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NoAgendaRacing
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had searched all over trying to find the castle nut needed for the rear axle on my 2008 R6, google did manage to find me the answer but it took way more searching than it should so here is what I found.

For the 2008, so I believe it would work 06+, not sure about older models. The DORMAN Axle/Spindle Lock Nut Kit Part Number 05138 works great.



I purchase mine off of eBay, found one for under $7 shipped. You may be able to find them at a local AutoZone or O'Reily's, my local ones did not have them.
https://www.google.com/search?q=Dorman+AutoGrade+-+Spindle+Lock+Nut+Kit+Part+#+05138&oq=Dorman+AutoGrade+-+Spindle+Lock+Nut+Kit+Part+#+05138&aqs=chrome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8
**update 4/13/2015 I found the nut on Amazon, with Prime shipping, for <$10. I also changed the link above because O'reily changed up their page, but the new link does a google search and should show multiple sources

The reason you would use this nut is to allow you to drill a hole in the axle and then use a pin to stop the nut from coming loose. You can drill through the OEM nut, but its a pain from what I have read, and some people have drill through the axle at on the threads exposed beyond the OEM nut. Being an aviation maintenance guy since high school, I prefer using a castle nut.

The new nut is a 36mm, as opposed to the OEM nut that is 32mm, so if you don't have one already, you will need a 36mm socket

I am using a quick release pin due to Pit Bull Trailer Restraint System, you could use a cotter pin of any sort.


 

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I picked up one from ebay, will see about drilling my axle this spring. Do you know roughly how many mm in you drilled the hole?
 

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NoAgendaRacing
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I picked up one from ebay, will see about drilling my axle this spring. Do you know roughly how many mm in you drilled the hole?
Not off the top of my head, if the bike was at my house I would measure it for you. I Just installed the new nut, to torque, then marked it with a sharpie. Don't plan to drill at the very base of the pocket, or you might not be able to actually install a pin after it is on the bike, without over tightening it.



Also, USE A DRILL PRESS! The first axle I did i tried doing this with a hand held power drill and the holes didn't really line up. After buying another axle off eBay, I marked the spot to drill then installed the nut onto the removed axle and used that to hold it in the vise for the drill press. that way you can be more certain that the exit hole will align with a slot in the nut.
 

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Reads the rulez
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There's zero need to buy a new axle nut to safety wire it correctly. I'll take a pic of mine when I get home tonight. Stock one works just fine.
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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there is also a PN from a subaru that will work too. I have the part in my toolbox. its a common swap done on R1s. :secret
 

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There's zero need to buy a new axle nut to safety wire it correctly. I'll take a pic of mine when I get home tonight. Stock one works just fine.
Interested, post a pic when you get a chance. This is the last bit I need wired and I would like to see what others have done.
 

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NoAgendaRacing
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Discussion Starter #8
If you want a quicker way to get the nut secured and then unsecured when you need to do a quick stop, then I think this works best. But no, it is not the only way to go about it.
 

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Reads the rulez
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Here's what I did. I torqued the nut to the torque spec I wanted, which was 45 ft lbs. Yes I know some will go all "Ehhh mah gawd the factory torque spec is higher than that!!!" Well, piss off, it doesn't need to be that high. I promise.

With that out of the way, I used my spring loaded center punch and marked where I wanted to drill. It's a real mother effer getting the drill bit started "straight", which is at an angle of the surface of the nut. So, I center punched the same spot about 10-15 times to get a dent deep enough to start the drill bit. Obviously, you don't want to start drilling too far down on the flat of the nut itself - otherwise the spring clip will interfere with the axle.

Now, the only thing you'll have to do is also mark the top of the axle on the other side. The reason being, because of where the threads start on the axle. If the axle is "upside down" from where you drilled the nut, the side drilled for the axle nut will be exactly 180 degrees off (Because the axle is upside down). I used my center punch and make 3 indents on the shoulder of the axle. So, when I install it, I just make sure the dots are facing up - and I'm good to go. With only one flat of the nut drilled, I know every time I torque the nut, every time it's in the proper spot to insert the spring clip, I know it's torqued to 45 ft lbs.
 

