Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 82 Posts

·
the R demands respect....
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Protection: Wear a helmet, jacket, jeans, and gloves if you don’t want to get messed up.


Before riding wheelies on a bike
If you have access to a quad, a dirt bike, or a fiddy, learn wheelies on that first. What you learn about throttle control and the balance point will help you in learning to ride a wheelie on a bike. If you’re ready to learn on a bike then: 1. Make sure the rear brake works and adjust the lever to a comfortable height. 2. There should be 1in. of play in chain slack. A chain too tight or too loose will wear out the chain and sprockets faster than normal. 3. Make sure there are no cracks in the foot pegs, and make sure all of the bolts are tight.

Speed and riding position for learning wheelies
I recommend that beginners learn wheelies if first gear. It is easier to launch the wheelie in first gear, and there is more engine breaking in first gear. This means that you can ride a wheelie higher without the danger of looping it. It also hurts much less and breaks less stuff when you crash in first gear. For that reason i don't think it is a good idea to do highspeed wheelies until using the brake is second nature. It is also much easier to go from riding out first gear wheelies to second gear wheelies than vice versa. The only downfall to learning wheelies in first vs. seconds is that the wheelie won’t be as smooth. The throttle will feel much more sensitive. I think fifteen mph is a good speed to launch wheelies while learning; any slower and the wheelie may feel unstable to a beginner. I also recommend learning wheelies standing up with the left foot on the passenger peg, and the right foot on the front peg, covering the brake. While it may feel awkward at first to wheelie while standing, it will be easier after you get used to that part. Most people think it is easier to balance and control a wheelie standing up vs. sitting down. It is also easier to launch the wheelie from standing up.

Why clutching wheelies is the best method for launching wheelies
Clutching is by far the best way to get wheelies up, regardless of whether the bike has enough power to power it up. While it does wear out clutch plates a little faster than normal, the difference is not significant. I also have never read about any major problems as the result of the extra tension on the drive train. There are many advantages to clutching wheelies vs. powering wheelies. 1. It allows you to wheelie bikes that don’t have enough power to power it up. 2. You can wheelie at lower rpm’s, and therefore slower speeds. This allows beginners to keep a wheelie up longer, with out being at the balance point. 3. The launch is more predictable. When powering a wheelie up, the front end comes up relatively slow. Then when the front end is about 3 feet off the ground, the front end jumps up very fast under full throttle, making for a scary and unpredictable launch. When clutching up wheelies right, the front jumps up close to the balance point. From there you just play with the throttle to fine adjust the height. After a little practice, clutching becomes very predictable and not frightening at all. 4. All of the pros that I know of clutch every wheelie. You want to be like them don’t you?

How to clutch wheelies
There are a couple different methods for clutching wheelies. I prefer the second method.
Method 1: First accelerate with the clutch engaged. Then, with the throttle still opened, pull in the clutch with one finger, to the point where the clutch disengages. With the engine still under throttle, quickly let the clutch back out as the tach is rising.
Method 2: Close the throttle, and then pull the clutch in all the way, with one finger. Then twist the throttle and dump the clutch.
When learning to clutch, only rev up the engine a little bit at first before letting out the clutch. This will give you the feel for clutching. Then gradually increase the rpm’s before dumping the clutch, until the front end jumps up close to the balance point. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point. If it comes up too far, gently push the rear brake to bring the bike back forward. When clutching second and third gear wheelies, the bike may need extra help, depending on what bike it is. If clutching alone doesn’t get the wheelie up, then bounce at the same time. This is done by pushing down on the bike (with your arms and legs) at the same time you open the throttle, and then leaning back slightly when dropping the clutch. I is not a good idea to pull on the bars. Pulling up on the bars may cause the wheelie to come up funny and wobble.


Shifting gears
I don’t recommend shifting gears during a wheelie unless you are good at wheelies, and are able to use the clutch in the process. Otherwise, shifting during wheelies is hard on the transmission. It is also hard on the fork seals if you miss a shift. My advice is to learn to ride wheelies at a constant speed. Then there will be no need to shift.


