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hi i have a 2006 r6 that over heats the light comes on at 251 . when im riding everything is good my when i stop it keeps goin and going up in temp. the fans come on and the coolit level looks good
can someone can tell me what i sould do to fix this THANKS BOSS
 

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Riding is a lifestyle
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Consider getting a new radiator cap. Bad pressure = bad cooling. But there is no circumstance in hell you should let you bike get that hot. You'll have some major problems
 

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When's the last time you flushed your coolant? Any changes to the bike before this all started happening, like did you top off the coolant with water? Check the radiator fins to make sure they aren't mangled or have anything that might keep them from doing their job.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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You should definitely check coolant levels. The way I do it is to fill it up while cold and replace the cap. When the bike gets up to temp it will boil over the unneeded coolant into the coolant overflow cannister. After turning the bike off and letting the cannister over fill I quickly remove the cannister ( careful it's hot ) and fill it with coolant to the full line and replace it. I then repeat the process of letting the bike heat up till the fans come on, shutting it off and letting the coolant do it's thing. It shouldn't overflow now. Let the bike sit for a few hours and check the coolant overflow can again. It should be lower than when it was hot. If The engine is cold and the can is above full, dump the unneeded amount to bring the coolant level back to full. If it is low then fill with more coolant to the full line. Repeat the process, letting the bike warm up till the fans come on, shut it off and wait. When the bike has sat for for a few hours and is cold again, the coolant level in the overflow should be at full still. There it is your done.

I would say that is best to start this procedure with a new radiator cap. They are cheap and it's worth it to get done before trying to flush the coolant system. If after all that, the bike still overheats you have another problem. Either the water pump is bad, or perhaps a blown head gasket, also be sure that booth fans are working. You may double check your spark plugs to be sure they are the proper ones. Should be either an NGK CR10EK or CR9EK. In most cases it is because of low coolant levels, if you let it go too long you stand the chance of cracking your head or blowing a head gasket. Which will also make the bike overheat.
 

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Insert nonsense here
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You should definitely check coolant levels. The way I do it is to fill it up while cold and replace the cap. When the bike gets up to temp it will boil over the unneeded coolant into the coolant overflow cannister. After turning the bike off and letting the cannister over fill I quickly remove the cannister ( careful it's hot ) and fill it with coolant to the full line and replace it. I then repeat the process of letting the bike heat up till the fans come on, shutting it off and letting the coolant do it's thing. It shouldn't overflow now. Let the bike sit for a few hours and check the coolant overflow can again. It should be lower than when it was hot. If The engine is cold and the can is above full, dump the unneeded amount to bring the coolant level back to full. If it is low then fill with more coolant to the full line. Repeat the process, letting the bike warm up till the fans come on, shut it off and wait. When the bike has sat for for a few hours and is cold again, the coolant level in the overflow should be at full still. There it is your done.

I would say that is best to start this procedure with a new radiator cap. They are cheap and it's worth it to get done before trying to flush the coolant system. If after all that, the bike still overheats you have another problem. Either the water pump is bad, or perhaps a blown head gasket, also be sure that booth fans are working. You may double check your spark plugs to be sure they are the proper ones. Should be either an NGK CR10EK or CR9EK. In most cases it is because of low coolant levels, if you let it go too long you stand the chance of cracking your head or blowing a head gasket. Which will also make the bike overheat.
I agree with all of this except for the bolded part. You aren't incorrect by any means, but what it is also doing is forcing the air that is trapped in the system from removing the cap and adding the coolant to the radiator out into the overflow tank. Some fluid gets forced into the reservoir in the process of the air escaping as well.

