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Discussion Starter #1
Should I put Fuel Stabilizer when the temperature drops? even if I do a semi-winter storage?


What I mean by a semi- winter storage is I will be riding the bike around at least 1 mile a week during the time the temperatures drop below 20 degrees in the night time and below 30 during the day time. Most likely January - February.

Would it still be ideal to add the fuel stabilizer? or should this only be done when the bike will sit and not be started for 2 - 3 months?
 

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Why would you be riding it in 20 degree weather? You'd be better off just doing a full winter storage including oil change, fuel stabilizer, and battery tender.
 

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ready to race
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mixed feelings on fuel stable.....i have used sea foam for the past few yrs( even during riding season) with no problem but the other option is to fill the tank with the highest octane fuel you can get and don't worry about it. Some say that stable just forms a film on top of the gas..and when it gets re agitated (start riding again) it does not break up properly and fudges the fuel system. i have a bike that gets filled to the rim every year for storage and never had a problem for 25 yrs ..i started using a specific stabilizer and had to pull the carbs off and clean them this summer because the bike was running like s*&#@....hope this helps but it's your call.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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if used per directions on the bottle, it wouldn't be a bad idea to use all the time. Especially if the bike will sit awhile. Also keep the tank full. If you have ethanol in your pump gas, this is even more important.
 

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....Casper....
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If you're going to be riding 1 mile a week, what does that tell you?
tells me he's gonna be a cold mo-fo for 1 mile a week :eek:

probably not going to affect anything no matter what you do, if you're only going to store it for 2 months just fill it up and get a battery tender. if you were storing it for 5-6 months maybe a bigger deal
 

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Horsepower Whisperer
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I've had great luck for decades using Seafoam.
Snowmobiles, motorcycles, mowers, wackers, boat motors, chain saws, snowblowers, atvs...

Scientists have shown that Sta-bil can gel in todays corn based fuel.
Google it. :fact
 

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Yeah Science!
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I've had great luck for decades using Seafoam.
Snowmobiles, motorcycles, mowers, wackers, boat motors, chain saws, snowblowers, atvs...

Scientists have shown that Sta-bil can gel in todays corn based fuel.
Google it. :fact
Really? Well shit, my bike ha been sitting for about 5-6 months with a mix of the red Sta-bil and blue ethanl treatment Sta-bil. I put in probably a little over the recommended. I'll be riding it soon again on the street so won't be needing a fuel stabilizer anytime soon after I run through the tank. Will it gel up in 6 months or does it take a bit longer?
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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ethanol "enriched" fuel (e10 at our US pumps) phase separates in as little as 3 months. google "ethanol phase separation". Ethanol is nothing more than the octane booster that refineries have to add to fuel so out engines won't ping to death. There was an octane booster that was added that did not break down and cause problems like the ethanol does, but it was outlawed by government/epa and had to be out by around 2006 or so.
ethanol sucks for fuel systems, but has been wonderful for our fuel injector service
 

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YZF-R6 Fighter Pilot
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the regular red fuel stabilizer is supposed to have a new formula that is made to fight corrosion in todays higher ethanol fuels. At least thats what it says on the bottle. I store my bike 4-5 months a year. I have had the bike for 9 years, and I have used the red stabilizer in it every winter with no problems.
 

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if used per directions on the bottle, it wouldn't be a bad idea to use all the time. Especially if the bike will sit awhile. Also keep the tank full. If you have ethanol in your pump gas, this is even more important.
Every motorcycle winterization check list you read will tell you to fill your tank and add fuel stabilizer and I'll be the first to admit that I follow those instruction on most of my vehicles. The truth is that this is completely false if your were to leave your bike sit for more than three months.

The amount of condensation that could occur in such a small tank would be virtually nothing compared to the amount ethanol separation after the 3 month mark even if taken the most extreme example. Assuming you take a 4 gallon and ride it to almost empty on a very cold day with 100% humidity, park it in your heated garage, and open the fuel cap to check the fuel level, then close it and store it for winter. The total amount of condensation wouldn't equal 0.02 ounces. The amount of ethanol separation would far exceed that on a full 4 gallon tank after 3 months.

