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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a bunch of threads here and elsewhere about winter storage, and it seems like there are endless opinions on the issue. Not sure this will be any different, but I'll give some specifics and try my luck.

I'm going to be storing my bike for about 5 months over the winter in a non-heated garage. I put in STA-BIL and topped off the tank. The manual actually says to remove the spark plugs, pour a teaspoon full of oil into each cylinder, then crank over with no spark for long term storage. I really don't want to mess with the plugs until they need to be replaced. Fogging the engine wouldn't be as bad but still requires me to remove the gas tank to get to the air filter. I'm good with hand tools, but a part of me feels like the less I mess with something that's not broken, the better. I'll do it if its really going to be that much better.

I've gotten mixed opinions about starting periodically. Most say if you don't run the engine for a while, it's better not to start the engine at all because you build up condensation due to temperature changes. On the other hand, the R6 will reach it's max temperature at idle, so maybe it's a different story. I'm going to change the oil before any long rides in the spring, but less condensation is still better.

My questions...
1.) Is fogging the engine worth it?
2.) Am I better to start the bike periodically or not? If so, how often?
3.) If I do start periodically, is the battery tender worth using?
4.) Any real benefits to storing the battery indoors if I'm using the Tender?

I'll decide whether to store on stands based on whether I'm going to be moving her periodically to start and how much space my parents can spare in their garage.

Thanks all!
 

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I am in the same exact boat as you, and feel the same way about putting engine oil down the cylinder. Wondering if it is worth it as well as I am sure the previous owner never even bothered. Wish I could answer your questions but I too am curious what other unfortunate people do to winterize their bikes. Not sure what year your is but mines a 2007 and all I did was:

Changed the oil (already changed the filter only about 1k miles before storage)
Stabil with full tank
Lubed the chain real good
I decided to pull the battery because my charger has crappy clips that connect to the terminals so there was no way they were going to stay connected under the seat. I do not think it is necessary to remove it as long as you have it connected to a trickle charger.

From everything I have read starting the engine and letting it idle is not recommended. The only way to do it is to actually ride the bike for 30-60 min when you do start it up. I would still use the battery tender if you do do this though. The extreme cold can discharge a battery relatively quickly.


I am no expert, just sharing what I did. This is my first winter with my bike so learning all the tricks myself. I just do not want to have to replace anything and have my bike down come spring. Wish I (a)could store my bike indoors, or (b)Better yet not have to worry about the winter....ugggggggggh going to be a long winter, not sure I will make it.
 

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pin it to win it
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Disconnect battery and put on tender. Already used stabil. Put it on stands if you can. If you can start it up for a lil every week or so I wouldn't worry about giving fogging it or anything. Make sure your coolant won't freeze. Lube the chain.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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treat the gas, and store it with a FULL tank. Condensation will form inside a partially filled tank. The water will sit at the bottom and does not mix, especially with ethanol blended fuels. if there is anyway to find non-e-gas, that would be a benefit. Run the bike long enough to get the treated gas to the injectors. At idle, this can take awhile, and idling long periods of time, is not good for an r6.. (pretty low oil psi below 4k rpm).

starting the bike periodically won't really help with the battery, unless you hold it above 5k rpm for a bit. You can check the battery at the terminals, and if it goes to 14vt while running, it's fully charged. Just starting and shutting off, will likely leave the battery with a LOWER charge than before. If its' a standard lead cell battery (not a light weight one) tender is not a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks for the input guys. I'm really torn about whether or not I should start it up regularly. I'm leaning against it now, especially with the low oil psi at idle that MELK-MAN mentioned. In general, extra starts means extra wear. But, keeping oil on the cylinders may be worth it, I just don't know.

Tank is as full as I could get it. Looked into buying gas at an airport but it has some lead, which is not good for the catalytic converter and 02 senor. Shell Premium and STABIL will have to do.

Has there been any research on whether fogging or oil in the cylinders actually extend engine lifetime or helps maintain horsepower? I just can't believe many people actually go to this trouble, but, maybe our bikes suffer for it.

EDIT: So, my bike is also fuel injected. There seems to be mixed feelings about fogging a fuel injected engine through the air intake. Most suggest going through the spak plugs is better. Once again, a lot of trouble to get to.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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i fog my motors after every race weekend with wd40.. there is an actual fogging oil you can buy. It won't do diddly through the ram-air, as it will be stopped by the air filter. You would need to pull the tank up, remove the airbox lid, and spray down the velocity stacks while the bike is running. BE CAREFUL TO NOT SPRAY TOO MUCH INTO ONE CYL AT A TIME as you can literally hydrolock the motor if it's idling or low rpm. So just spray from cylinder to cylinder and shut down.

