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This is how to lower the bike using the dogbone on this website: http://www.tobefast.com/r6.htm


First, you need to take the weight off of the swingarm. I did this by putting a broomstick with something wrapped around it (so it doesn't scratch) under the seat so that it is pushing up on the battery box. Then I rested the stick on two chairs on opposite sides of the bike.


Now with the rear tire off of the ground, there is no pressure on the rear spring, so you can take the old dogbone out. If you don't know what the dogbone is, maybe you shouldn't try this. When you take the dogbone out, the tire and swingarm will go to the gound (it is still hooked up to the frame though).


After you have the dogbone out, you are going to have to put the bearings that are in it into the new lowering link. You can do this safely, and easily if you have a vise.


Using two sockets, position the dogbone in the vise so that there is a socket that is bigger than the bearing on one side of the bearing to be removed, and a socket that is ever so slightly smaller than the bearing on the other side of the bearing.


With the dogbone and sockets in the vise, start cranking down on it, and the smaller socket will push the bearing out of the dogbone, and into the bigger socket. Do this to both bearings. These are needle bearings, so don't drop them, or you are screwed.


When you have both bearings out, you can install them into the new lowering link. Use a little bit of grease in the new one, so that the bearings will slide in easier.

Using the top of the vise, you can lightly tap the bearings in with a hammer (LIGHTLY!!), then you can press them into place using the same method as taking them out.


It should be noted that when you install it on the bike, the nuts on the lowering link have to be toward the rear of the bike. Put the forward end on first, slide the mounting bolt through, but don't tighten yet.


Then lift the tire and swingarm up until you can slide the bolt through the rear of the link. Now you can tighten both bolts down to specs. (I don't have the specs, I just tightened it down enough to be sure that it wasn't going to come back off, probably around 80ft. pounds, or so.)


Then you can dop the bike down from its perch, and sit on it, and make adjustments to the link as needed to obtain the ride height you want. After you have it where you want it, tighten both nuts down. I highly recommend using lock-tight, as engine vibrations tend to make things come undone.


You REALLY should lower the front, too,. To do this, you just loosen all the triple tree-to-fork bolts, and slide the forks evenly up the tree. A little goes a long way in this dept. I lowerd mine 1 1/2". (Be sure to support the front of the bike, not the front tire, before loosening it all up).


People say that lowering a bike screws up the bike's suspension, and makes it handle like crap. This is not true if you do it right. If the front and rear are lowered evenly, the bike will handle just like it was designed, if not better.

Now that I have lowered mine, it handles better than it did stock in the turns. The center of gravity is lower, and you can really get down in the turns with confidence.


One more thing I should mention is that after you lower it, the stock height of the kickstand isn't going to work anymore. You can either cut it in the middle somewhere, and weld it back together, or you can blow $160 on an adjustable kick stand (rip-off). I cut an inch out of mine.
Good luck, and if there are anymore questions, or if you want me to clarify something, let me know.
:drink
 

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Hey miraclegrau, I edited your post to space it out into paragraphs. I did this to make it a little easier to read.

Good explanation. I like the way you took the weight off the suspension too. Need more detail on how you took the weight off the front end though. I would recomend a triple tree stand. I have also seen it done with cherry picker ( what you pull car motors out with).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To be honest, I didn't support the front, I just loosened the clamps, not enough so that it would fall, and tapped the front down with a rubber mallet. :)
But some sort of support would probably be easier. Good lookin' out.

Char
 

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I AGREE.. GREAT EXPLANATION.... ALTHOUGH, WHAT ARE GOOD SUSPENSION SETTINGS WITH APPROXIMATELY A 2-3 INCH DROP???

:flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame :flame
 

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man if i only had a use for such a great explanation. well i guess if i ever meet someone that wants to lower their bike i now know. thanks grau

you da woman :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
aw shucks

aw shucks. Most of that info is from my guy, but I'm learning, and I appreciate the compliments---who doesn't?! :mrgreen:
 

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Can I get a picture of these steps if anyone can do it.

First, you need to take the weight off of the swingarm. I did this by putting a broomstick with something wrapped around it (so it doesn't scratch) under the seat so that it is pushing up on the battery box. Then I rested the stick on two chairs on opposite sides of the bike.
It should be noted that when you install it on the bike, the nuts on the lowering link have to be toward the rear of the bike. Put the forward end on first, slide the mounting bolt through, but don't tighten yet.
also, since I don't have the part yet, what do you have to do to the link to set the height? Do I just try and turn it with it on the bike as the guide seemed to point to?
 

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skates said:
Can I get a picture of these steps if anyone can do it.

First, you need to take the weight off of the swingarm. I did this by putting a broomstick with something wrapped around it (so it doesn't scratch) under the seat so that it is pushing up on the battery box. Then I rested the stick on two chairs on opposite sides of the bike.
It should be noted that when you install it on the bike, the nuts on the lowering link have to be toward the rear of the bike. Put the forward end on first, slide the mounting bolt through, but don't tighten yet.
also, since I don't have the part yet, what do you have to do to the link to set the height? Do I just try and turn it with it on the bike as the guide seemed to point to?


Just buy a motorcycle jack and use that to lift the bike. Its much easier and more stable. I bought a jack for about $40 at PepBoys (autoparts store) and got tie downs to secure the bike to the jack.

You adjust the link just by turning it. The longer you make the link, the lower you'll make the bike in the rear. I ended up lengthening my link about an inch longer than the stock one.
 

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<ZZZZZZZZ#``` lets smoke
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So how do you know the measurment? How can you tell if it's 1 or 2 inch drop?

gtracerh said:
skates said:
Can I get a picture of these steps if anyone can do it.

