Now if they have to remove the forks from the bike... youre looking at a few hours labor.
Fork oil is cheap... like $6/qt. Labor costs money!
 

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Here on Vancouver Island, Canada, there is guy here that is very well known for his suspension work and If i bring him my front forks, he charges 100 or 150 CAD I believe for a full service.
 

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You should replace the strut oil in your cars too. How frequent? Don't know. But it stands to reason that you should do this as often as you do with your bikes.
 

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first of all you cannot get all the fork oil out of them unless they're taken all the way apart. that means pulling the internals out and pumping the oil out of the valving.
so this job is best done by a suspension shop or a mechanic qualified to do this kind of work.
and yeah this should be done every 2-3 years of street use.
Please disregard this advice.

If youre on a budget its real simple to change your fork oil.
First loosen the cap from the fork leg while its clamped in the triple. (big adjustable)
Remove the fork leg from the bike... and remove the cap. Dump contents into
a container you can measure the amount of fluid from. Pour some distillates like kerosene in the forks and compress them a few times to rinse out any debris.
Turn upside down and drain into a clean pan. Refill the shocks with new fluid from a container. Its important to know how much fluid you are putting in the forks because too much will "stiffen" the fork travel. Be sure the clean the fork leg and wiper/seal area with some mild degreaser. Check the seals for cracks or imperfections on the stancion. Reinstall fork.
You can only get about 90% of the oil out. You can hang them upside down over night to get a little more. When i do mine and pullbthe leg apart and pump the cartridge another 2/3 of a cup comes out and is super dirty.
And why would anyone at this point not replace the seals. So pulling the tubes apart is required. 1 extra step that allows you to flush the forks 100% in the process.
Dont fill your forks with kerosene. Stop giving out bad advise before you ruin the guys bike or get him hurt.
 

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You can only get about 90% of the oil out. You can hang them upside down over night to get a little more. When i do mine and pullbthe leg apart and pump the cartridge another 2/3 of a cup comes out and is super dirty.
And why would anyone at this point not replace the seals. So pulling the tubes apart is required. 1 extra step that allows you to flush the forks 100% in the process.
Dont fill your forks with kerosene. Stop giving out bad advise before you ruin the guys bike or get him hurt.
your idiocy knows no bounds. :thumbdown
Why would you replace an undamaged seal? You understand what distillates are, correct?
Also this advice is for standard, unmodified forks. Units with custom cartridges, shim stacks, valving or coatings require more attention to detail.
Of course you would not understand this.
Have you qualified to ride in any Orgs expert group yet?
You could tech yourself in at Jennings GP as an expert and then we can wager on how many sessions you ride until Race Control bumps you down to intermediate for being a chicane. :D
 

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You can only get about 90% of the oil out. You can hang them upside down over night to get a little more. When i do mine and pullbthe leg apart and pump the cartridge another 2/3 of a cup comes out and is super dirty.
And why would anyone at this point not replace the seals. So pulling the tubes apart is required. 1 extra step that allows you to flush the forks 100% in the process.
Dont fill your forks with kerosene. Stop giving out bad advise before you ruin the guys bike or get him hurt.
your idiocy knows no bounds.

Why would you replace an undamaged seal? You understand what distillates are, correct?
Also this advice is for standard, unmodified forks. Units with custom cartridges, shim stacks, valving or coatings require more attention to detail.
Of course you would not understand this.
Have you qualified to ride in any Orgs expert group yet?
You could tech yourself in at Jennings GP as an expert and then we can wager on how many sessions you ride until Race Control bumps you down to intermediate for being a chicane.
Can you run lap times with Rossi? Didnt think so. That means you dont know how to change fork oil.
 

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So, I noticed in another thread, (click here), that someone wanted to replace a single fork arm. I'm assuming that he's not just doing the tube, but the internals as well. It has been my understanding from working with other vehicle types, that *all* suspension and braking should be done in pairs where applicable. Someone else there, at least initially, suggested otherwise.

@yamahacrazy, what are your thoughts on that? What would a rider notice in having one strut/damper and/or spring, perform differently on the left versus right side? Bump steer? Bent axle? Visible tire wire characteristics? Thanks.
 

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So, I noticed in another thread, (click here), that someone wanted to replace a single fork arm. I'm assuming that he's not just doing the tube, but the internals as well. It has been my understanding from working with other vehicle types, that *all* suspension and braking should be done in pairs where applicable. Someone else there, at least initially, suggested otherwise.

@yamahacrazy, what are your thoughts on that? What would a rider notice in having one strut/damper and/or spring, perform differently on the left versus right side? Bump steer? Bent axle? Visible tire wire characteristics? Thanks.
the forks can be done independent. some bikes like the older (just a few years ago) R1 had one fork for rebound and the other for compression. so they were doing 2 different jobs independent of each other. most bikes have the forks identical with rebound and compression in both forks. but they don't necessarily have to be.
it's different from cars because on a motorcycle the forks are attached to the same wheel. I've even heard of some having two different spring strengths.
brake pads you will want to do together. but that's the only thing.
 

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Motosylum Racing #132
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So, I noticed in another thread, (click here), that someone wanted to replace a single fork arm. I'm assuming that he's not just doing the tube, but the internals as well. It has been my understanding from working with other vehicle types, that *all* suspension and braking should be done in pairs where applicable. Someone else there, at least initially, suggested otherwise.

@yamahacrazy, what are your thoughts on that? What would a rider notice in having one strut/damper and/or spring, perform differently on the left versus right side? Bump steer? Bent axle? Visible tire wire characteristics? Thanks.
Yeah, you can replace just one. It would be smart to have it serviced before putting it in but it is fine. A great number of racing forks have dampening separated between the forks- one does compression and the other does rebound. Racers often run different spring rates in each fork. I keep a .95 in one and change the other between .85 and 1.0 depending on the track and what I'm trying to accomplish. Now I need to keep a stock of springs lol
 
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