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Discussion Starter #1
I've been on a bike now for about 300miles. first bike ever... no dirtbike... nothing. 100% FRESH!!! I feel real comfortable on the bike. My question to all you more experienced riders. What is the "proper" way to enter / exit a corner. (Basic city bend, 90%/45%) Where should your weight be?

- What i've been told so far is shift your body more forward when you enter the turn and after you hit the apex shift it back.

I'm still a little girl about hitting bends, thats the only thing I'm unsure of. I'm still afraid to throttle through the turn (nervous the back is going to slide). How do I get rid of this fear.

Any input, video links, readings, etc...
 

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Go buy "twist of the wrist volume II"
Go do the MSF course
Basicallt take the turn as late as you feel comfortable. Late apex, elbows bent, head turned all the way towards the turn. Keep adjusting your eyes all the way through the end of the turn. Just start from there and worry about the more advanced stuff later. Be safe man!
 

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Racers will say dont hit your back break.... I find if you hit a corner a little hot and just drag the rear break a little it does help but if you hit it too hard you have a chance of sliding out. Dont ride the front breaks on a corner because it will cause the front to dive. Personally I try to stay neutral on the bike, keep pressure on the outside peg lean into the corner, and just throttle through it. Stay on the balls of your feet otherwise the side of your foot will drag on the ground when you really lay it out. Im no pro in sportbike riding by any means but this is what I have found. Once you start getting the hang of it sportbikes and motocross bikes are extremely different... I race motocross (A class) so trust me it is very different...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My MSF course is set for this wed. thurs. sat. sun. I think i'll learn alot from that. I just wanted to get a head start.
 

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Racers will say dont hit your back break.... I find if you hit a corner a little hot and just drag the rear break a little it does help but if you hit it too hard you have a chance of sliding out. Dont ride the front breaks on a corner because it will cause the front to dive. Personally I try to stay neutral on the bike, keep pressure on the outside peg lean into the corner, and just throttle through it. Stay on the balls of your feet otherwise the side of your foot will drag on the ground when you really lay it out. Im no pro in sportbike riding by any means but this is what I have found. Once you start getting the hang of it sportbikes and motocross bikes are extremely different... I race motocross (A class) so trust me it is very different...

Say I'm coming into a corner and exiting and I notice that i'm heading toward the outside of the lane/curb. Would I lean back down or brake/slow down - if so... which brake?

Do you turn better when you push on the handle bars or lean?

...does breaking force the bike to straighten up?? seems like it...
 

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Say I'm coming into a corner and exiting and I notice that i'm heading toward the outside of the lane/curb. Would I lean back down or brake/slow down - if so... which brake?

Do you turn better when you push on the handle bars or lean?

...does breaking force the bike to straighten up?? seems like it...
If you start drifting too far outside you may be going too fast in that situation. You will drift that way but if you get nurvous thats where I said dragging the back break may help. If you do hit the front break the bike will stand up instead of lean and the front will dive. The back break (mostly useless) when light pressure is applied will not stand the bike up and can be dragged through the corner. But too much can cause the rear wheel to lock and slide.

*Side note - Pro trick in motocross is to drag the breaks through the corners to keep the bike tracking straight over bumps*

As for the handle bar question. I really dont know what helps. Think of when your on a bicycle. You dont turn the bars when your going fast. You lean into it. And a neat thing I noticed when I first started is go down a straight road - turn the bar to the right slightly - the bike goes left. Turn it left - the bike goes right. Its cool.
 

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This is the book I read before I started racing. Twist of the wrist is good, but I found this book to be better.

http://www.amazon.com/Sport-Riding-Techniques-Develop-Confidence/dp/1893618072

Read it and do the excersizes. Once you get the fundamentals down, it's all about practice. I'd say take a racing school. The best place to learn proper riding skills. I would reccommend penguin. I took it last year, and plan to go back this year for the advanced course in homestead.

Good luck.
 

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This is the book I read before I started racing. Twist of the wrist is good, but I found this book to be better.

http://www.amazon.com/Sport-Riding-Techniques-Develop-Confidence/dp/1893618072

Read it and do the excersizes. Once you get the fundamentals down, it's all about practice. I'd say take a racing school. The best place to learn proper riding skills. I would reccommend penguin. I took it last year, and plan to go back this year for the advanced course in homestead.

Good luck.
+1 on racing school but I say get through the MSF first :nocontrol
 

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You would be supprised. Its a trick in motocross that helps it track better on the edges of the tires. If you dont it can cause you to underside...
 

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Best way to hit a corning is the way that you visualize it before you enter it. I'm in Bulgaria and we don't have an MSF equivalent, so I don't know what they teach; but I'm sure it's something in line with that.

When you approach a corner the first thing you do to prepare is to place your eye on the route through (of course keep your peripheral vision open, you don't want to tunnel vision your way through). You can break all the way to your apex, but you don't want your front fork depressed by the time you reach the apex so if you still need a little speed reduction don't be afraid to trail brake (using your rear brake in the corner), just do it really lightly, gentle you'd be surprised how much a gentle caress on your rear brake will affect your cornering.

