Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The Motul oil selection tool recommends 7100 for the R6. My R6 was up for its 10,000km change, so I put in 7100 10W40 and a new filter as well. Not sure what was in there before, but there is not much difference in feedback that new R6-rider me can tell.

If 10,000km later, nothing untoward has happened in relation to oil, I will probably go with 7100 again. That is to say, if I were to pick today, I would still choose 7100.

However, I read many people are using 300V on the road. Supposedly, though, it does not have the detergents that would support running it for a longer time between changes. My question is this: If you use 300V, are you using it on the road, and if so, do you change it out more frequently than the recommended schedule?

Second question -- if you have used 7100 as well, do you notice a difference on the road (not track) between 300V and 7100? Do you see value in 300V for road use?

Cheers
James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
ive used Motul 300v on my second gen and loved it. I didn't ride asmuch so I would change the oil every spring and just do about 3000 miles a year. I just swapped my 18 from factory oil to 300v and noticed a better feeling. its all preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,910 Posts
300v is a waste on a streetbike...especially one that idles and frequent low rpm operation.

Motul issued a statement about the primary use of 300v and developed the 7100 for street applications.

You realize the interval change on 300v is extremely frequent... like after every weekend type frequent if you are riding/racing closed courses.
I think it was the 2017 season... my buddy ran 14 events and spent ~$900 on oil/filters over the season. Thats nothing compared to the $17,000 on tires the same year...lol
He got free brake pads and some purse money so he about broke even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
300v is a waste on a streetbike...especially one that idles and frequent low rpm operation.

Motul issued a statement about the primary use of 300v and developed the 7100 for street applications.

You realize the interval change on 300v is extremely frequent... like after every weekend type frequent if you are riding/racing closed courses.
I think it was the 2017 season... my buddy ran 14 events and spent ~$900 on oil/filters over the season. Thats nothing compared to the $17,000 on tires the same year...lol
He got free brake pads and some purse money so he about broke even.

well track events id imagine so. but for a fun weekend warrior bike its not bad. just check on the oil level and so forth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I use 300V. On every bike I ever owned it has made shifting noticeably smoother.

Motul has said 5000-7000km oil change intervals for street bikes running 300V is reasonable and there are tons of blackstone reports that shows that is fairly accurate. 300V has a shorter life than 7100 but its not like it needs changed continuously for street use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,910 Posts
I use 300V. On every bike I ever owned it has made shifting noticeably smoother.

Motul has said 5000-7000km oil change intervals for street bikes running 300V is reasonable and there are tons of blackstone reports that shows that is fairly accurate. 300V has a shorter life than 7100 but its not like it needs changed continuously for street use.

do I need a blackstone report to tell me what Motul has already explained?
The smoother shifting caveat is in your head.
Ive owned a few bikes since the 70s... shifting has never been an issue with any one of those hundreds of bikes. Its usually the "cheap" pot metal shifter levers put on production bikes, or the $.25 shift star on the gear selector or just poor technique from the rider. Such things appear when you turn a commuter or mini trail bike into a race bike. Also NO lubricant on the earth is going to make poor machine work better.
 
Joined
·
16 Posts
Ive only run 300V in my "17"cause I figr'd I had to be a total bad ass. I do run my bike hard on the street/track, but after reading the "takes" from the 7100 vs 300V posts Im forced to reconsider the costs/frequency of changes and lack of detergents issues of my 300V total bad ass decision. I'm gonna run 7100 which now forces me to remove the "bad" from total bad ass...which leaves me with ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,910 Posts
300v is a high quality lubricant. And it has its place in high performance applications because it does prevent bearing & journal wear on rotating parts that see prolonged high RPM operation. Also its provides enough surface protection to maybe increase the output of the engine 1 or 2hp. In a streetbike... Im going to guess that 99.9% of them dont see sustained high RPM operation so thats why the 7100 is a better lubricant for "street" operated bikes. It comes in a cool red color and doesnt smell like bananas like the 300v.
I put the 7100 in just about everything thats not a race engine. Scooters, generators, lawn mowers... you name it. Makes top offs a breeze without having to fret over opening a new quart or gallon. Well thats never really happened so...lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
do I need a blackstone report to tell me what Motul has already explained?
Its nice to have confirmation of the makers claims with so much snake oil out there. Motul markets 300V as a race oil and 7100 as a maintenance oil, they do not say you can't use 300V on a street bike.

The smoother shifting caveat is in your head.
Ester based oils sheer resistance is documented, smoother shifting is the result. I didn't mention cooler running or smoother power because they might be in my head. The argument that 300V does not have as much detergent that 7100 has is missing the point, 300V is a 100% group V oil and tends to clean engines without the need for additional detergents vs a blend (Its not clear what 7100 is based on the MSDS, im guessing a blend of group V and IV stocks).

In short I don't see any problem with running 300V in a street bikes with the compromise that the oil will have to be changed a little more frequently. It costs me $60 for a 4L jug of 7100 and $62.50 for a 4L jug of 300V, cost is relatively nothing between them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,910 Posts
In short I don't see any problem with running 300V in a street bikes with the compromise that the oil will have to be changed a little more frequently. It costs me $60 for a 4L jug of 7100 and $62.50 for a 4L jug of 300V, cost is relatively nothing between them.
except for the engine operating RPMs... if you ride a streetbike like a racebike... then yah the 300v is a good choice. However if you're idling at traffic lights and barely moving the tach needle on surface streets... then the 7100 is a better choice.

That being said I have used the 7100 extensively in air cooled engines like on small equipment and mini bikes. Its a great lubricant!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,907 Posts
So your argument is that 300V handles sustained high RPM operation better than 7100?
it has more ester oil content so yes, it should. I was using 300v but due to the lack of information from motul regarding how long it can be used I switched to something else. motul just responded to me saying they suggest I send in a used sample to a lab for analysis. that will tell me how long it can be used.

I switched to MPT since they say it can be used far longer than most oils on the market. and they tell you exactly what is in the oil. they say 0% petroleum oils or additives and 100% synthetic additives and base oil.

so far I can clearly feel an improvement over motul 300v in shifting and clutch performance. ive been running it all summer.
http://mptindustries.com/mpt_products/motorcycle.htm
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top