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Reppin' that 405
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Discussion Starter #1
i just got my frist bike (2004 R6) i only put about 3-4 hrs total on it. i've been riding up to a empty parking lot that i live close by just doing turns and such and getting used to it. but is this normal for me to not feel more comfortable about riding? is there some other stuff i can practice instead of just turns?

please dont flame me :( :flaming :flaming
 

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Custom User Title
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first off, i got on 04 R6 and its the best thing in the world. its a new thing for you dude, of course its gonna be uncomfortable. i remember when i first started riding (i tought myself) i took off in my apartment complex and got to a turn and starting thinking *lean to turn lean to turn,,wait its not turning WTF!!! curbs right there!!!* then i figured everything out and took it down the street a lil ways (back roads with no traffic) and after a day or so got used to the (bike) then a car passed me and i was a lil freaked. it was so much more different then in a car. long story short, there is a break in get comfortable time but after that , your hooked and get to do the best drug in the world every day you ride.
 

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DallasKrew.com
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when i first got my bike..i rode around the apartment complex about a few hundred time lol till i got the courage to take it out to the street..slowly as i felt more comfortable started taking it to the streets and back country roads. I am not at a 100% yet but just have to keep practicing at it till you feel like the bike is just an extentsion to your body and you can control it like a lot more easier..
 

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Don't forget to look through the turn, turn your head where you want to go and the bike will follow. Riding a bicycle is good practice, it will help you get a feel for being on two wheels. Throttle control as well as clutching, shifting, and braking can all be learned in a straight line. Also, never brake while turning or leaning. It will cause you to lose traction, which is what is keeping both wheels on the ground and you on the seat.
 

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DallasKrew.com
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portaman03 said:
Don't forget to look through the turn, turn your head where you want to go and the bike will follow. Riding a bicycle is good practice, it will help you get a feel for being on two wheels. Throttle control as well as clutching, shifting, and braking can all be learned in a straight line. Also, never brake while turning or leaning. It will cause you to lose traction, which is what is keeping both wheels on the ground and you on the seat.


In my msf course had a kid crash while braking through a corner and that has stuck with me. You get so tempted to hit the brake if you feel like you are not going to make it through the corner, to start off take your corners really slow and as you keep going through them practice it with a little more speed and lean..if all else fails and it is safe to straighten out the bike and brake do that..
 

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Can't drag ****.
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Bro it just takes time and practice, i have about 4 months and 1000 miles under my belt and i still get very squemish(sic) around turns... Some very good tips i have for you:

Take the MSF course (DEFINETLY)

ALWAYS look as far through the turn as you can, your bike will follow your head, trust your bike.

Practice counter-steering around the 15-20mph area, i rode around for a few months with little understanding of how countersteering worked. Go up to about 15 miles an hour and turn your bike as you would a bicycle. Youll notice whichever way you turn your bars, the bike goes the opposite direction. Turn more, lean more, turn more, lean more. This instilled much more confidence in my riding. you arent necessarily supposed to "turn" your bars but, push your bars.

Ride at your own pace, even if you ride with others, dont push yourself, you WILL be tempted to. First time i went on a ride with others we hit the canyons and i went down because i didnt understand countersteering, was trying to keep up, and hit the brakes mid turn. The bike stood right up just like the instructors said. I went wide and hit some dirt and went down around 30mph. Was in full gear so i walked away without much damage to the bike and no damage to myself. (stupid)

Always wear full gear including pants if you have them.

Wait at least 6 months before canyons, they are a blast but, dangerous.

Make sure your tires are warm before you try any hard acceleration or hard cornering. I usually ride for about 15 minutes before i even think about trying anything possibly dangerous.

Do NOT use your rear brake, even though the instructors tell you to, the few times i have used it under medium braking, the tire locked up. The front brakes on these bikes are designed to take the full load. (correct me if im wrong).

Dont corner yourself in a parking lot, you have to get out there on the road otherwise youll psych yourself out more and more. A parking lot only offers so much practice.

Assume anything and everything that a car could possibly do to knock you off your bike, WILL happen, and adjust your positioning on the street accordingly.

People love to pull out in front of you and STOP because they freak out that a bike is coming at them. Expect it.

Thats all i got for now.
 

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Dragging Knee
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Practice what they taught you at the msf course.

Practice hard braking from about 30mph and comming to a complete stop as quickly as you can. Being good on the brakes is extremely important.

Practice turns make sure you are looking through the corner and make sure you are giving the bike some gas while cornering this will make the bike feel more stable.

Practice swerving around objects by setting up cones. This teaches you how to handle the bike if you have to make a quick lane change to avoid something.

You should be uncomfortable for awhile but practicing the basic skills will help you become a more confident rider and sharpen your skills.
 

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Ridin' dirty...
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matttx said:
i just got my frist bike (2004 R6) i only put about 3-4 hrs total on it. i've been riding up to a empty parking lot that i live close by just doing turns and such and getting used to it. but is this normal for me to not feel more comfortable about riding? is there some other stuff i can practice instead of just turns?

please dont flame me :( :flaming :flaming
First off, I think it's better for you to come to this board and ask for advice than to keep trying on your own and end up dumping your new bike. Honestly, the first thing you should do is take the MSF Course. Do you have insurance on the bike? If not, take the course and don't ride it 'til you do. It's not even about just dumping it, it's paying more attention to the bike than your surroundings when you don't feel comfortable. One thing I'd say is that you want the bike and it's control to be second nature. That way you can spend your time watching out for crazy semi-truck drivers, assholes talking on their cell phones while driving, women putting on makeup instead of paying attention to the bike in her blind spot, etc.