Lastly, don't be afraid of the throttle; once you've completed your approach to the apex, you want to enter "maintenance mode" meaning you want to hold a maintenance throttle position (just crack the throttle open to the point where you're just maintaining your speed - helps to keep the front from depressing).

Give it a try, slowly but surely you'll get it.
 

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i have noticed (new to street riding also) that something they teach you in MSF course is important. always look where you want to go. through the turn i have found if im on a entrance ramp or something to the highway and i start to look infont of the bike instead of through the turn i start to either drift in or out on the turn but if i look through the turn and stay easy with the bike it just goes right through dead center and feels like its supposed to be.
 

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You would be supprised. Its a trick in motocross that helps it track better on the edges of the tires. If you dont it can cause you to underside...
But you recommend it for street riding?

Here are a bunch of articles about riding technique that I read. One of them (I can't remember which) recommends pressing on the inside peg. By doing so, you can release the counter steering pressure on the bars and completely focus on throttle control. When I gave it a try I was quite amazed how well it works. You can basically hold your line the entire way through a turn easier without any input on the bars. At any point if you need to make any adjustments mid corner, it takes a lot less pressure on the bars if you are steering with your lower body already.
 

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But you recommend it for street riding?
I recomend dragging the rear wheel through the beginning of the turn apex. Its a whole different concept on the road for bumps. Hopefully you arent going through 3ft acceleration bumps :lmao Just like in motocross if you start to swapp side to side withthe rear end instead of letting off the throttle you get on it harder. Gyro effect straightens you back out....

What I mean by dragging the rear break is entering the corner break as usual on the front wheel. If you carried too much speed (not on purpose) You can still start your leaning and cornering while applying the breaks for a little longer. AS someone stated if you apply the front break the bike will tend to lift up. If you apply the rear it will just slow you down slightly...
 

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Say I'm coming into a corner and exiting and I notice that i'm heading toward the outside of the lane/curb. Would I lean back down or brake/slow down - if so... which brake?

Do you turn better when you push on the handle bars or lean?

...does breaking force the bike to straighten up?? seems like it...
If you're heading wide, then for god sake dont look at the curb, look where you want to end up. I thought the same when i started riding but believe me it makes a huge difference to the outcome. And like has already been said if you really must brake, dont go for the front, but apply a little rear brake just to scrub that little bit of extra speed off.

Ideally though, you want to look where you want to go, preferbly with your head right over near the mirror and your inside shoulder dropped down (i.e. the weight over the inside handlebar) and hang off the bike more/crank it over and apply light throttle to keep it balanced rather than loaded up and the front. It turns alot better when the weight is balanced front to rear :D
 

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If you're heading wide, then for god sake dont look at the curb, look where you want to end up. I thought the same when i started riding but believe me it makes a huge difference to the outcome. And like has already been said if you really must brake, dont go for the front, but apply a little rear brake just to scrub that little bit of extra speed off.

Ideally though, you want to look where you want to go, preferbly with your head right over near the mirror and your inside shoulder dropped down (i.e. the weight over the inside handlebar) and hang off the bike more/crank it over and apply light throttle to keep it balanced rather than loaded up and the front. It turns alot better when the weight is balanced front to rear :D
+1 Definately good advice!!! Always look where you want to go. If you look your bound to go that way. If you look at the wrong place your screwed....
 

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Go buy "twist of the wrist volume II"
Go do the MSF course
Basicallt take the turn as late as you feel comfortable. Late apex, elbows bent, head turned all the way towards the turn. Keep adjusting your eyes all the way through the end of the turn. Just start from there and worry about the more advanced stuff later. Be safe man!
:werd


Double :werd on the MSF course
 

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Will work for track time
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I recomend dragging the rear wheel through the beginning of the turn apex. Its a whole different concept on the road for bumps. Hopefully you arent going through 3ft acceleration bumps :lmao Just like in motocross if you start to swapp side to side withthe rear end instead of letting off the throttle you get on it harder. Gyro effect straightens you back out....

What I mean by dragging the rear break is entering the corner break as usual on the front wheel. If you carried too much speed (not on purpose) You can still start your leaning and cornering while applying the breaks for a little longer. AS someone stated if you apply the front break the bike will tend to lift up. If you apply the rear it will just slow you down slightly...
No offense towards you directly but this guy is a newb. I dont think people should be encouraging advanced skills such as "dragging the rear brake" to a total newbie. To me I think he just needs to get the basics down and then go from there. Just my $0.02
 

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No offense towards you directly but this guy is a newb. I dont think people should be encouraging advanced skills such as "dragging the rear brake" to a total newbie. To me I think he just needs to get the basics down and then go from there. Just my $0.02
Yeah good point... But everyone needs to learn somewhere. MSF is number 1
 
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