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Hi Guys i have a question. Sorry if it sounds dumb. Please i'd like real answers or people that actually knows what they are talking about, and are not guessing. I've seen incidents at the track where people fall of they bike and antifreeze leaks at the track, and you know, it takes time to clean the spill up. So i'm trying to avoid that by doing my part in case i have an incident and my bike spills antifreeze. i would hate to ruin peoples day like some people have ruined mine in some instances. I want to change my regular antifreeze to engine ice or water wetter. I'm leaning towards the engine ice since it has antifreeze on it, and i don't have to take it out of the bike before winter comes. But my real question is. why is it a good idea to change it? Is it because both of those products in case of a spill at the track, they don't make the surface of the track slippery like regular antifreeze?
 

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Hi Guys i have a question. Sorry if it sounds dumb. Please i'd like real answers or people that actually knows what they are talking about, and are not guessing. I've seen incidents at the track where people fall of they bike and antifreeze leaks at the track, and you know, it takes time to clean the spill up. So i'm trying to avoid that by doing my part in case i have an incident and my bike spills antifreeze. i would hate to ruin peoples day like some people have ruined mine in some instances. I want to change my regular antifreeze to engine ice or water wetter. I'm leaning towards the engine ice since it has antifreeze on it, and i don't have to take it out of the bike before winter comes. But my real question is. why is it a good idea to change it? Is it because both of those products in case of a spill at the track, they don't make the surface of the track slippery like regular antifreeze?
Just like oil, glycol-based antifreeze is slick and difficult to clean off the track. Switching to 100% distilled water eliminates the antifreeze problem, but lacks corrosion resistance. Engine ice and waterwetter claim to provide both corrosion resistance and increased cooling. Check with your track org, some don't allow engine ice, but waterwetter seems pretty widely accepted.

Like oil drain bolts and line clamps, it's a good idea to safety wire your coolant fill and drain plugs, as well as all of the coolant line clamps.
 

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Motosylum Racing #132
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910 Posts
Plain water will crash you too. Some orgs ban "ethylene glycol" some ban "glycol based" coolants. So check to be sure. The ones I run and race in allow propylene glycol coolant so I use EI. The big difference is PG coolants can easily be soaked up with a rag or "kitty litter" absorbant. We, on the safety crew use "litter" for any wet spill on a dry track. EG does not evaporate, while PG will on hot asphalt. BTW, I would recommend MoCool from Motul over Water Wetter. The anti corrosion properties are much better.
 

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pin it to win it
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Glycol in antifreeze is slick and harder to clean up than just water. Engine ice or water wetter both work. I use ww as it's cheaper and I run it with distilled water. Regular tap water with all the minerals causes more electrolysis, no good.
 

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As been said above -- most PG products will be slippery. One way we've learned to clean them up is to use a propane burner instead of track dry or litter. Most often quicker.

I use the motocool stuff, too. Best way to figure out whats legal is check with the organization you're going to ride with. Everybody allows water, (obvi), not everybody allows other stuff.
 

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Distilled water/water wetter is the way to go.
 
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