How to set a wheelie down
When bringing down a wheelie, stay on the throttle until the front end is safely on the ground. If it is necessary to quickly bring down the front end, then close the throttle at first. Then as the front is coming down, open the throttle. In that way you will have a soft landing.

Step by step procedure to launch a wheelie for a beginner
1. Drop the tire pressure to about 15-20psi
2. Put the bike into first gear
3. Go about 15mph
4. Pull in the clutch
5. Rev up the engine a little and drop the clutch
6. Repeat step 5, increasing the rpm’s, until the front end comes up close to the balance point.
7. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point.
8. Cover the rear brake.
9. Stay on the throttle as it comes back down.

Balancing the wheelie from front to back
Balancing front to back is controlled by using the throttle and rear brake. It is a good idea to learn this on a quad, fiddy, or dirtbike first. If the wheelie is in front of the balance point, you must increase your speed to remain at that position. To get the wheelie back to the balance point, you must compensate with more throttle. This is the same, only in reverse, when the wheelie is behind the balance point. When behind the balance point, you must use the engine breaking/ rear brake to bring it forward to the balance point. The balance point is the position of the bike in which it neither has to speed up or slow down to remain at the same position. The height of the balance point is affected mainly by the speed of the wheelie. The faster the wheelie is, the lower the balance point. The balance point is also slightly affected by the weight distribution of the bike and the position of the rider. The object of riding a balanced wheelie is to keep the bike as close as possible to the balance point. This is done by rolling on and off the throttle, and pushing the brake if needed. With practice comes the ability to ride a smooth wheelie with out playing with the throttle/brake much.

Balancing the wheelie from side to side
Balancing sided to side is done by adjusting your body position. It is a good idea to learn this on a dirtbike, bicycle, or fiddy first. When riding wheelies over about 20mph, the bike will balance itself for the most part. It is the slow wheelies that you have to consciously balance side to side. The principle is pretty simple. Quickly lean the same direction as the bike is falling. For example, if the bike is starting to fall to the left, you would quickly lean to the left. This movement would twist the bike towards the left, thereby correcting it.

Preventing / stopping wheelie wobbles
From my experience, I think that high speed wheelie wobbles can be caused by having a squared off rear tire, not being smooth on the throttle, and/or making quick movements. Slow speed wobbles seems to be caused by high rear tire pressure, and/or not keeping the wheelie balanced from side to side.

Steering wheelies
To steer wheelies good, you need to either be at the balance point, or behind the balance point. To steer wheelies which are over about 20mph, you simply slowly lean in the direction you want to turn. However, to turn slow wheelies, you must first make the bike lean in the direction which you want to turn. For example, if you want to turn to the right, first, slowly lean to the right. Then quickly lean a little to the left / twist the handlebars a little to the left. This will cause the bike to start to fall to the right. Then, instead of completely correcting the lean, you keep the bike leaning at that angle. This will cause the bike to turn to the right.

Using the rear brake: Slowing wheelies down / 12s
Wheelies are slowed down by riding the wheelie behind the balance point. This is one of the hardest parts of learning to wheelie, not because of skill, but because of the balls required. To learn how to use the rear brake, you basically need to grow some balls, bring the wheelie up behind the balance point, and tap the brake. Soon this process will become second nature. To slow a wheelie down, you must give the bike enough throttle to get the wheelie behind the balance point. Now if you get scared and push the rear break hard at this point, it will quickly bring the wheelie forward without slowing it down much. To slow it down, you must keep it behind the balance point by gently riding the brake. To 12, you just do the same thing, only you get off the rear break enough to allow the bike to lean back on the tail. Unless you plan on parking a 12, make sure you get back on the brake before the wheelie slows down enough to stall the engine.