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Here's what I did. I torqued the nut to the torque spec I wanted, which was 45 ft lbs. Yes I know some will go all "Ehhh mah gawd the factory torque spec is higher than that!!!" Well, piss off, it doesn't need to be that high. I promise.

With that out of the way, I used my spring loaded center punch and marked where I wanted to drill. It's a real mother effer getting the drill bit started "straight", which is at an angle of the surface of the nut. So, I center punched the same spot about 10-15 times to get a dent deep enough to start the drill bit. Obviously, you don't want to start drilling too far down on the flat of the nut itself - otherwise the spring clip will interfere with the axle.

Now, the only thing you'll have to do is also mark the top of the axle on the other side. The reason being, because of where the threads start on the axle. If the axle is "upside down" from where you drilled the nut, the side drilled for the axle nut will be exactly 180 degrees off (Because the axle is upside down). I used my center punch and make 3 indents on the shoulder of the axle. So, when I install it, I just make sure the dots are facing up - and I'm good to go. With only one flat of the nut drilled, I know every time I torque the nut, every time it's in the proper spot to insert the spring clip, I know it's torqued to 45 ft lbs.
I usually prefer a castle nut but might just do that for now, clever torque advice as well. Thanks.
 

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NoAgendaRacing
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Discussion Starter #12
I usually prefer a castle nut but might just do that for now, clever torque advice as well. Thanks.
Similarly, I marked the chain tensioner, and then marker the nut to match the castling. When the nut gets tight, torqued by feel and knowledge from many times torquing, then you can line up the slot on the nut with the hole in the axle without pulling the socket off. I did this to setup for quick wheel changes for our first endurance race, but we ended up not needing to change the tire.
 

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Reads the rulez
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I usually prefer a castle nut but might just do that for now, clever torque advice as well. Thanks.
A castle nut with a cotter pin would definitely be the safest option, but it's not needed at all, especially with the OEM axle nut. The axle nut is already detented (It's a locking nut in itself, where as a castle nut is not).

As long as you follow my habit of using your safety clips, it's impossible to fail. I never hand start any nut or bolt on my bike, then walk away for any reason. I either leave it off, or I torque it to spec. And when I torque it, I safety wire it (Or use the spring clip). So, a quick visual check will tell me if the nut isn't on there period, it obviously needs put on and torqued, and safety wired.

The safety wiring for my bike is on there for looks...so it passes tech. I personally don't need it. Nobody cares more about their wheels falling off than this guy, especially when it's my ass riding it.:lmao
 

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A castle nut with a cotter pin would definitely be the safest option, but it's not needed at all, especially with the OEM axle nut. The axle nut is already detented (It's a locking nut in itself, where as a castle nut is not).

As long as you follow my habit of using your safety clips, it's impossible to fail. I never hand start any nut or bolt on my bike, then walk away for any reason. I either leave it off, or I torque it to spec. And when I torque it, I safety wire it (Or use the spring clip). So, a quick visual check will tell me if the nut isn't on there period, it obviously needs put on and torqued, and safety wired.

The safety wiring for my bike is on there for looks...so it passes tech. I personally don't need it. Nobody cares more about their wheels falling off than this guy, especially when it's my ass riding it.:lmao
Thanks again, I prefer that ease of mind, too, so I will definitely be doing the same.
 

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Reads the rulez
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One last thing I forgot. It's not a big deal at all, but it is handy. If you use a castle nut, you have to remove the cotter pin every time if you use the Pitbull TRS. No need to if you safety wire the stock axle nut.
 

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NoAgendaRacing
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Discussion Starter #16
One last thing I forgot. It's not a big deal at all, but it is handy. If you use a castle nut, you have to remove the cotter pin every time if you use the Pitbull TRS. No need to if you safety wire the stock axle nut.
Thus the quick release pin, not really that big of a deal to undue it and pull it out at the end of the day.
 

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NoAgendaRacing
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517 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Just did this on my new bike, this weekend.

These are the clips i bought from Harbor Freight


Undrilled



Drilled (small holes were from the previous owner's attempt at keeping the OEM nut on)


Pin in


Pin in, from the side
 
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