First, you need to take the weight off of the swingarm. I did this by putting a broomstick with something wrapped around it (so it doesn't scratch) under the seat so that it is pushing up on the battery box. Then I rested the stick on two chairs on opposite sides of the bike.
It should be noted that when you install it on the bike, the nuts on the lowering link have to be toward the rear of the bike. Put the forward end on first, slide the mounting bolt through, but don't tighten yet.
also, since I don't have the part yet, what do you have to do to the link to set the height? Do I just try and turn it with it on the bike as the guide seemed to point to?


Just buy a motorcycle jack and use that to lift the bike. Its much easier and more stable. I bought a jack for about $40 at PepBoys (autoparts store) and got tie downs to secure the bike to the jack.

You adjust the link just by turning it. The longer you make the link, the lower you'll make the bike in the rear. I ended up lengthening my link about an inch longer than the stock one.
 

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First, you put the bike up on your bikes stands. measure from the ground to a point on the body that you can remember. Then, we used tie-downs and hung it from the rafters in the garage. install the lowering link and adjust it out to where you want it and then put it back down on the stands. measure again from the ground to that same point on the body. that will tell you the difference and how much to lower the front.
 

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a tool like this angle locator will help in the adjustment of the forks. getting close to the stock 24*. or any similar tool should help. this is the same tool i used to set my set. its easier if the shop floor/work area is level. click on pic.

 

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Also, as for the kickstand. It doesn't have to to be hacked or replaced. if you grind down the the nub at the top where it hits the stop, it sits properly.
 

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little_red_rider said:
Also, as for the kickstand. It doesn't have to to be hacked or replaced. if you grind down the the nub at the top where it hits the stop, it sits properly.
Sorry please elaborate. I don't understand. :roll:
 

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Here is a pic of my kickstand just before it hits the stop. I used a mototool to grind off the nub so that the stand would go farther forward.
see pic:

 

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Discussion Starter #18
miraclegrau said:
This is how to lower the bike using the dogbone on this website: http://www.tobefast.com/r6.htm


First, you need to take the weight off of the swingarm. I did this by putting a broomstick with something wrapped around it (so it doesn't scratch) under the seat so that it is pushing up on the battery box. Then I rested the stick on two chairs on opposite sides of the bike.


Now with the rear tire off of the ground, there is no pressure on the rear spring, so you can take the old dogbone out. If you don't know what the dogbone is, maybe you shouldn't try this. When you take the dogbone out, the tire and swingarm will go to the gound (it is still hooked up to the frame though).


After you have the dogbone out, you are going to have to put the bearings that are in it into the new lowering link. You can do this safely, and easily if you have a vise.


Using two sockets, position the dogbone in the vise so that there is a socket that is bigger than the bearing on one side of the bearing to be removed, and a socket that is ever so slightly smaller than the bearing on the other side of the bearing.


With the dogbone and sockets in the vise, start cranking down on it, and the smaller socket will push the bearing out of the dogbone, and into the bigger socket. Do this to both bearings. These are needle bearings, so don't drop them, or you are screwed.


When you have both bearings out, you can install them into the new lowering link. Use a little bit of grease in the new one, so that the bearings will slide in easier.

Using the top of the vise, you can lightly tap the bearings in with a hammer (LIGHTLY!!), then you can press them into place using the same method as taking them out.


It should be noted that when you install it on the bike, the nuts on the lowering link have to be toward the rear of the bike. Put the forward end on first, slide the mounting bolt through, but don't tighten yet.


Then lift the tire and swingarm up until you can slide the bolt through the rear of the link. Now you can tighten both bolts down to specs. (I don't have the specs, I just tightened it down enough to be sure that it wasn't going to come back off, probably around 80ft. pounds, or so.)


Then you can dop the bike down from its perch, and sit on it, and make adjustments to the link as needed to obtain the ride height you want. After you have it where you want it, tighten both nuts down. I highly recommend using lock-tight, as engine vibrations tend to make things come undone.


You REALLY should lower the front, too,. To do this, you just loosen all the triple tree-to-fork bolts, and slide the forks evenly up the tree. A little goes a long way in this dept. I lowerd mine 1 1/2". (Be sure to support the front of the bike, not the front tire, before loosening it all up).


People say that lowering a bike screws up the bike's suspension, and makes it handle like crap. This is not true if you do it right. If the front and rear are lowered evenly, the bike will handle just like it was designed, if not better.

Now that I have lowered mine, it handles better than it did stock in the turns. The center of gravity is lower, and you can really get down in the turns with confidence.


One more thing I should mention is that after you lower it, the stock height of the kickstand isn't going to work anymore. You can either cut it in the middle somewhere, and weld it back together, or you can blow $160 on an adjustable kick stand (rip-off). I cut an inch out of mine.
Good luck, and if there are anymore questions, or if you want me to clarify something, let me know.
:drink

FOR ALL U MUGS THAT MISSED THIS---(keep getting questions on lowering) :drink
 

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Lowering a bike makes it have a lower center of gravity..the bike will seem lighter to throw around corners...i prefer it this way...although u gotta choose ur parking space wisely..or cut the kick stand....


Don't let people mock you about lowering ur bike...i own 2 bikes..one lowered...and one not..the lowered one was easier to throw around corners...im not a pure racer so i don't drag my knees on the ground...you won't feel any difference...i felt it was better for cornering..
 

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little_red_rider said:
Here is a pic of my kickstand just before it hits the stop. I used a mototool to grind off the nub so that the stand would go farther forward.
see pic:


Damn, wash the bike!!! it's hard to see wtf you did with all that dirt on it !!!
 
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