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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like some advice from fellow forum members , I've been thinking of buying a torque wrench but I'm not sure which one I would need ( or the range of torque that I should buy ).

Between this two ? Which would you guys pick ? I need to torque my car oil filter to 24Nm which I believe is 212.42 in-lbs. Also I guess at the end of the day it should be something that I can use on my bike as well , like spark plug change.

Duralast/3/8 in

Autocraft 1/2" Drive Click Torque Wrench

Alltrade Tools Kit 68 1/2" Torque Wrench in BMC
 

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Moderator Narcissist
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That Autocraft one would be my choice...wait...it WAS my choice. LOL It's a good wrench. I've taken it to work and calibrated it a few times and it's always in spec (I work for a calibration company...we cal torque wrenches among other things). It's always held a +/-4% indicated value tolerance. Just remember TO ALWAYS LOWER IT TO IT'S LOWEST SETTING WHEN YOU'RE DONE USING IT. Don't screw it all the way back until it stops. If the lowest setting is 10ftlbs then set it there, lock it down, and put it away.

The Duralast one you have listed is an inlbs wrench...that's pretty freakin' small and not worth the money, IMO. Not for a bike's application, at least. And that swing arm wrench is a POS...all swing arm wrenches are simply because you have to keep an eye on the needle to know how much torque you're applying...I hate calibrating those because of bounce. :fact
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome thanks GIJoe007. I also found an online coupon that brought the Autocraft 1/2" Drive Click Torque Wrench purchase down to $26 dollars.

However there is also this Autocraft 1/2" Drive 250 ft.-lb. Torque Wrench That would be around 48 bucks. Should I just save and get the previous Autocraft ?

Thanks for your advice too , I'm a noob when it comes to tools , but I do love to stand and stare at the tools on the Sears tool department. Shiny metals....
 

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Awesome thanks GIJoe007. I also found an online coupon that brought the Autocraft 1/2" Drive Click Torque Wrench purchase down to $26 dollars.

However there is also this Autocraft 1/2" Drive 250 ft.-lb. Torque Wrench That would be around 48 bucks. Should I just save and get the previous Autocraft ?

Thanks for your advice too , I'm a noob when it comes to tools , but I do love to stand and stare at the tools on the Sears tool department. Shiny metals....
LOL @ shiny metals! Yup! But, IMO, the 250ftlb wrench is a little overkill for a bike. If you plan on using it on your bike AND your car then that'd probably be a prudent investment. But I can't imagine anything on a bike that requires over 150ftlb of torque, really. I think the rear axle is probably one of the highest at around 80ftlbs. I could definitely be wrong here, though. I dunno...I guess...yeah, if the 250 is less than $50 that's not a bad price at all considering a fancy schmancy Snap-On wrench of the same range would run you at LEAST $200 (and that's probably way underestimated).

But like I said, man...just remember to lower it back down to its lowest setting when you're done using it. The click type wrenches operate off an internal spring mechanism. If you leave it set really high the spring begins to lose its shape, and it will require adjustment by a calibration facility (like mine! :D). Calibration for a torque wrench can run you as cheap as $35 (that's what we generally charge) or well over $100, and there's no guarantee (depending on how stressed the spring has been...it may give it non-linear characteristics) that it can be adjusted to within spec 100% of the time. The good news is that most calibration facilities won't charge you if they can't get it to pass cal.

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sweet thanks GIJoe. I wanted to the torque to use on my oil filter in my car. Mercedes forums sucks really bad. It takes days beofre someone would even reply you and 60% of the time it's wrong advices. I ended up getting the cheaper torque , as you said I don't see myself using it on much stuff. I can't believe recalibration of a torque wrench could cost so much. Might as well buy a new one if it's 35 and I'm only paying 26 for a brand new torque.
 

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Sweet thanks GIJoe. I wanted to the torque to use on my oil filter in my car. Mercedes forums sucks really bad. It takes days beofre someone would even reply you and 60% of the time it's wrong advices. I ended up getting the cheaper torque , as you said I don't see myself using it on much stuff. I can't believe recalibration of a torque wrench could cost so much. Might as well buy a new one if it's 35 and I'm only paying 26 for a brand new torque.
Good call, really. I mean...around the average garage what the hell are you going to torque down tighter than 150ftlbs?! lol Engine mounts, maybe...I dunno. But yeah, normally the cost of cal wouldn't be that much in comparison to the price of the wrench, but you've got a pretty cheap wrench there. It's a good thing really, that I 'inherited' mine from my dad, took it to work, and found that bish to be damn near perfect! So I know it's a good wrench, regardless of it's cheap price tag.

Be careful, though...don't drop it. :fact
 

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Hey Guy
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Between this two ? Which would you guys pick ? I need to torque my car oil filter to 24Nm which I believe is 212.42 in-lbs. Also I guess at the end of the day it should be something that I can use on my bike as well , like spark plug change.
No a prayer dude. The pan will strip at about 100ft#.
I would re-check this before you start swinging a torque wrench.