Ideally what you want to do is get the bike up to operating temps and drain the coolant. DO NOT remove the cap until you have removed the drain bolt on the right lower engine and let the coolant drain for at least a minute. If you remove the cap before that the system will still be pressurized and spit coolant all over you. Be careful removing the drain bolt as well as it will be pressurized too, but at a much smaller opening. By removing the cap after a minute you allow the air to flow thus allowing the coolant to drain faster. (It's kind like putting your finger over a straw and the liquid staying in the straw when you remove it from the glass...as soon as you remove the seal [your finger] the liquids flows out of the straw.) Let the coolant drain until the engine reaches room temp. Also remove the coolant reservoir and empty it. Tighten the drain bolt and fill with a coolant and water wetter mixture. I used 30% coolant, the rec amount of watter wetter and water (use distilled for deposit control). My bike is stored in my garage and freezing is not an issue. At 30% coolant, it still allows enough protection for me. Anyhow, also fill the coolant reservoir to the max line and tighten the radiator cap. Let the bike warm up to operating temperature. During this time the water pump and natural tendencies will force all the trapped air to the top of the system and out into the reservoir. This MAY cause it to over fill so keep an eye on it. Once the fans cycle, cut the bike off. As it is cooling down the system loosing pressure will natural suck the coolant from the reservoir back into the radiator to make up for the lost coolant during the bleeding. Top the reservoir back off if needed and ride her like normal. Keep an eye on the reservoir for the next few riding sessions.

Notes: I would replace your cap for sure. Also check to make sure your reservoir tube is attached to your reservoir cap. If it isn't it can't exchange the coolant.

Luke and I are on the same page, I just wanted to add some key notes that I felt were important too.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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To clarify what we are getting at. The overflow cannister is actually more like an expansion tank. As the coolant expands it builds pressure in the radiator. This pressure is what raises the boiling point of the coolant. At some point the coolant has to boil and or expand beyond the radiator caps ability to hold pressure. When the radiator cap opens up under pressure, expanded coolant and pressurized gases transfer into the coolant overflow / expansion tank. It works the other way too. As the system de-pressurizes, it will draw back coolant from the expansion tank. It will usually draw back what it puts in. This is why there is a full and low mark on the coolant overflow tank. When the the fluid level sits at low the coolant level as a whole in the system is low. When it's at full obviously the system is full.

The reason we say to allow the system to " purge " is because it takes a cycle or two before the entire system equalizes itself. If you were to just fill the radiator and the coolant overflow until they were full, the system would just spew coolant all over the place and then leave no room in the coolant overflow for future expansion. So purging it sets it at it's normal level, leaving just the right amount of room for expansion. As the system evaporates coolant you simply add more coolant to the overflow tank to it's full line.

The reason that the radiator cap is usually the culprit is because it is the coolant systems pressure regulator. If the cap goes bad and doesn't open, the system will over pressurize and possibly burst the radiator. If it locks closed it usually causes the water pump to stop flowing coolant as well, due to the coolant flash boiling and basically causing vapor lock. That is rare though. The cap most often fails by either staying open or loosing ability to hold pressure. This causes the water to expand to much reducing the heat exchange between molecules and then simply purging coolant into the expansion tank. This reduced ability to transfer heat causes the bike to run hot, even with a seemingly full coolant system.

Cracked heads will cause the same thing. It basically allows gas to exchange between the head crack and the coolant system causing a pressure loss. This pressure loss as we know, reduces the ability for the radiator to do it's job. There are kits that can be used on the radiator to detect if the head is in fact cracked. Heads don't usually crack unless they are ran hot several times or for any more than a few minutes. Basically if the engine begins to overheat shut it down IMMEDIATELY.
 

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Insert nonsense here
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Luke, I have to ask you if you have ever experienced coolant spewing out over the reservoir by filling the radiator to the full mark, tightening the cap, and then filling the reservoir to the full mark and allowing the engine to reach operating temperature?

I ask because EVERY time I do a coolant flush at work, I OVERFILL the reservoir so that when the radiator purges air as the customer is heat cycling the system from normal driving it can replace the air in the radiator with the "extra" coolant I added thus leaving the reservoir at the full mark. I have never ran into a overflow problem in the past six years. BUT, I do use a spill free funnel ( [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-24610-Spill-Free-Funnel/dp/B001A4EAV0[/ame] ) and allow the system to reach operating temperature before I remove it. It may be that at the time of doing this I am relieving enough of the air pockets (almost all) to not cause a overflow situation once the cap is returned to the radiator and once again heat cycled. If I were to simple top off the radiator and replace the cap there would be an awful lot of air pockets and I could possibly see this spewing situation that you refer to. What is your take?
 

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crashing aint so bad
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Depends on your approach. I can't quiet grasp exactly what you are telling me. But, I can say that If you filled your bike while cold till the radiator was full and capped it off, then filled the expansion tank, you would get some overflowing coolant out of the expansion tank once the bike gets up to temp. This is assuming you just went out to your bike as it sits right now and filled the radiator back to the top again. Different story if you do a coolant flush.

