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I hate you Turn 4!
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Good stuff, going to try the spring trick with my rear brake on my after market rearsets
 

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I have 2 belly buttons.
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I know my woodcraft rearsets came with the option to add in the rear brake lever spring which I did. I might try to experiment with the rear brake a little next season.
 

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billdozer
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it's definitely there for a reason, and not so everyone can tell you NOT to use it lol.

I think a few rear brake only drills at the beginning of next season is on my agenda so we can be more friendly with each other on a regular basis.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Discussion Starter #8
i like the idea of a rear brake only drill..
taking the rear pads off and filing/grinding a bevel will serve 2 purposes. 1) it will give the desired affect outlined in the video of a bit less outright rear brake power 2) it makes rear wheel changes SOOOOO much easier, as the rear rotor slides right up in there EVEN if the pads came together.
 

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Stunt Rider
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I use a lot........ of rear brake.

Ridick - Skeet Skeet Skeet!!!!
 

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pin it to win it
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What do y'all mean by bevel the pad? Just cutting the edge at a angle to reduce surface area? When I googled it all I found was people cutting vertical groves in the pad.

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Discussion Starter #12
What do y'all mean by bevel the pad? Just cutting the edge at a angle to reduce surface area? When I googled it all I found was people cutting vertical groves in the pad.

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the leading edge, most inner side, that would contact the rotor first when you are putting the rear wheel in .. just putting a 45deg angle on that leading edge so there is a "^" that the rotor slides into instead of hitting square edges. The more you grind (making the bevel larger) the less surface area of the actual pad makes contact with the rotor surface. As the pad wears, the bevel will go away, so ya need to eventually hit the brake pad edge with the file/grinder again.
 

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pin it to win it
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Got ya. Free mods ftw Lol. i'm used to using the rear brake in mx to stop and steer but I never use it on the sport bike.

Does using the rear brake while leaned over transfer a lot of weight to the front? Half of me thinks it would and the other half thinks it would just cause the rear to squat and tighten the turn. Or both?

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In theory use of the rear brake while leaned over brings the bike back around if you're drifting out.

I could be off but I believe I read this in one of the motorcycle racing technique books.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Discussion Starter #15
In theory use of the rear brake while leaned over brings the bike back around if you're drifting out.

I could be off but I believe I read this in one of the motorcycle racing technique books.
yup. That is the case. it has limitations obviously (right handers) but is a tool that with practice, can be useful. The sooner one starts trying it, the sooner they are comfortable.
 

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pin it to win it
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Can one trail brake with the front if they are comfortable doing so? Or is that just something you shouldn't do?

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Discussion Starter #18
Can one trail brake with the front if they are comfortable doing so? Or is that just something you shouldn't do?

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assuming you have available traction, you can always trail brake the front. The benefit of using the rear brake is, it's gonna put less stress on the limited traction of the front tire in a corner where you are already close to the limit of front traction. And, 2 brakes slow you faster than 1. It's not gonna shave 2 seconds off your lap time, but will be useful at times..
 

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Another thing I've seen/been told is to not bleed the brakes as well as you would for the front which results in a soft/spongy lever. This way if you still somehow manage to stomp on the brake it's not (theoretically) going to lock the rear wheel since there is air in the line but you'll still have significant stopping power.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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Discussion Starter #20
Another thing I've seen/been told is to not bleed the brakes as well as you would for the front which results in a soft/spongy lever. This way if you still somehow manage to stomp on the brake it's not (theoretically) going to lock the rear wheel since there is air in the line but you'll still have significant stopping power.
i don't know about that one.. air bubbles are funny things, and the "soft/spongy" feel won't always be consistent. You would be better off bleeding the lines properly, and then doing what Scott Russell suggested in the vid (in my opinion).. of lowering the pedal, bevel/cut the pads, and if really going extreme, lightening the rear rotor for less surface area (along with beveling the pads).
Lowering the pedal should be first on the list though. This way you would have to darn near put your ankle in an uncomfortable position to lock up the rear brake (unless you take your foot off the peg and literally stomp on it with your heel).
 
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