Riding slow wheelies
After you get good at slowing down wheelies, then you should be able to ride slow wheelies out. First of all, turn up your idle. I do slow stuff with the idle at 3.5k rpm’s. The high idle allows you to ride slow wheelies much smoother. Be careful, however, when first turning up the idle, because you will have to use the rear brake, when going slow, to keep from looping. When riding slow wheelies with the idle high, with some practice, you should be able to ride the wheelie by using the brake, and only blipping the throttle if the wheelie starts to come down.

Once you have learned all of this, all of the wheelie variations will pretty much be self explanatory.
 

·
the R demands respect....
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
lmao... thats the same shit i thought. peeps told me there was a stunt section, so this is the only place i go on here.
 

·
riot
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
the_student said:
lmao... thats the same shit i thought. peeps told me there was a stunt section, so this is the only place i go on here.
yeah haha ill start being on here more often, just i dont have an r6 anymore so dont hate to much
 

·
Bluer Than You!
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
hmmm... i've been learning to power mine up... 1st gear 12k rpms... roll off and hit the throttle hard... been hopping a lot... had a couple come up pretty high but went right back down
 

·
Ride and Die
Joined
·
9 Posts
nice write up....im a noob with an 01.....finally got the balls to go try poppin wheelies....will let you guys know when im up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Stuntin is my passion now! I used to love the twisties but now its all about the Stunts.. as for the rolling Endos.. i got those down pretty good.. Just scoot up to the tank and squeeze the front brake until the back end is up to your desired height then let out on the brake a little to ride it farther.. or at least thats what I do..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
hmmm... i've been learning to power mine up... 1st gear 12k rpms... roll off and hit the throttle hard... been hopping a lot... had a couple come up pretty high but went right back down

you have to rev it to 12k to power up 1st? or do you just like it like that.
i can power up my 04 at 6.5k-7k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
my 08 r6s will power up in first at 7ish, and second round 10...thats all i have for wheelies..
the burn-out----------hold front brake, stand up as far as u can forward, put bike in first, rev to about 2 or 3 at first and slip out the clutch till the tire spins then give it more gas while still holding the front brake tight..
you can also shift gears if you want to or begin to do rolling burn outs...
they are so fun but just a waste of money....:cheers
 

·
R6
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
i been powering them up in first. i want to learn to clutch them i tried once and almost flew off the back of the bike had me scared shitless. any help?
 

·
Bluer Than You!
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
if your in 1st, thats not the best gear... try second gear. 35 mph. bounce and clutch should come up no problem and shouldnt be too violent. here's me 3rd gear bounce clutch. this has been awhile, I can ride em higher now and longer. Just need to get someone out to take pics...





 

·
My R6 owes me money!
Joined
·
587 Posts
Stoppies:

find a nice flat piece of pavement, get going about 25-35mph, and work on grabbing a hand full of front brake when your coming to a stop, consistanly increase the front brake pressure till you feel the rear tire come off the ground

Continue this till you get your desired effect

Remember, if you think your gonna dink it and go over, let off the freakin break!!!
 

·
Chicks dig me
Joined
·
27 Posts
Originally Posted by tjroux
Remember, if you think your gonna dink it and go over, let off the freakin break!!!
Funny that. An instinctive panic reaction that I've learned from riding in heavy traffic every day is grab a fist full of front break.

So I'm practising little wheelies (still reserved after I flipped it a while ago) and I'm just not giving it enough revs and I'm just not dropping the clutch fast enough. I'm sort of lifting it a foot and closing the throttle. So I get irritated with myself and drop the clutch at red line..... almost flipped. I go such a fright I floored the back break and grabbed the front.... ouch. She came down hard with front breaks locked. I almost lost a nut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
ok so what tires and tire pressure is everyone using? i know this has to make a big difference?
 

·
blue is baller
Joined
·
79 Posts
ok so what tires and tire pressure is everyone using? i know this has to make a big difference?
20 is usually what i keep them at , unless im trying to do slower wheelies and keep them at bp , i go with about 15 , but im no where near pro, so i would say just experiment with what u find works the best with her methods
 
1 - 20 of 82 Posts
Top