With a car it may have more give or take for expansion. There is a much larger radiator and expansion tank that may allow for the coolants expansion. So it may or may not spew out. It probably does, but only while in traffic. The coolant overflow will vent out through a tube to the ground so it won't be super obvious if it does overflow. Seems to me you are saying that you figure there will be air in the coolant system and the overfilled expansion tank will fill the radiator. Makes sense to me, but I don't think that is the prescribed method.

With a coolant flush there is the opportunity for air pockets to develop. Most mechanics will run the car while they fill the radiator, to help eliminate that issue. Once the radiator is full you will usually find that after the thermostat opens it will leave more space in the radiator for coolant. If you forget to account for that you may not have enough fluid in the system. In which case the overfilled expansion tank may replenish that. You should have the engine running, allowing the thermostat to open. Then you should fill the radiator till its full and then replace the radiator cap. let the engine run until up to running temp and shut down. With the expansion tank filled to the full mark you should find that it does fill up even more, over the full line. After the engine cools down it will pull back what it needs into the system. If it goes below the full line on the expansion tank, then re-fill it to the full line. If it does not go back below the full line, then you need to siphon or purge coolant out of the expansion tank until at the full line. At that point you should be fine.

I think in your case you are allowing the coolant to expand since you have the radiator cap off as you fill and allow the car to get to temp. This is not ideal since the system needs to be set while under pressure. The expanded coolant will condense and reduce in volume as it cools. So it would make sense that it pulls fluid in from the expansion tank after the cap is replaced. As I know it, the idea is to place fluid in the system while the car is running and pause when full. Wait for the thermostat to open and fill again till full. The idea is to replace the cap as soon as the radiator is full. Then allow the car to get up to running temp. Otherwise the coolant will boil over and out of the radiator. If you replace the radiator cap before it has a chance to do that you contain it to the expansion tank instead. Then the system will stay closed loop so to speak. The expansion tank already filled will probably just fill up a bit more. As the engine cools it will draw back coolant into the radiator. Then you just adjust the amount of fluid in the expansion tank to the full line. I think if done correctly you will simply have to add coolant to the expansion tank after the first fill up. I like to let the vehicle run up to temp and cool down a couple times just to be sure. That is just me though.
 

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Insert nonsense here
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Yeah, I was referring to an actual flush. I completely agree if you fill a cold radiator to the top after it has already bleed itself you will definitely overflow the expansion tank.

And you are on the money with the car running while filling. That is what that no spill funnel is for. It allows the system to expand and contract the fluid as it cycles. I usually let it run until the fans cut on then remove the funnel and tighten the cap. If you do flushes much you should look into this. It makes it soooooo much easier.

I'm glad you can appreciate the mechanical side of our passion. Its too often that people have no idea what is going on between there legs. (pun intended is you so please :) ) Where do you gain most of your knowledge from if you don't mind me asking. Experience? Schooling?
 

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OMG I didnt know there was so many words to describe the same simple process in such detail! but yeah if you haven't figured it out yet, I think that if your coolant levels are fine then you probably have a circulation issue- block in radiator, bad cap, water pump, or thermostat isnt getting the pressure it needs to open. Check the temp on the hoses going to and from the radiator and see if they are both up to temp. that may help to narrow it down. but either way good luck.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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I have been working on cars and doing mechanics since I could walk. I was a diesel tech for several years and have just always been mechanically inclined. My dad is an ASE master certified engineer and always made me go to the books if I had a question. So I learned early in life that reading is power.........

I'm by far not a master mechanic, but am very good at troubleshooting. As for the tear down and rebuild of engines ( more of an engineer thing ) I don't do so much. I am much better at keeping engines alive. Put it this way, I own a 1961 Corvair that runs very well considering that it has an estimated 250K miles on it. The case has never been split either, so it's running on the stock crank and cam bearings even. There isn't much I haven't come across in terms of engine issues and can help diagnose things pretty well. Once the problem is known, fixing it is a breeze. My approach is to start with the free options first and move on up the expense trail until problem is solved, unless the true problem pokes out sooner. Remember that the next time your car throws a code and it shows it to be an EVAP leak. Believe it or not a $10 dollar gas cap may be the fix.
 