Edit: Just saw that that you posted in inch #'s. Most torque wrenches are in ft#'s. inch#'s are rarely used.
 

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slow guy
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That Autocraft one would be my choice...wait...it WAS my choice. LOL It's a good wrench. I've taken it to work and calibrated it a few times and it's always in spec (I work for a calibration company...we cal torque wrenches among other things). It's always held a +/-4% indicated value tolerance. Just remember TO ALWAYS LOWER IT TO IT'S LOWEST SETTING WHEN YOU'RE DONE USING IT. Don't screw it all the way back until it stops. If the lowest setting is 10ftlbs then set it there, lock it down, and put it away.

The Duralast one you have listed is an inlbs wrench...that's pretty freakin' small and not worth the money, IMO. Not for a bike's application, at least. And that swing arm wrench is a POS...all swing arm wrenches are simply because you have to keep an eye on the needle to know how much torque you're applying...I hate calibrating those because of bounce. :fact
Joe where did you hear about setting the torque wrench to the lowest setting when storing it? At work we have a couple morons that leave are big 3/4" torque wrench set at 600+ft lbs all the time. it drives a few of us nuts when we find it that way.
No a prayer dude. The pan will strip at about 100ft#.
I would re-check this before you start swinging a torque wrench.

Edit: Just saw that that you posted in inch #'s. Most torque wrenches are in ft#'s. inch#'s are rarely used.
In lbs are more common then you would think. oil pans. valve covers, most new cars sealing surfaces covers use inch lbs. A good in lb and ft lb torque wrench is a wise investment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No a prayer dude. The pan will strip at about 100ft#.
I would re-check this before you start swinging a torque wrench.

Edit: Just saw that that you posted in inch #'s. Most torque wrenches are in ft#'s. inch#'s are rarely used.
Yeah sorry on the MB forums , everything is posted in inches instead of ft#'s. Drive me nuts trying to convert them each time.


Also , note to self. Keep at the lowest setting , dont drop your shit and keep it safe. Damn that's too much thing to remember. LOL
 

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No a prayer dude. The pan will strip at about 100ft#.
I would re-check this before you start swinging a torque wrench.

Edit: Just saw that that you posted in inch #'s. Most torque wrenches are in ft#'s. inch#'s are rarely used.
LOL I was about to say, "What the hell are you talking about!?" :cheers

Joe where did you hear about setting the torque wrench to the lowest setting when storing it? At work we have a couple morons that leave are big 3/4" torque wrench set at 600+ft lbs all the time. it drives a few of us nuts when we find it that way.

In lbs are more common then you would think. oil pans. valve covers, most new cars sealing surfaces covers use inch lbs. A good in lb and ft lb torque wrench is a wise investment.
I've been calibrating torque wrenches since 1999. I've done THOUSANDS or torque wrench repairs and calibrations (among other things...I've calibrated a LOT of things). For the click type wrenches it's simple protocol to adjust them to their lowest setting (read: lowest setting...not all the way back/out/below it's lowest setting) before storage. I've always gotten wrenches in the lab that are set at various points throughout their range, and they're usually the ones that require adjustment, or simply the ones that have been drop checked. Leaving a 600ftlb wrench set at 500ftlb is just as bad as leaving a 150ftlb wrench at 100ftlb, or a 6inlb wrench at 5inlb basically. It's the spring that gets fatigued over time...that's why you don't want to leave them adjusted up like that. For a few minutes, sure. For the day, sure. But for days or weeks or months sitting on the shelf...no. They've got to be periodically adjusted back down to their lowest setting to relieve the spring.

And about the inlb wrenches, yeah. Like I've said, I've seen them as small as INCH OUNCE wrenches! It just depends on the field you're working in or the type of shop or whatever. :)

Largest wrench I've seen was a 1000ftlb wrench, but I've also calibrated torque multipliers that go up to 20,000ftlbs! :nocontrol
 

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Yeah sorry on the MB forums , everything is posted in inches instead of ft#'s. Drive me nuts trying to convert them each time.


Also , note to self. Keep at the lowest setting , dont drop your shit and keep it safe. Damn that's too much thing to remember. LOL
Easy conversion:

ftlb to inlb = multiply by 12

inlb to ftlb = divide by 12

It's when you start converting to crazy stuff like the SI unit of N (newtons) and units like that is when it gets a bit confusing.
 

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slow guy
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I've been calibrating torque wrenches since 1999. I've done THOUSANDS or torque wrench repairs and calibrations (among other things...I've calibrated a LOT of things). For the click type wrenches it's simple protocol to adjust them to their lowest setting (read: lowest setting...not all the way back/out/below it's lowest setting) before storage. I've always gotten wrenches in the lab that are set at various points throughout their range, and they're usually the ones that require adjustment, or simply the ones that have been drop checked. Leaving a 600ftlb wrench set at 500ftlb is just as bad as leaving a 150ftlb wrench at 100ftlb, or a 6inlb wrench at 5inlb basically. It's the spring that gets fatigued over time...that's why you don't want to leave them adjusted up like that. For a few minutes, sure. For the day, sure. But for days or weeks or months sitting on the shelf...no. They've got to be periodically adjusted back down to their lowest setting to relieve the spring.