Some very good points have been made in this thread that aren't necessarily obvious to a new rider. This board :YEA 's
 

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portaman03 said:
Don't forget to look through the turn, turn your head where you want to go and the bike will follow. Riding a bicycle is good practice, it will help you get a feel for being on two wheels. Throttle control as well as clutching, shifting, and braking can all be learned in a straight line. Also, never brake while turning or leaning. It will cause you to lose traction, which is what is keeping both wheels on the ground and you on the seat.
dont say never..

dragging the rear brake helps ALOT with stability in slow parking lot maneuvers
 

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i love my R1
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find a nice country road and just go for a long cruise, maybe even listen to an mp3 player (only one earpiece) with some of your favorite music. that helped me to get used to riding
 

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Dont worry about it man. Everybody starts off the same way. I've been riding for almost two years, and after not being able to ride due to weather or my personal life, I feel the same sometimes when I jump back on. Sometimes I'll just have an off day and wont push it in the canyons. Just go at your own pace and after a while it'll become second nature :) Two most important things, be safe and have fun! :*tongue
 

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Not DoD Blocked
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ride, ride, and ride some more. you will probable not ever be comfertable enough to ride into traffic so one day you will just have to do it. I dont think anybody is truely comfertable riding in traffic which is good, it keeps you alert and paying attention to your surroundings. everytime i ride i understand that its most likely not me causeing the accident but some retard putting on makeup or spilling coffee in their lap. traffic sucks, period. but you just do it because you love riding.

Also, take the MSF course if you havent already. take your time learning. learn to counter steer, well just take everbodies advise before me. good luck and have some fun.
 

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Vrooom on a Yamaha
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I have been riding for over 14 years (Dirt Bikes, Cruisers, etc). This past September I got my first Super-sport bike. Just because of the riding position on the bike i felt uncomfortable at first. The more you ride the more feel you will get for your bike. Take corners slow until you can find a wide sweeping corner that you get comfortable with.

When you start riding in traffic keep your head on a swivel. Always assume that no drivers can see you, so drive to be seen. Stay out of blind spots. Always keep a finger on the front brake and get your thumb ready for the horn. Leave your high beam on during the day.

70-80% of your stopping power comes from your front brakes. A bike will stop faster than a car. The rear brakes will lock if too much pressure is applied, so practice on a straight away (going slow) until you get a feel for the point where it locks. Make sure you don't get past that point unless you are prepared for it to lock.

Use the buddy system when riding so if something happens you aren't sitting in a ditch by yourself with broken limbs. Get some gear (helmet, gloves, jacket, pants, boots) and wear it. If you ever go down you will be glad you had them on.
 

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Reppin' that 405
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Discussion Starter #15
im def. going to take the MSF course when i can (march, they fill up fast!) and hopefully ill feel better after that.

i dont have my license yet so im just driving around in my neighborhood and that parking lot.

my uncle was telling me about counter-steering but i never ran into it (not yet anyways) i dont undestand how it works...cause in the parking lot if i turn left i go left and if i turn right i go right. so im a little confused on that part.

thanks everyone for the good feedback, im going to go out later and practice some. for that guys that toke the MSF course what can i practice out in the parking lot? just so i have a heads up out there on the course.

one last question...how you make sharp right turns? say i am at a intersection and want to turn right i always end up going WIDE and can never stay in my lane..do i need to lean more or what?
 

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take the msf course, it will clear up a lot of things
 

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Since this is your first bike I would strongly suggest taking the MSF class as soon as possible. If you have never rode before you might be better of keeping your bike in the garage until after you have taken the MSF. After taking the class you will feel much more comfortable on your bike.
 

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2003 R6
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matttx said:
my uncle was telling me about counter-steering but i never ran into it (not yet anyways) i dont undestand how it works...cause in the parking lot if i turn left i go left and if i turn right i go right. so im a little confused on that part.

one last question...how you make sharp right turns? say i am at a intersection and want to turn right i always end up going WIDE and can never stay in my lane..do i need to lean more or what?
I think of it this way. You have bicycle turning and motorcycle turning. Under about 10 MPH its bicycle turning. If you turn right it goes right ect. After about 10-15mph is when the counter steering takes effect. It would be a good thing to find an empty road or something so you can practice on an actual road before you start riding in traffic. It took me a while before I got comfortable turning. I remember my first couple times on a bike it would start going into the other lane and id freak cause it wouldnt go back lol.

And with the wide turns I used to do it all the time my first few times on a bike. You just get kinda used to the feel after a while and you can sharpen it up once your not to nervous with the turning. Hope some of this helps you out man. Good luck with everthing!
 

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Because I Can
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ill-legal? said:
Honestly, the first thing you should do is take the MSF Course.
I'm in the same boat. The bike will be in my garage by the end of this month. I won't be riding it though until it gets a little warmer. I will also be taking the MSF class asap, but I was originally planning on riding around the neighborhood to get use to a bike before signing up for that class. You guys are saying that I should take that class first....even with no riding experience?

I know it's a bike and motorcycle are completely different, but with the stated similarities aboves it makes me feel a little better. I've be downhill mountain biking all my life (currently 24) and still ride all the time. Hopefully they are the same in handling fundamentals.
 

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Reppin' that 405
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Discussion Starter #20
thanks cmp007. that def. explains counter-steering. i haven't made a turn over 15mph

i just got in this month they had one opening for january 19th so i rushed up there and got signed up. if i didnt i would have to wait till the end of march.
 
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