So what's the best way? Ideally, store your tank almost empty then add fresh gasoline before your first ride. This of course is only ideal if you plan on actually storing the bike and not starting it over the winter.

I have all the actual mathematical calculations done for supercharged racing engines on jet skis stored from November to March, but the premise is still the same.
 

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Nothing lasts forever.
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Every motorcycle winterization check list you read will tell you to fill your tank and add fuel stabilizer and I'll be the first to admit that I follow those instruction on most of my vehicles. The truth is that this is completely false if your were to leave your bike sit for more than three months.

The amount of condensation that could occur in such a small tank would be virtually nothing compared to the amount ethanol separation after the 3 month mark even if taken the most extreme example. Assuming you take a 4 gallon and ride it to almost empty on a very cold day with 100% humidity, park it in your heated garage, and open the fuel cap to check the fuel level, then close it and store it for winter. The total amount of condensation wouldn't equal 0.02 ounces. The amount of ethanol separation would far exceed that on a full 4 gallon tank after 3 months.

So what's the best way? Ideally, store your tank almost empty then add fresh gasoline before your first ride. This of course is only ideal if you plan on actually storing the bike and not starting it over the winter.

I have all the actual mathematical calculations done for supercharged racing engines on jet skis stored from November to March, but the premise is still the same.
So if I leave the tank almost empty like you say and create a vacuum in the tank with lets say some kind of suction device, there should be even less condensation?
 

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I hate bike thieves
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Migrate to Tx during winter. It's like 75 degrees today

Sent from my scrotum using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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the thing many are not understanding about the e10 fuels, is that it won't tolerate even tiny amounts of water.. the old mtbe fuels pre2006, could have a decent amount of water, and mix up and still burn. the e10 fuels will NOT mix with even a small amount of moisture in the system especially if the fuel begins to phase separate. That moisture comes from the condensation forming in an empty tank, and even as small an amount as that may be, is it worth it? And as you will have old fuel in the lines anyway, you would be better off storing with a full tank and draining the fuel with stabilizer to use in your lawn mower. The full tank will help inhibit rust too..

but do what ya want. I see zero benefit from storing with an empty tank other than saving a few minutes in the spring when you get to pour new gas in vs. draining the old gas first.. if you even would need to drain it if it has the prescribed amount of fuel stabil added.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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In Canada shell 95 octain has no ethenol...that's what I use for storage in the tank
just because the pump doesn't say "contains ethanol" does not mean it is ethanol free. Many states here do not require the stickers on the pumps. If your pump clearly says "ETHANOL FREE" then you are good..
 

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the thing many are not understanding about the e10 fuels, is that it won't tolerate even tiny amounts of water.. the old mtbe fuels pre2006, could have a decent amount of water, and mix up and still burn. the e10 fuels will NOT mix with even a small amount of moisture in the system especially if the fuel begins to phase separate. That moisture comes from the condensation forming in an empty tank, and even as small an amount as that may be, is it worth it? And as you will have old fuel in the lines anyway, you would be better off storing with a full tank and draining the fuel with stabilizer to use in your lawn mower. The full tank will help inhibit rust too..

but do what ya want. I see zero benefit from storing with an empty tank other than saving a few minutes in the spring when you get to pour new gas in vs. draining the old gas first.. if you even would need to drain it if it has the prescribed amount of fuel stabil added.

Like I said, I fill my tank, use stabilizer, and drain the tank in the spring (I put it in my wife's car which makes her happy, hehehe). My main point was for the average person that stores their bike over the winter and plans on letting it sit for 3 month or more and does not want to drain gas in the spring (which is quite a lot of people on this forum), it doesn't make any difference if you fill your tank and use stabilizer or leave your tank empty and save a few bucks.

Or more simply put, a full tank of gas is just as harmful as an empty tank, just for different reasons.
 

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ready to race
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noted..regarding the ethanol..as far as leaving the tank empty i would never do that..look at how many people selling older bikes have rusty old fuel tanks (inside) and have to coat them...my 81 CB 750 F tank(32 yrs old) on the inside looks like it just came from the dealer.....no room for condensation means NO rust... if your not shure how good the fuel will be in the spring drain it and use it in the lawn mower...just my opinion.
 
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