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Insert nonsense here
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I have been working on cars and doing mechanics since I could walk. I was a diesel tech for several years and have just always been mechanically inclined. My dad is an ASE master certified engineer and always made me go to the books if I had a question. So I learned early in life that reading is power.........

I'm by far not a master mechanic, but am very good at troubleshooting. As for the tear down and rebuild of engines ( more of an engineer thing ) I don't do so much. I am much better at keeping engines alive. Put it this way, I own a 1961 Corvair that runs very well considering that it has an estimated 250K miles on it. The case has never been split either, so it's running on the stock crank and cam bearings even. There isn't much I haven't come across in terms of engine issues and can help diagnose things pretty well. Once the problem is known, fixing it is a breeze. My approach is to start with the free options first and move on up the expense trail until problem is solved, unless the true problem pokes out sooner. Remember that the next time your car throws a code and it shows it to be an EVAP leak. Believe it or not a $10 dollar gas cap may be the fix.
That's good to hear. I have always admired your post and you make it obvious that you do your research. Experience is one of the best keys to knowledge in this field.

I really would like to get an old Nova/Chevelle/Trans am and get her back to a daily driver form one of these days. There is something intriguing about having something so old purr like a kitten. Props to keeping the Corvair alive. :cheers

I myself am a Master Technician for Acura and working towards my ASE master certification. (My employer doesn't push the drive for ASE techs since we are a one brand dealer, so it's been a slow road.) But on the other hand I achieved my master certification for Acura in one of, if not the shortest time frames ever. They send us to school in Atlanta about once a year and there are over 130 modules of hands on research and test you have to complete with Acura. Not to mention the same amount of test in the home/self study format that also have to be completed. I did all that could and even made myself have homework when they sent me. I attended and graduated from NTI in Mooresville, NC before being employed by Acura as well. (A division of UTI) The passion started when my mother met my step-dad at my young age of 16. He had always tinkered on cars as a hobby and knows all the old school tricks and things that books just can't teach you. So hanging with him in the shop late at night created my passion. Turning that passion into a career may not have been the best choice, as I sometimes can't stand to look at cars after I get home, but it is definitely and interesting and enjoying job.

As for the EVAP leaks, the systems are getting so advanced that they can almost tell you exactly where the leak is on the new cars. But yes, 90% of the time it is either the gas cap seal or a distorted filler neck. The easiest fix that sends a lot of technicians down a troubleshooting path with no results.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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Funny how it works. I love working on cars and bikes all the time. But my current career has nothing to do with mechanics. I'm guilty by association. I had been a diesel tech for about 5 years but it was more about maintenance than engine work. I did a lot of brakes, transmissions, rear ends, PTO's and stuff like that. Of course I did a lot of oil changes, coolant, and regular maintenance too. Then I became a big rig Driver and did that full time for 4 years. Now I'm a sound engineer. I do sound for bands and corporate events. I work on bikes and cars for fun in my spare time.

I guess my drive to learn and research all of the stuff I post about is stemmed from my dad. I used to hate it. " Hey dad, how do I adjust the carbs on my car " ....... Dad: " Be right back.............Here, read this book and come back when your done adjusting the carbs ". Now I work with hundred thousand dollar P.A's that can be ran using my I phone and a network of computers. So I have spent a lot of time reading and researching stuff. I do it because I hate doing crap twice and hate being wrong. I may not always be right, but you will see that I usually bring Media to support why I have my decisions.

I would love to get a Nova II. I'm not a fan of the big V8 cars, but the Nova II is up my alley. I'm kicking around getting a late model Corvair to go with my early model. Perhaps in a few years when I am a little more stable in life, I will build me a Factory Five GTM too.
 

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Insert nonsense here
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That's a heck of a career change! I could totally see myself doing something like that though. I'm an audiophile at heart and have ALWAYS loved it since I was a kid.

Your dad taught you well though. That is my method of learning. You have to be book smart before you work on something, otherwise you won't know the principle behind what you are repairing. And if you don't know the principle it will lead to costly mistakes.

With that, what do you know about DVD Audio.... :) It's something I am trying to get into and see what all it involves.
 

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Sex and Bikes Go Together
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Way to derail the thread guys!!!!


