And about the inlb wrenches, yeah. Like I've said, I've seen them as small as INCH OUNCE wrenches! It just depends on the field you're working in or the type of shop or whatever. :)

Largest wrench I've seen was a 1000ftlb wrench, but I've also calibrated torque multipliers that go up to 20,000ftlbs! :nocontrol
Yeah that's what we all have been saying about fatiguing the spring. Just good to hear it from someone that calibrates them:cheers

My prior job we had a 2" drive enerpac air over hydraulic torque wrench, the most we did was 4-5000 ft lbs but it could go up to 10,000 If I remember correctly.
 

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AFM #327
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I've been calibrating torque wrenches since 1999. I've done THOUSANDS or torque wrench repairs and calibrations (among other things...I've calibrated a LOT of things). For the click type wrenches it's simple protocol to adjust them to their lowest setting (read: lowest setting...not all the way back/out/below it's lowest setting) before storage. I've always gotten wrenches in the lab that are set at various points throughout their range, and they're usually the ones that require adjustment, or simply the ones that have been drop checked. Leaving a 600ftlb wrench set at 500ftlb is just as bad as leaving a 150ftlb wrench at 100ftlb, or a 6inlb wrench at 5inlb basically. It's the spring that gets fatigued over time...that's why you don't want to leave them adjusted up like that. For a few minutes, sure. For the day, sure. But for days or weeks or months sitting on the shelf...no. They've got to be periodically adjusted back down to their lowest setting to relieve the spring.

And about the inlb wrenches, yeah. Like I've said, I've seen them as small as INCH OUNCE wrenches! It just depends on the field you're working in or the type of shop or whatever. :)

Largest wrench I've seen was a 1000ftlb wrench, but I've also calibrated torque multipliers that go up to 20,000ftlbs! :nocontrol

so what happens when you turn it below the lowest setting? I understand that keeping the spring loaded for a long time may tend it to have fatigue or creep, how about below the lowest setting? Too much extension?
 

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so what happens when you turn it below the lowest setting? I understand that keeping the spring loaded for a long time may tend it to have fatigue or creep, how about below the lowest setting? Too much extension?
A couple of things could happen. I could stress the spring in the opposite direction, depending on how far/low the adjustment will allow or it could simply come apart! :laugh Some wrenches will do that...you'll just be a'screwin' away, talkin' to whoever and *plink* "Oh....dammit..." Then you're playing Legos for the next hour, and a nice fancy game of Find the Contact Lens on the ground looking for the internal BBs that fell out! :laugh
 

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Joe my torque wrench is 10nm-80nm. So just to clarify, after use I should set it back to 10nm? Damn I've had it on 0 lol.
 

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I would like some advice from fellow forum members , I've been thinking of buying a torque wrench but I'm not sure which one I would need ( or the range of torque that I should buy ).

Between this two ? Which would you guys pick ? I need to torque my car oil filter to 24Nm which I believe is 212.42 in-lbs. Also I guess at the end of the day it should be something that I can use on my bike as well , like spark plug change.

Duralast/3/8 in

Autocraft 1/2" Drive Click Torque Wrench

Alltrade Tools Kit 68 1/2" Torque Wrench in BMC
I think you may be looking into this a little much.

I have worked in the automotive field professionally for over 6 years and only the important things get torqued such as a head bolt, crank bolt, main bearing bolt, wheel lug nut, or oil pan bolts/nuts that use a rubber style gasket...you get the idea. Leave torque to the important things.

And yes Joe is right, always set it to the lowest setting....not zero. I have always reset mine at the end of the day.
 

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Hey Guy
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I think you may be looking into this a little much.

I have worked in the automotive field professionally for over 6 years and only the important things get torqued such as a head bolt, crank bolt, main bearing bolt, wheel lug nut, or oil pan bolts/nuts that use a rubber style gasket...you get the idea. Leave torque to the important things.
Exactly. I rarely bust out the torque wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I think you may be looking into this a little much.

I have worked in the automotive field professionally for over 6 years and only the important things get torqued such as a head bolt, crank bolt, main bearing bolt, wheel lug nut, or oil pan bolts/nuts that use a rubber style gasket...you get the idea. Leave torque to the important things.

And yes Joe is right, always set it to the lowest setting....not zero. I have always reset mine at the end of the day.
I am definitely paranoid , no doubt about that. I just spend over 40 bucks , the torque and the 1/2 to 3/8 adapter just so I can make sure my oil filter is tighten to 24Nm. LOL. I'm always like this when it's the first time doing something. The first time I changed oil on my six it took me 4 hours plus. Now it's about 20 minutes or so.
 
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