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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

New to the forum. Looking at buying my first R6.(And first supersport). The below craigslist ad seems to good to be true. Does anyone by chance know who is selling the bike or if anyone on here has owned it before?

Selling party does not have mod list or service record.
Doesn't know if it's been lowered.
Has a "light kit."
Vin: JYARJ12E86A004752

Just by looking at the pictures: It has some weird, long frame sliders. Stock exhaust, shorty levers.

I'm located in Savannah and can't afford to drive 2 1/2 hours to check out the bike.

Just looking for some advice.

https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/mcy/4678633511.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wouldn't say it's too good to be true. Just seems a little odd to me. Haven't been able to find an R6 with 20,000+ miles for less than 5.

I plan on going to check out the bike this coming weekend. And yes....that rear tire is horrible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Down here in Savannah it's hard to find good deals sometimes. We are able to ride year round. (With a good jacket).

I've talked the gentleman down a little due to it needing tires. I'm really worried about this "light kit" he speaks of. I'd want to remove it, but I'm worried about the wiring.

Also worried about paying to much.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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To me, 4200 seems a bit high. That is just my opinion, though. If I remember right, it is going to need the valve clearances checked at 26k and the rear tire is shot.

Either way, if you like it and you feel like it is a good deal, go for it.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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Do you guys have a rough estimate for how much it's going to cost to put on new tires?
My family just ruined my old ones by spilling oil all over them. I paid about 300 bucks for my set of Michelin Pilot Road 3 tires and put them on myself. If you go with something like Pilot Powers, you can probably get them of the internet for 240 or so. Probably a little less if you really shop around. You will still have to get them mounted, though.

If you take it to a shop to have them mount the tires, expect to pay at least 20 bucks per tire for them to mount them. Some shops around here are as high as 60 bucks per tire if the wheels are still on the bike. I think that is insane, so I just got some tire irons and do it myself to save the money.

If you buy the tires from a shop, make sure to take some vaseline so it doesn't hurt as bad when they **** you over on the price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the info. I don't plan on buying tires from a shop. I plan on ordering from Revzilla (free shipping). Just need to do a little research on what tires I want.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bike will mainly be used for commuting. Some back roads and highway. Just want a set with good grip. I won't be riding in the wet conditions unless I get caught in them. Maybe some hard mountain riding once a year.

Ive been told tires wear really fast due to their compound structure. I want as much life out of them as possible, within reason.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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Bike will mainly be used for commuting. Some back roads and highway. Just want a set with good grip. I won't be riding in the wet conditions unless I get caught in them. Maybe some hard mountain riding once a year.

Ive been told tires wear really fast due to their compound structure. I want as much life out of them as possible, within reason.
It sounds like you have about the same demands as I do. I wanted something that gripped good, but was also long lasting. The last set of tires I had was the Pilot Road 2 by Michelin. I had over 10k on them and still had probably another 7k miles left in them when they got ruined. They weren't as grippy as the Pilot Power tires I used before that, but they were still more than enough grip for me to get a knee down. Honestly, I would even be willing to run them for a track day in the beginner group. They wouldn't really be ideal for anything too tough at the track, but they were very good tires that took almost no time to warm up. The pilot road 3 tires i replaced them with seem even more grippy on the braking aspect. Obviously, I can't say anything about how well they will wear. I ran the road 2 tires at 34psi cold in the front and rear. I put 36 in the road 3 tires and they gripped great for me. I literally pulled a stoppie at the end of my street, and that was after less than a quarter mile of straight line riding.

Obviously, the more sport oriented the tire is, the more grip you will have. The problem with that is that it costs tire life. I went away from the pilot power setup i liked because i was commuting 30 miles on the highway and wearing out the centers of them after about 4k miles. The edges always had a ton of life left when I was throwing them out, but the centers were shot. I don't really have much experience with other tire brands, but if memory serves me right, the Bridgestone BT-016 tire should also give pretty good longevity and grip.

I am going to upload a picture of my rear tire when it got ruined. The picture is after it has had a bit over 10k miles on it.

EDIT: by no means would i recommend the pilot road series as a track tire. It is supposed to be sport-touring. It is sporty enough to get a knee down when you want, and touring enough to be able to last a decent while.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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That is pretty similar to how i do it. Here is the video i followed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0s2NzImDhA


For the back tire, i use my truck to run over the tire and break the bead. obviously, you have to be careful and not run over your rim instead. For the front tire, i just used a big ass C clamp to break it. Then i just use some windex as lubricant and start using some tire spoons to get the old ones off. After that, I slide one side of the tire onto the rim and work the other side on with some tire spoons and windex. It is a bit of work, but I don't mind.

EDIT: the other thing i do before i mount the tires is go over the tread with some sandpaper. I have heard horror stories of people getting tires with a lot of slippery mold release from the manufacturing process on the tread. I just rough it up with some sandpaper. I have no idea if it really makes any difference, but i do it because it makes me feel more at ease.
 

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I eat what my R6 cooks!
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You will hear it for sure. It is quite a loud pop.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOlFE_JHCqQ

Just skip to about the 3 minute mark. When he is filling the tire, you can clearly hear the bead pop on(and see him kind of jump). You should hear two of those pops, and that means the bead is seated. Then just give the tire a good look to be sure there are no spots where it looks like it didnt seat properly.
 

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A little trick I used for putting my tires on recently is to use zip ties. I put five 24" zip tires around the tire and sinched them down as tight as I could. Then the tire almost fell onto the wheel. Cut the zip ties and start filling with air. When you fill it I also put a strap around the circumference of the tire. Helps hold it down so the air traps in the tire to pop the bead in place.
 
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