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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi people.

I have been riding for about 5 years or so now. During that time i have had GSXR's and Yamahas and have really enjoyed thrashing bikes. I had an 08 R1 and used to rip into it and had heaps of confidence in the bike and the road.

In Feb this year i highsided from my 09 FZ1 N and ended up with an 09 R6. I didnt enjoy the sports touring riding feeling of the FZ1 and was planning on selling it for an R6.

I have only done about 2000kms on the R6 and most of that was done on the annual Phillip island pilgramage. On the ride we rode in snow, ice, fog, rain and sun. However even after surviving that, i still have zero confidence compared to pre-crash!

Does anyone have any suggestions for how to overcome this 'fear' of crashing again?? I find myself thinking of the road surface, looking for potholes, cracks in the road, or other hazards that might throw me off.

If you have crashed, how did you overcome this? Surely i am not the only one who has been slowed down because of an accident.

cheers Matt
 

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off roadin' GARDEN SLAYA!
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904 Posts
Seat time. I was hit by car earlier this year and it has definitely slowed me down but everyday I ride I get a bit more confidence back.
 

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R6'ers B4 Gixxers
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367 Posts
I agree! You've got to get back on the bike and ride. I dropped my 650R earlier this year on a low speed corner involving gravel. I was pretty damn scared to ride again, but I went ahead and picked up my 6 and got back on the road.

My accident sure as hell made me more aware of my surroundings and that will never change. I too pay more attention to the road condition, but I think that is just a natural reaction for anyone.

Bottom line, you got to get back on that horse and ride again! The confidence will come back!
 

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NCSportbikes.com
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701 Posts
After I crashed this spring (75mph highside into a ditch) I took a few weeks off from riding. Then I took the bike back out to where I wrecked and rode the corner like 20 times back to back until I was hitting it faster than the speed I crashed at and that gave me my confidence back and I actually got faster after my crash and I did that. As soon as I made that corner my bitch I was back to not worrying about crashing anymore and just riding again and if I crash I crash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah your all dead right and it will take time on the bike, and Ridebmxnc, thats a good idea. I might go back to where i binned it and conquer it!!! coming off at 75mph is nuts!

I just wish my mind wouldnt keep bringing it up on every turn or every time i get a bit of speed up....
 

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Est. 10/21/93
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639 Posts
After I crashed this spring (75mph highside into a ditch) I took a few weeks off from riding. Then I took the bike back out to where I wrecked and rode the corner like 20 times back to back until I was hitting it faster than the speed I crashed at and that gave me my confidence back and I actually got faster after my crash and I did that. As soon as I made that corner my bitch I was back to not worrying about crashing anymore and just riding again and if I crash I crash.
:bow
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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6,380 Posts
It has always helped me to evaluate the crash. Figure out what I did wrong and how to avoid the situation or react better. Forget about outside conditions that acted on you (ie. I lost grip, my tires were bad, I musta slipped on oil) All of these can be overcome by correct reactions. 95% of the time WE are the variable that could have avoided the crash. Even getting hit by another vehicle can, MOST of the time, have been avoided by better observance skills.

I crashed last week and what bothers me more than anything is that I have no recollection of the crash so I cannot evaluate it like I want to. I still have gone back to the site and talked to the emergency responders and tried to piece it together. Still, I am left with two options: 1. I swerved to avoid something (dog, car, etc.) that was in my lane, or 2. My blood sugar dropped and I blacked out (which I think is unlikely because I had checked my sugar level 1/2 hour before and had eaten then) But with diabetes, it is always a possibility.

But, as has been mentioned, seat time is your best friend. I would also recommend getting a copy (or DVD) of Kieth Code's "Twist of the Wrist II". Work on avoiding survival responses and implementing the techniques in his book. It takes you back to the basics of sportbike riding, and is one of the best out there, by far!!
 

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Sticky-side-down.
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465 Posts
Try to reconcile with the events which occurred that were responsible for that crash and learn from any mistakes in judgment or riding conditions that could have increased the probability of the high side.

Focus on what you enjoy about riding, maybe put in some track time.
 

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Oorah!
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1,140 Posts
You don't over come the fear, you live everyday knowing that it can happen again. All you can do is drive the best that you can and thank god everyday that you don't have a wreck.

I guess what i'm trying to say is..GROW A PAIR.
 

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Stunt Rider
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7,982 Posts
You've got to accept the fact that you could/will die riding your bike. Once, you accept that, you can enjoy the ride.

I've already assumed I'm going to end up in the hospital from a major riding accident. I can relax and enjoy the outcome now.

I recently broke my collar bone from a crash. It was inevitable.
 

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Premium Member
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1,478 Posts
keep riding.
I haven't crashed recently but I don't ride near as much as I used to so I am nowhere near the rider I used to be. I did a track day on Tuesday and every session I went out I felt better and road faster. Just goes to emphasize the point that the more you ride the better and more comfortable you get.
 
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