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This mothod is done the same way, but there is more detail of why:



SETTING STATIC SAG (THE RULE OF THUMB METHOD)

Assuming you now have the proper spring rate for your weight, you can now set your static sag. This method of checking static sag is not the definitive end all to suspension set-up but it will get you in the ballpark. Individual bikes will vary. For example, some bikes may work well with 25mm of sag in the front forks while others work better with 30mm of sag. This rule of thumb method has been the racer's basic set-up guide for over a decade and is still used today.

HOW TO:

Measuring the static sag of your bike is done with you on it. This will take several people to do. One person to hold the bike steady, the other to do the measuring. And then, there is you sitting on the bike with your feet on the pegs.

REAR: First, with you off the bike, lift up on the back of your bike or subframe to top out the suspension then measure from the ground to a chosen point on the tailsection or subframe like a metal bracket. (Make sure it's something solid. The plastic tailsection can flex and you will get inaccurate measurements.) Write down this measurement. Next, with someone stabilizing the front end, sit on the bike, feet on the pegs, kickstand up. Now, have the other person measure the height from the ground to the same spot on the tail section. The proper static sag with you on the bike shoud be 1 to 1 1/4 inch. If your spring is over or under-preloaded, it will make your bike perform poorly in numerous ways. If it sags too much or is topped-out, adjust it accordingly to the prescribed measurement.

FRONT: Place a zip-tie around the slider next to the dust seal. With someone stabilizing the rear end, sit on the bike, feet on the pegs and kickstand up. Let the bike sag naturally. Don't bounce up and down. That will cause the zip tie to slide further and give you an inaccurate measurement. Next, get off the bike, lift up on the bars (handlebars or clip-ons) and top out the forks. Measure the distance from the inside of the zip-tie to the dust seal. It should be about 1 to 1 1/4 inch. Adjust the pre-load accordingly to the prescribed measurement. This is your initial set-up.
 

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static sag or free sag as some call it is what the bike own weight (without rider) compress the springs...

rider sag is with the rider on the bike.

Just wanted to chime in that the termonoligy in that post is a bit off... also the procedure method mentions nothing about stiction...
 

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wow this thing sounds very confusing.
 

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i'm from sacramento/ elk grove area in california...is there a shop around here where i can just take the bike in to adjust sag for my height and weight? i'm 5'10"/ 220 lbs.
 

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Iwakuni Binjo Bomber
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Re: Does an 06 r1 stablizer fit on a 06 r6

Don't think so, 'cause the 06 R1 has a stock mount damper & the 06 R6 I think is a top mount....I guess it can depend on the brand damper too.
R6 has to use a GRPv4, though I prefer a piston system for it's softer play.
Checkout my install of the HyperPro.
http://ApexRidersDFWmc.com

I love my R6, until 2010, when I will get the new R1.
 

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can anyone tell me the recommended sag for the front? I set mine to about 29mm but it took a hell of a lot of tightening the preload.. wondering if this sounds about right
 

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This mothod is done the same way, but there is more detail of why:



SETTING STATIC SAG (THE RULE OF THUMB METHOD)

Assuming you now have the proper spring rate for your weight, you can now set your static sag.

How do I get the proper spring rate? Seems like that is step one and you just went to step 2. Is there some kind of chart for my weight that I can look at and see what the spring rate should be set to on my particular bike??

:dunce:
 

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don't forget to duck ;)

dave knows his stuff. watch some of the other seminars from OTT, particularly the tire segment especially. if you ride track.
 

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For those wanting to know about suspension tuning I highly Reccomend Dave Moss' DVD Boxset which can be found on Catalyst Reaction's Suspension Tuning...just google "Dave Moss". One thing to keep in mind, especially for those of us who are track day fanatics, is that suspension tuning is a constant evolution throughout the day. Your tires will be a direct indicator of certain adjustments that will have to be made to dial rebound and compression along with preload. As some have said already, it's imparative that sag be determined first for the geometry of dialing in hydrolics will do you zero justice until this is right. Dave breaks it down as he works one on one with track day riders in his videos so that you get a good feel for how your bike is handling, how to read tire wear...ie, Hot Tears, Cold Tears, Rebound issues and so on, so that the adjustments you begin to make are translated into better cornering and just an overall safer ride. Good luck to all and dress for the slide not the ride.
 

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