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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, simple, this is for those that been there, help a brother out. OK, got on bike for first time after crashing.

ok, after getting my bike fixed, I was sitting there cleaning her up. had bike ready for my first ride after crash.
check list
Check all lights
checked gas
oil
blablaba

Get jacket on.
Jeans Pants for now
good gloves
Get helmet on, adjust
Crank on bike
sit on it to get feel
everything seems normal
pop it in gear shuts off
restart in order same results
oops, kick stand down
pop it up
crank bike
in neutral
press clutch pop in gear gently on gas
I get about 100 yards and stop at end of driveway
I look down and my arms are shaking out of there joints.
I relax and cant stop shaking.
I turn around drive bike to house and in garage.
I was horrified to say the least.

HOW DO I GET OVER THIS????
How do I get my confidence back after such a crash? thanks

don
 

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nom nom nom nom nom nom
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1,251 Posts
Well you effed up by putting your gloves on before your helmet.



First time ever riding my R6 was also the first time riding since I highsided my 250 at the track and dislocated my hip. I took the R6 back to the same track for a trackday. I'd be damned if I was going to spend all that money and not ride. It was still a little nerve racking going into the corner that I crashed in, but after a while I was fine.


For a streetbike, I'd say that you should have someone leave you and the bike about an hour away from home on the side of the road. You'll ride it or you'll walk. Unless you are shaking so bad that you can't control the bike. Chew some gum, eat a burger, smoke a cigarette, do some jumping jacks, hum a song, ride with someone you know.
 

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I was surprised to find I'm not the only person I've talked to that always has a bit of anxiety before I go for a ride or hit the track. Seems normal.

But it all goes away once I get rollin.

I'd say you have a bit of healthy anxiety.
I have no advice how to overcome it. But I think you will when you're ready
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Actually u are right bout the gloves . Found that out but had to be honest. I was nervous as you can tell. And yeah. I was shaken bad. I didn't want to risk it. I prefer to be 100% focus and I wasn't so no ride. I plan to try a few times to get further and further. When you put your helmet into a cars bumper and live to tell. It's not easy forgetting that. Trust me.
I'm trying and I be dam if I let it beat me.
Baby steps
But it's dam nerve racking
 

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Meh
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9,250 Posts
Sounds like you may have some level of PTSD - not surprising given the situation you describe.

I'd scour the interwebz for advice on how to deal with that, or go seek out some professional help, depending on how bad it's messing with ya.

I know if I were in your spot - I'd try to take baby steps. Maybe buy some new parts that your stoked about and spend time installing them, basically try to get yourself back into the mindset of "bikes are fun" and less "bikes smash my face into cars and make me almost die".

Don't be too hard on yourself. Get help if you need it.
 

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Pobrecitos
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Been hit twice on the street, went down once as the result of one.

Although I didn't experience the level of anxiety you are exhibiting, I did take a bit of time not to think about it while riding again. I had to push negative thoughts about the previous accidents out of my mind while riding. Lane spitting in heavy traffic is where I'd start to get nervy but I had to focus on another thought for a while.

Also, once the level of anxiety has reached a point where it inhibits your ability to do a certain activity, you need to seek professional help. IMO. I've got a few friends that deal with this and it's really no joke; a few thought they were having legit heart attacks.

just my 1cent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not sure what that stands for but I had a hell of a lot of fun fixing her back up. did all work myself, it was fun. give me a sense of pride to know I did it. I think it would be easier if I had someone to ride with. who wouldn't try to leave me in dust or drive fast. ill come around soon. I have spent the down time getting new jacket, helmet, gloves and so forth.
anyway here she is fixed up last weekend.

 

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Dangerously Irish
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Ok, simple, this is for those that been there, help a brother out. OK, got on bike for first time after crashing.

ok, after getting my bike fixed, I was sitting there cleaning her up. had bike ready for my first ride after crash.
check list
Check all lights
checked gas
oil
blablaba

Get jacket on.
Jeans Pants for now
good gloves
Get helmet on, adjust
Crank on bike
sit on it to get feel
everything seems normal
pop it in gear shuts off
restart in order same results
oops, kick stand down
pop it up
crank bike
in neutral
press clutch pop in gear gently on gas
I get about 100 yards and stop at end of driveway
I look down and my arms are shaking out of there joints.
I relax and cant stop shaking.
I turn around drive bike to house and in garage.
I was horrified to say the least.

HOW DO I GET OVER THIS????
How do I get my confidence back after such a crash? thanks

don

My first crash was a highside due to my arrogance as a new rider.
I remember the bike throwing me off like a flea....
Flying through the air I watched the bike roll off without me time seemed like it was in slow motion. I did at least one or two spins... As I floated suspended through space and time I thought to myself...
"I've been up here for a long time."
That's when I hit the ground hard, few violent rolls, slid for a little bit.

The ground gave me a good thrashing I say. I was forced to lay down for a moment or two. My adrenalin aided me in getting up, I walked over to the bike, Picked up the pieces that came off the bike and stuffed them in my jacket.

Set her up, made sure it ran, no leaks hopped on and went off.


Now, when I thought about the crash later that day. I saw it as positive; to me a crash can be fun... Long as you don't **** the bike too far up or brake any bones. Always remember "any crash you can walk away from is a good one."

With that attitude crashing has never really bothered me. Well, after that highside I did have trouble walking for around 2 weeks, no way in hell I could run or even through my leg over the bike.

