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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Firstly, hello to anyone who is reading or attempting to help me. I appreciate it. I’ve got an 04 R6 with 40K kilometres. First time doing a valve check/adjustment. I’m at the measuring stage and I’ve run into an obstacle. I’ve followed the instructions in factory service manual word for word multiple times over the procedure hasn’t been working for me. For anyone that has the service manual 3-11 in Checks/Adjustments sections is the page I’m referring to.

Valve clearance
Intake valve - 0.13~0.20mm (0.0051 ~0.0079 in)
Exhaust valve - 0.23~0.30mm (0.0091 ~0.0118 in)
Manual says valve clearance measuring sequence: Cylinder #1 - #2 - #4 - #3
After #1 cylinder crankshaft rotation: cylinder #2 -180° cylinder #4 - 360° cylinder #3 - 540°

I started with Cylinder #1 TDC on the compression stroke with the cam lobes facing away from each other (like the diagram on 3-11). I can get measurements with my feeler gauges at this point. Next step is to turn crankshaft 180° (counterclockwise like the manual instructs) to perform measurements for cylinder #2. HERE is where I am STUCK.

After lining up the timing mark on the pickup rotor (crankshaft) with crankcase mating surface after turning 180°, the camshaft lobes for cylinder #2 now face each other. That is the pointy part of the lobes face each other. I can’t get my thinnest feeler gauge under the lobe for measurement. So following manual no measurement for #2. Now I continue and turn the crankshaft 360° to measure for #4 and the lobes face away from each other and I can measure with my feeler gauges for clearance. 540° for #3 and same issue as #2 cylinder. Cam lobes face inboard instead of outboard and no clearance.

What I did afterward just for the hell of it was turn the crankshaft until the lobes on #2 and #3 faced outboard and tried to measure and it worked for measuring. IS THAT IT? If ignoring the service manual step by step process is the solution to this and just turning the crankshaft until the lobes face outboard is all I have to do then someone please tell me. I’m assuming when they are inboard toward each other they exert pressure on the valve lifter which amounts to ZERO clearance.

As far as I know valve lash/clearance is measured with a piston at top dead centre on the compression stroke like was done in the first step for cylinder #1 where the lobes face away from each other.

I told this same story to a mechanic at a motorcycle shop in town and he said the valve shims may be worn to the point where there is no clearance at all. I don’t know what to think of that considering my measurements for #1 and #4 cylinders which are:

#1 Exhaust (0.20mm)(0.20mm) #4 Exhaust (0.20mm)(0.20mm) <----- All out of spec

#1 Intake (0.15mm)(0.15mm) #4 Intake (0.15mm)(0.15mm) <----- All within spec but just barely

I’ve read on other forums, other posts, YouTube videos (vids didn't detail the entire process because they only demonstrate the clearance check for the first cylinder) and here I am. Basically, the service manual hasn’t worked out and I don’t want to f**k up my motorcycle.

Questions:
Does the measuring sequence matter or can I just turn the crankshaft until the lobes for each cylinder face outboard? Instead of 1-2-4-3 measure 1-2-3-4
When the cam lobes do face outboard for a cylinder is the piston for that cylinder at top dead center on the compression stroke? (Like the very first step for Cylinder #1 because that’s when valve clearance has to be measured not on exhaust stroke)
I’ve read some posts saying counter clockwise rotation is terrible for the engine but the factory service manual says to do just that, rotate CCW. Yes or no?

Posts I've been reading:
 

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I no longer remember very well, and I deleted my videos, but you would have to follow the measurement frequency without problems.

In the end I did not understand why the manual says to turn in reverse. It makes an unpleasant sound. In the end I came to the conclusion that it would be to not activate the oil pump or something similar, since it was leaving me lubricating the cams. But I think it doesn't make a lot of sense.

At the end drain the oil and take measurements by turning normal, clockwise.

Place cylinder 1 in TDC, and follow the sequence specified by the manual, if you upload any photos or manuals where you say you have the problem. I don't have a very good memory ...

But don't worry, the point where you can ruin your bike is to remove the camshaft and then mount them out of sync, ruining valves and so on.

About the tolerances, write down all the valves that are out.

When you remove the camshafts and the pusher, you will see the pad, it will have its thickness in mm, be careful I found some with the numbering erased, in that case you will need a micrometer.

From there you can select the correct slim. The old ones can be used to try to adjust another valve.