-i kid i kid
 

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I have been working on cars and doing mechanics since I could walk. I was a diesel tech for several years and have just always been mechanically inclined. My dad is an ASE master certified engineer and always made me go to the books if I had a question. So I learned early in life that reading is power.........
wasnt aware ASE certified "engineers". Unless youre confusing Master technician with "engineer". Engineering requires college credit hours.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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My father has gone to several courses across the country many times over the past 20 years. I know that he has the highest ranking ASE certification. Whether it's engineer or tech I'm not positive. I know at one point he wore a patch that said engineer on it. I know for a fact that he cannot advance any further with ASE.

As for the engineer title I don't believe you have to go to school ( read as college ) and have a degree to become an engineer of certain job types. Think Locomotive engineer and sound engineer here. The school credits that are earned by doing the classes make it possible. Some schooling is obviously required, but I don't think a degree is the requirement. A friend of mine is going to a program in which after completion, he will be able to run trains. That will make him an engineer. It is an 11 month program like UTI. I believe that certain types of job titles require the degree to go with it, such as electrical engineer, or civil engineering. Some other types that use the title are different in that they only require that you are an unquestionable professional at your craft.

Take me for instance, I can go by two titles. I can go with sound technician, or sound engineer. What defines the two is based on what I am actually doing at the time. A sound technician will install, set up and or make the system do and perform as the sound engineer wishes. The sound technician does not actually run the sound for the show. A sound engineer will do not only set up and tech of the sound system, but he will run the sound as well. Since I actually run sound most of the time I can use the engineer title, although I do sometimes only set the equipment up. I am the owner of my own company so I use the Engineer title most of the time, unless I am specifically doing a set up or designing a system. I have a pay scale for each role. Less if I'm running as a tech and more if I'm running as an engineer. I am not an Acoustician however, who is pretty much all of the above, but there job mostly revolves around product design and room enhancement and requires a degree or very large amount of schooling. An acoustician will also have a very distinct knowledge of the sound characteristics of different materials and objects for the purpose of fixing and or enhancing the listening spaces they work with. Most likely, the I-Max theaters are set up with the counsel of an Acoustician. But most acoustician's don't actually run sound for live events. More than you wanted to know I'm sure, but just pointing out that an engineer title is not always accompanied by a degree. I poses a great and high understanding of my craft. My craft uses an engineering title, so I use that title. There is no school that I can go to the will issue a Sound Engineer degree or certificate.

As for DVD audio I don't know so much about. There are many levels of engineering that go into the making of a movie. You have the guys on set actually recording the stuff, or the recording engineers who record the musical scores and the scenes. Then you have the Mixers, or mixing engineers that mix all that audio and edit it, to fit for the movie. And once you have the movie done and all the audio is edited and placed within the movie you have the mastering process. The mastering process sets the final timbre of the whole thing. The mastering engineers job is to adjust the audio sound for the best overall experience and to usually raise the volume, or reduce dynamic range. They may also change the volume throughout the piece to create dramatic effect as per producers requests.

To get into sound you kinda have to have a large understanding of it. Not only that, but you also have to understand the psychology of it. The best engineers are ones who play instruments and have a very acute ear for the placement of pieces in a mix. They have a great understanding of the audio spectrum, where things exist within the spectrum and can hear the frequencies in their heads without a guide. The ability to understand music and sound as a whole is only the first step. Then you have to understand how to capture it. You have to know how to run all the equipment and how to make it reproduce the sound that you want to hear. If thats not enough, you also have to be able to set the equipment up in such a way that it works to best recreate sound in a predictable and uniform manor. Which means that you must have a great understanding of room dynamics and sound behavior in different atmospheres and spaces. Once you get that far you have to then play what I call psychologist. Just because it's what you want to hear, doesn't mean that everyone else wants to hear it too. So you have to create sound that is exceptable to the masses and not just yourself. I call myself an overpaid babysitter. My job is to make three groups of people happy. The person('s) that hired me, the band or people I'm actually doing sound for and the people that are listening. I must make all three happy to have done a good job. Sound is subjective, so 9 out of 10 may not complain or may actually enjoy the work, but there is always one who hates it. I left a concert once because I thought the sound was so bad. So it is definitely more than most see it as. It's not like being a DJ where you just put a bunch of stuff together and everyone is happy. It usually takes many people all with many years of experience to get it to the point where the majority of people except it is being good. The hard part is doing things with consistency. You can't win sometimes, you have to win all the time.

So yeah this turned out to be a huge thread jack. But that is how you get to know people.
 
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