I remove the fuel lines, drain all the fuel (race fuel) from the fuel rails, then run for a bit with fresh gas and stabilizer (seafoam and marvel mystery oil). Then fog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks MELK-MAN. I had heard mixed feelings about fogging fuel injected engines in general. As long as you removed the filter I assume the oil would still make its way into the cylinders. It just seems that most people suggest using the spark plug holes. Removing the gas tank is a bit of trouble to but only four bolts I think. Wouldn't be too bad with two people./ I'll have to see.

I have to ask, why fog every weekend? I can barely decide whether to do it for a few months lol...
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Thanks MELK-MAN. I had heard mixed feelings about fogging fuel injected engines in general. As long as you removed the filter I assume the oil would still make its way into the cylinders. It just seems that most people suggest using the spark plug holes. Removing the gas tank is a bit of trouble to but only four bolts I think. Wouldn't be too bad with two people./ I'll have to see.

I have to ask, why fog every weekend? I can barely decide whether to do it for a few months lol...
some race fuels are nasty. The MR12 i use, leave a horrible residue and has a chemical reaction to the head material within a few days after running.. as bad/worse than ethanol blended fuels. And i don't fog every weekend, i fog after every RACE weekend.. there are usually 3-4 WEEKS between races.

why would you assume a difference in fogging an FI bike vs a carb bike.. ? And pulling spark plugs on any R6 would be more trouble than lifting the tank and removing the air box cover..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The consensus seems to be that you fog a carburated engine, I assume because the oil is good for the carb too, but most people suggest putting oil in a fuel injected engine directly through the plug holes. No harm in fogging I suppose and it should have the same effect for the cylinders.

How effectively does fogging oil coat the cylinder walls if you just put it in through the intake? Most of the bottles suggest you should remove the spark plugs after and spray directly anyway? Wouldn't any fogging oil sprayed while the engine is running just get burned off? How long do you spray to avoid hydrolock?

I didn't realize that race fuels were so corrosive.... not a major concern for me but good to know.
 

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pulling the plugs and fogging is likely a better method for long term storage (more than a few months) AND if you have not recently ran oxygenated race fuels (like mr12 or u4.4).
Fogging it while it's running, and spraying through the v-stacks, will get some fogging oil (or wd40) on the intake valves, and out the exhaust valves and coating the exhaust ports.
Just don't stop on any cylinder while spraying, and you won't hydrolock. If you stop, and are really spraying, at idle, it will be way more that gets in than gets out.. and "CLUNK" , will be the nasty sound of a near hydrolock at best.. or it will flat stop the motor right there at worst. I have seen that done.
Pulling the plugs is SAFER, as you can't hydro lock the engine, you can just crank away with the starter and excess just shoots out the plug hole. But it's not practical just between race weekend fogging...
No, it doesn't all burn out if you are spraying evenly at idle and shut the engine off while doing it. How i know this is cause when i fire it up later, it smokes a lot, with the distinctive smell of wd40 for a second. :)
 

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treat the gas, and store it with a FULL tank. Condensation will form inside a partially filled tank. The water will sit at the bottom and does not mix, especially with ethanol blended fuels. if there is anyway to find non-e-gas, that would be a benefit. Run the bike long enough to get the treated gas to the injectors. At idle, this can take awhile, and idling long periods of time, is not good for an r6.. (pretty low oil psi below 4k rpm).

starting the bike periodically won't really help with the battery, unless you hold it above 5k rpm for a bit. You can check the battery at the terminals, and if it goes to 14vt while running, it's fully charged. Just starting and shutting off, will likely leave the battery with a LOWER charge than before. If its' a standard lead cell battery (not a light weight one) tender is not a bad idea.
Another point I try to convey concerning periodic starting, is the fact that you won't likely get the oil hot enough to burn off condensation and contaminants from the fuel. So in addition to draining the battery, you are circulating contaminants and water that won't leave your bearing surfaces etc until the next time the engine makes enough heat to evaporate the moisture.

If you can't get the motor to operating temperature and RPM, you may very well be better off not starting it occasionally. In my opinion. Your actual mileage may vary. Price does not include tax, tags and shipping. Any reproduction of this post without the implied verbal consent of little league baseball is possibly forbidden.
 
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