Well, if you have a problem, comment on it, if some YouTube videos are left 99% of the process, but there are some good channels, but of course with their defects ..

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I no longer remember very well, and I deleted my videos, but you would have to follow the measurement frequency without problems.

In the end I did not understand why the manual says to turn in reverse. It makes an unpleasant sound. In the end I came to the conclusion that it would be to not activate the oil pump or something similar, since it was leaving me lubricating the cams. But I think it doesn't make a lot of sense.

At the end drain the oil and take measurements by turning normal, clockwise.

Place cylinder 1 in TDC, and follow the sequence specified by the manual, if you upload any photos or manuals where you say you have the problem. I don't have a very good memory ...

But don't worry, the point where you can ruin your bike is to remove the camshaft and then mount them out of sync, ruining valves and so on.

About the tolerances, write down all the valves that are out.

When you remove the camshafts and the pusher, you will see the pad, it will have its thickness in mm, be careful I found some with the numbering erased, in that case you will need a micrometer.

From there you can select the correct slim. The old ones can be used to try to adjust another valve.

Well, if you have a problem, comment on it, if some YouTube videos are left 99% of the process, but there are some good channels, but of course with their defects ..

Regards
Thank you jlcr6, I'll give it another try today.
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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First of all, #1 is the far left cylinder. Secondly, always rotate the crank forward (that would be clockwise when looking at the right side of the engine.). They are probably referring to counter clockwise when looking at the crank from the #1 cylinder in the left.
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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Typically when I do valves on 4 cylinder bikes, (not cross-plane R1’s, obviously) I will put #1 at TDC, measure intake and exhaust. At this point, the #2 intake and #3 exhaust is in position to be measured. Then rotate the engine 360 degrees to put #4 at TDC. Then you can measure all of #4, #2 exhaust, and #3 intake valves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Typically when I do valves on 4 cylinder bikes, (not cross-plane R1’s, obviously) I will put #1 at TDC, measure intake and exhaust. At this point, the #2 intake and #3 exhaust is in position to be measured. Then rotate the engine 369 degrees to put #4 at TDC. Then you can measure all of #4, #2 exhaust, and #3 intake valves.
Thanks 8Ball, I got the measurements done within minutes.
 

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You can just look at the cam lobes and see what's going to end up where and when. Keeping precise track of degrees and firing order and all that isn't really required. Just need to make sure goes back together the exact same way it came aprt. I used paint marks on the sprockets and chain to make sure it went back together as it came apart. Use more than one mark on each, with uneven spacing. The "stars" can only line up one possible way. No need to loosen or separate the sprockets from the cams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
What is the proper loosening and tightening sequence of the camshaft cap bolts? I watched these YouTube videos:
Skip ahead to 1:50. The guy in the vid has the loosening sequence written down on paper at this point.
Skip ahead to 3:54. That's where he starts tightening down the caps.

Is disassembly of the camshaft caps opposite of what is done in the Partzilla video? He starts at one end and works his way across. I know the most important thing is to ease the pressure on the cams evenly so how is that done using the proper sequence?

Manual says to loosen the camshaft cap bolts in stages and in a cross pattern, working from the outside in. If I were a certified motorcycle mechanic or even an experienced hobbyist interpreting the manual would be much easier.
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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Outside in a cross pattern. If you don’t loosen or tighten in stages, you will end up snapping the cam cap ( follow the manual)
 

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As you're reassembling, it helps to zip-tie the chain to the cam sprockets. That keeps either from coming off their mark while you secure the crank, guides and tensioner.


What they mean by "stages" is simply to do only several turns at a time before repeating the pattern.
Memory serving, with exception to the small end-caps next to the sprockets, I started with the outside and worked my way in.
Do eeach cam independent of the other.
Do an X pattern with each cam cap
.
The whole ideea is to lower the entire cam, as eveenly as possible; while not pivoting pressure on one part of any particular cam cap.


376916
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As you're reassembling, it helps to zip-tie the chain to the cam sprockets. That keeps either from coming off their mark while you secure the crank, guides and tensioner.


What they mean by "stages" is simply to do only several turns at a time before repeating the pattern.
Memory serving, with exception to the small end-caps next to the sprockets, I started with the outside and worked my way in.
Do eeach cam independent of the other.
Do an X pattern with each cam cap
.
The whole ideea is to lower the entire cam, as eveenly as possible; while not pivoting pressure on one part of any particular cam cap.


View attachment 376916
Perfect, just what I need to know. Thank you.
 
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