But believe me the day I could lift my leg over the seat I was on it again... Then getting off was an issue, the pain. :laugh

In life you can't let any fear rule you, because it cripples the mind. If the mind isn't free then the body cannot react, if the body cannot react mistakes are made. Relieve the burden of your mind.

Get back on the bike and take it slow, go around the block, later go to the store and back and rebuild your confidence, if you cannot do this. You may have to sell the bike, because your fear will become a liability.
 

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My bike hates me
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try to get yourself back into the mindset of "bikes are fun" and less "bikes smash my face into cars and make me almost die".
You have no idea how badly i want to put this onto a t shirt or a decal as a quote!
 

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"Old Slow Guy"
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I would probably just toss on a set of ear buds, and crank up some music that I like to listen to, and try to go on a nice long relaxing ride on my favorite back road. If you have problems with your riding partners running off and leaving you, sorry to say it but, it's time to find new partners. Leaving a rider behind is not right. No matter how slow they are, the group should always stay together (or at least stop more often to let everybody catch up at designated locations. Once the group starts running away from the slower/less experienced riders, they usually feel pressured to try keeping up, riding beyond their own comfort level until bad things happen. The groups I have always ridden with, have one of the best/fastest riders sweep at the back of the pack. That way if something bad does happen, He can catch the rest of the group to turn them around and get help.
 

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I can understand what you're saying. I've crashed a couple times but when I had my first really bad crash it took me 8 weeks to heal and in that time period I already bought another r1. After I healed from my concision sprained neck broken collar bone and the basketball on my hip went away I went through the same check list as you did(except I put my helmet on then my gloves). I threw my leg over my new r1 and sat there for a good minute. Then i realized I'd never get over it until I went back. So I put her in gear and rode down the road where I destroyed myself and my first bucket lost bike. It took a lot to go through that corner again but I did it and it felt amazing. My crash happened in September and it took me a good 3 months of taking it easy before I went out with my buddies and got on it 50% of what I did before. After that i was fine I did downgrade to a 600 (I really didn't want to sell my last r1 but I needed room). Even after that day it took me a lot more seat time to get back to my old riding style and I actually just took my bike and ripped it down the road I crashed on as hard as I could. I went through my near death corner faster then I ever had before it felt amazing. I don't ride on the street much anymore but I did that to prove that that corner could never kill my love for motorcycles and riding/building them.

Take your time get back comfortable. Don't plan on riding just decide you're going to take the bike to grab a movie instead of the car. If you have the passion to rebuild the bike you have the passion to ride it. Just take it easy and you'll be good.
 

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Maybe a stupid question, but have you been on a dirt bike or something similar since? Where you can not worry about the road and just ride at your own pace and get comfortable again? I am the type of person to get back in the saddle after something happens and make myself go through it again with a positive result and then I'm good as new, but that might not be the right move for your situation.

If you were closer I'd go out for a cruise with you bro!


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ok, heres the funny thing, I road bmx fell thousands of time. why is this one different? still haven't road, bad weather to much rain by time I get chance. im dying to ride bike.
 

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My bike hates me
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ok, heres the funny thing, I road bmx fell thousands of time. why is this one different? still haven't road, bad weather to much rain by time I get chance. im dying to ride bike.
I think the thought of having a higher possibility of getting seriously hurt or killed from a street bike has a role in that.. Maybe its because you hear of terrible accidents on sportbikes but not so much BMX and you just sike yourself out?
 

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Fat + S = Fast
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Wow, I've had "The Fear" as I call it make me shamefully slow, but wow... either you had an absolutely horrific crash, or else you have many more and/or much greater reasons to live than I do (neither is hard to do).

But you also seem to very much want to get back on it. First thing to do is ask yourself why that is.
If the answer is because you really miss riding and you want to get back to it... good.
If the answer is because you need to prove to yourself you're still man enough to do it or that you're over the trauma or that you've healed... not so good.

After that the only answer I know is to just push yourself to do it. It's been said many times and many ways, to the point it's a cliché, but the only way to overcome The Fear is to do it anyway, ignore the bad feelings, the hesitation, the trepidation, the <insert synonym for Fear here>. To invoke another cliché, bravery is not the absence of fear, it's the ability to disregard fear.

Funny thing: With the caveat that I disregard horror stories from all camps that involve riders wearing shorts and t-shirts, I hear of way more broken bones and debilitating injuries from the supposedly safer worlds of off-road motorcycling and mountain biking than I do from street motorbikes. Not a scientific observation, but just something I've noticed amongst the people I know who do either or both. Equally funny thing, the last time I did ride a pedal bike I was almost as nervous as the OP described, as being seated so relatively high up on such a short wheelbase I felt like the slightest touch of forebrake would put me, literally, onto my face. Just what you're used to, I guess...

I purposefully got on another bike and rode all the next day after my off. It worked.
That right there is the best possible course of action, but you have to do it ASAphysicallyP. I think the OP is way past that point, but it's good advice for avoiding The Fear in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I'm going for it this weekend. If it's not 100• degrees. I think my mindset is clearing out and I feel much better. I'll go through my check list as I always do. Put gloves on then helmet then take gloves off to put helmet on right. Lol. Joking here. Anyway. I figure hit back roads near creek area. Just taking my sweet time. I'll let ya know how it goes



I guess it's Bobsled time.

Sanka? You alive mon.
No mon I'm dead.
 
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