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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Noob question- How can I match the rebound settings on both my forks? I tried to turn them all the way to the right to get them both at the maximum rebound and then go from there but there wasn't any barrier that stopped them so it tightened to the point where it rotated the whole fork when I turned it. I ended up mangling the metal of the adjuster trying to loosen it up, requiring a wrench to hold the preload nut in order to pry the rebound adjuster loose. I gave up on that method and currently have 2 different settings. I was under the impression that turning them to a maximum and going from there was a valid way to do it but it certainly didn't work for me. Now I feel like a complete moron running around with different settings on my forks. Will it work to turn them to the maximum softness and go from there? I don't want to try it and fail as miserably as I did with my first attempt. Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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What do you mean you turned them until the whole fork turned?

Generally, you turn them until they are lightly seated, then open an even amount of clicks. If you force them past that point you risk ruining the needles down inside the forks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I kept turning it because I figured it would stop at the maximum tightness but it got so tight that turning the rebound adjuster was turning the fork. It kept clicking so I just figured I was fine and it would stop at the maximum but it never did.
 

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I'd get them to a professional for inspection and possible rebuild.
 

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No worries.

Depending on the year, there may not be any real damage. Some of the forks have a tube for a rebound adjusting rod. That tube would not take the force you describe. Good thing about that is the tube would deform before the needle could do any damage. But if it were a solid rod inside there the chances are that the rebound valve or adjuster may be damaged.

Where are you located? I may know of somewhere you can take them.
 

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It sounds to me like the preload adjuster was turning as you were trying to screw your rebound adjuster in. The reason you don't count clicks from out to in is because if your caps or rebound rod or anything is off by just a little bit, your needles will end up in a different positionin relation to the seats. If you count from all the way in, then the needles have a chance to be seated, then your needles will be equally spaced from the seats as your count out. Graves Motorsports Suspension Department can handle anything you need for your R6. From a simple stock fork problem such as yours, to a race setup for a top level racer, each job is handled with the same professional craftsmanship used on our championship winning race team bikes. Please visit our website at www.gravesport.com or call our suspension department at (818) 902-1942
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So you're saying that putting them at the maximum rebound stiffness and going from there is, in fact, the correct way to do it? If that is the way to do it then what did I do wrong? And yes I think it was my preload adjuster turning with the rebound adjuster.
 

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So you're saying that putting them at the maximum rebound stiffness and going from there is, in fact, the correct way to do it? If that is the way to do it then what did I do wrong? And yes I think it was my preload adjuster turning with the rebound adjuster.
Yes you set them correctly the first time, something just went wrong though!

It could be one of two things.

1.) Your adjuster was in fact screwed all the way in and you thought that it was still clicking away, and in turn you were increasing your preload with your screw adjuster. That would in turn jam it in there so tight that you may not be able to unscrew it like you say.

2.) Your rebound adjuster is very very dirty and corroded, causing it to turn your preload adjuster while you are still screwing in the rebound adjuster.

Both things can happen to you, just remember that Graves Motorsports can now supply you with replacement parts if needed to repair your forks, or you can send them in to us to inspect and repair. If you have any more questions visit www.gravesport.com or call the suspension department at (818) 902-1942.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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I think you messed up. Different suspension guys and books will tell you differently, but generally, suspension settings are set from full soft to whatever number of clicks out to stiff. In that case you would turn the adjuster all the way out, or counterclockwise, until it seats. Then you would turn it back in a particular number of clicks and repeat that on the other fork leg.

In your case it sounds as if you may have gone to far to the point where it is likely that you jammed the adjuster into it's stops to far. The rebound setting uses a rod to adjust the rebound oil flow. The fork cap contains the needed mechanical pieces to make that possible. In your case you may just have to replace the fork caps.

Once you get things figured out, I would work on being gentle. The reason most books prescribe going to full soft first, then back in to X stiffness settings, is to protect the needles from being jammed in too far. If you back the setting out ( softer, or counterclockwise ) you will be bringing the needle away from it's seat. Since most suspension settings will be adjusted to a setting somewhere towards it's stiff side it's not a bad practice. That way you will never jam the needle if it is already seated from a full stiff setting.

Others that go with the full stiff, then back off school, do it because it is more accurate for equal fork settings. If the valve is seated then you back it off X number of clicks then you stand a better chance that both fork legs will be the same . Some forks don't have an equal number of clicks on both legs. So from full soft to X stiff, the settings may be different. From full stiff to X soft there is a better chance that the settings are the same. One click difference in either leg isn't bad and won't make you crash, or the bike be uncontrollable, it just means that the forks are not as finely tunable for suspension woes. One way to tell how close your forks are is to count the total number of clicks each leg will produce. If they are within a click or two it should be fine. Three clicks or more it may be a good idea to have them serviced to be the same.

I think you may need to have your forks serviced though. It's a good thing anyway since the forks are several years old. It will do more good than harm to have them re-furbished. While your at it get some springs for your weight as well. You can get a set for around a $100 bucks. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah I think I will try to get someone to look at them before I go to the track again. Also what happens when you go to the full softness? Does it just stop at the maximum soft setting or will it unscrew something and mess things up even worse than I already have? I'm scared to go mess with them since I messed up so bad the first time. Thanks for your suggestions.
 

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It should be pretty apparent when the screw has stopped. It will click when it turns and then when at max settings it will stop as if your tightening a screw. When it is difficult to turn and there is no click then you are at the end of adjustment. All of the clicks are evenly graduated so the clicks will be about the same deg. of a turn apart. So if the screw gets hard to turn and you can't get another clickSTOP.......That is the end of adjustment.

There is usually about 12-14 clicks from full soft to full hard on the older generation bikes. You can try and turn it out or in. As long as it is clicking when it turns you are good. The adjuster for rebound will break internally if man handled. So the adjuster screw will just turn infinitely if broken. If it has stopped and it is just really tough to turn you have to know which way to turn it. Is it all the way in or out? Try turning it out first ( counter clockwise ) to see if it will back off. If not then try turning it in. The parts are aluminum and are easy to break. So be gentle and not too aggressive.

The compression adjusters are different though. They have about the same number of clicks worth in adjustment, but you are actually turning the needle. So if you over tighten it, you can damage the needle and it's seat. If you back it out to far you may damage the screw piece, breaking off the adjuster. The compression adjuster is a little more durable and easier to see what is going on. It will go in or out as you adjust it.

As for the settings, yes there is a maximum and minimum. Both of those will stop the adjuster screw when the maximum, or minimum setting is reached. If the adjuster turns infinitely and doesn't click, then something is broken and or very wrong.
 

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Sounds like an 06 to me...

The rod that the rebound adjuster pushes down through the damping rod is WAY too soft for what it should be. I was pissed at a bloke who did some suspension work for me until I found out that it's a common thing with those forks.

Mushes out instead of hitting a hard botton, right?
 

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I missed that it was an 07. In that case there are no clicks on the compression settings. You have to measure the compression settings or keep track of the number of turns. the adjusters still stop at the end of adjustment range. The rebound has something like 40 clicks from soft to hard. Everything else still applies.
 

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I missed that it was an 07. In that case there are no clicks on the compression settings. You have to measure the compression settings or keep track of the number of turns. the adjusters still stop at the end of adjustment range. The rebound has something like 40 clicks from soft to hard. Everything else still applies.
There are clicks in the low speed compression.

Owner's manual.
 
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